Pioneers in an emergent field, the authors of Climate Change Law and Policy have created a modular and accessible text with extensive web resources. Designed for 2- and 3-credit courses, discussion, commentary, and exercises are integrated into every chapter. Tracing key legal developments, the scope of this landmark text spans international, United States, foreign, state and local, and nongovernmental efforts to address climate change. A concise text that takes a global view, Climate Change Law and Policy features: accessible and modular format that can adapt to a variety of teaching objectives timely coverage of key legal developments in climate change control around the world discussion of the role of non-nation-state actors in forming climate change policy, including cities, corporations, NGO's, and individuals draws from commentary of leading experts on each topic exercises in each chapter based on major law and policy issues extensive web resources, including updates and links
The revised edition of Charles J. Meyers et al. Water Resource Management, 3rd ed., 1988. This edition places a greater emphasis on statutory systems than in prior editions, and the materials have been bolstered on public interest issues under state and federal laws. New cases have been added and significant new developments are captured by the addition of relevant textual material, notes of recent legislative activity, and scholarly commentary. The earlier editions' national orientation has been broadened, reflecting the fact that water issues are not limited to the West's perceived scarcity. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
In this, the second edition of State Constitutional Law: The Modern Experience, the authors present cases, scholarly writings, and other materials about our ever-evolving, ever-more-relevant state charters of government. The casebook starts by placing state constitutions in context--in the context of a federal system that leaves some powers exclusively with the States, delegates some powers exclusively to the Federal Government, and permits overlapping authority by both sovereigns in many areas. The resulting combination of state and federal charters--what might be called American Constitutional Law--presents fruitful opportunities for give and take, for exporting and importing constitutional tools and insights between and among the different sovereigns. The casebook often addresses the point by explaining how the U.S. Constitution deals with an issue before discussing how the state constitutions handle an identical or similar issue. At other times, the casebook explains and illustrates how the state constitutions contain provisions that have no parallel in the U.S. Constitution. A central theme of the book, explored in the context of a variety of constitutional guarantees, is that state constitutions provide a rich source of rights independent of the federal constitution. Considerable space is devoted to the reasons why a state court might construe the liberty and property rights found in their constitutions, to use two prominent examples, more broadly than comparable rights found in the U.S. Constitution. Among the reasons considered are: differences in the text between the state and federal constitutional provisions, the smaller scope of the state courts' jurisdiction, state constitutional history, unique state traditions and customs, and disagreement with the U.S. Supreme Court's interpretation of similar language. State constitutional law, like its federal counterpart, is not confined to individual rights. The casebook also explores the organization and structure of state and local governments, the method of choosing state judges, the many executive-branch powers found in state constitutions but not in their federal counterpart, the ease with which most state constitutions can be amended, and other topics, such as taxation, public finance and school funding. The casebook is not parochial. It looks at these issues through the lens of important state court decisions from nearly every one of our 50 States. In that sense, it is designed for a survey course, one that does not purport to cover any one State's constitution in detail but that considers the kinds of provisions found in many state charters. Like a traditional contracts, real property or torts textbook, the casebook uses the most interesting state court decisions from around the country to illustrate the astonishing array of state constitutional issues at play in American Constitutional Law. It is difficult to overstate the growing significance of state constitutional law. Many of the ground-breaking constitutional debates of the day are being aired in the state courts under their own constitutions--often as a prelude to debates about whether to nationalize this or that right under the National Constitution. To use the most salient example, it is doubtful that there would have been a national right to marriage equality in 2015, see Obergefell v. Hodges, without the establishment of a Massachusetts right to marry in 2003, see Goodridge v. Department of Public Health. In other areas of constitutional litigation--gun rights, capital punishment, property rights, school funding, free exercise claims, to name but a few--state courts often are the key innovators as well, relying on their own constitutions to address individual rights and structural debates of the twenty-first century. The mission of the casebook is to introduce students to this increasingly significant body of American law and to prepare them to practic
This law school casebook presents the law and policy of natural resource management in a user-friendly and engaging manner. The book covers a wide range of natural resourcesâe"from forests and wildlife to oceans and riversâe"with problem exercises and case studies for students to sharpen their understanding of the issues. The book begins with an exploration of the economic, scientific, political and ethical considerations that drive natural resource policy as well as consideration of the natural resource management challenges presented by common pool resources, scientific uncertainty, mismatched scale, market failures and institutional adequacy. The book then explores these themes and explicates the basic legal regimes for a range of resourcesâe"wildlife, fisheries, whaling, water, protected lands, range, mining, and forests. The book also considers natural resource law and management on both public lands and private property, as well as in international settings. For more information and additional teaching materials, visit the companion site.
Environmental Economics: A Critique of Benefit-Cost Analysis describes, in a non-technical, readily understandable way, why the practice of benefit-cost analysis in environmental settings is heavily biased against the environment. The book provides environmentalists with the tools necessary to show policy-makers that pursuing many policies with apparent costs greater than benefits are, in fact, welfare-enhancing.
The fourth edition was updated to include important new Supreme Court cases on governmental prayer, reproductive healthcare rights, the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA), and same-sex marriage. The fourth edition continues the book''s interdisciplinary approach to law and religion, its student-friendly notes and questions, and its inclusion of numerous non-Supreme Court cases from a variety of state, federal, and international courts. The chapters were reorganized to highlight the impact of the Court''s most recent cases on the subject matter of law and religion. The first six chapters provide the foundational information about free exercise, establishment, and RFRA: 1. Free Exercise of Religion identifies the ever-increasing diversity of American religion versus non-religion. It now includes United States v. Seeger, as a lead conscientious objection case explaining what the Court means by "religion." 2. Introduction to Establishment now includes the Court''s decision upholding government-sponsored prayer in Town of Greece v. Galloway, and asks if Galloway will change all future Establishment Clause analysis. 3. What is an Establishment of Religion? examines older establishment precedents about religious symbols and monuments, public funding of religion, and religious speech in light of Galloway. The chapter also focuses on the funding issue the Court will hear in the 2016 Term in Trinity Lutheran Church v. Pauley, which asks if state bans on church funding violate the federal Establishment Clause. 4: Constitutional and Statutory Protection of Free Exercise provides extensive coverage of the ramifications of the Court''s RFRA decision, Hobby Lobby, which accommodated for-profit businesses from providing contraceptive benefits to their employees. 5: Conscience, Complicity, and Conscientious Objection relates Hobby Lobby to the Court''s order searching a compromise between religious nonprofits and the government in Zubik v. Burwell. This chapter explores military, medical, and legal conscientious objection and analyzes the increasing number of complicity claims faced by courts hearing RFRA cases. It also includes the case of Kim Davis, the Kentucky clerk who refused to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. 6: Conflicts between Individual and Institutional Religious Freedom explores the Court''s increasing protection of institutional over individual religious freedom by looking at three topics: church property disputes, employment discrimination, and torts. The employment discrimination section now includes an overview of Title VII''s religious discrimination provisions and the Court''s recent decision interpreting them in EEOC v. Abercrombie and Fitch. The chapter also explores in detail the repercussions of Hosanna-Tabor v. EEOC, the ministerial-exception case that was brand new in the third edition. The first six chapters provided the basics about free exercise, establishment, and RFRA. Later chapters are more specialized and can be assigned at the professor''s discretion, depending upon student interest. 7: RLUIPA: The Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act. RLUIPA now has its own chapter, which focuses on how the RFRA decisions studied in Chapters 4 and 5 will influence interpretation of RFRA''s twin sister statute, which applies to institutionalized persons (prisoners) and land use. 8: Comparative Religious Freedom was completely revised. It now includes cases from other countries that parallel the subjects already studied in earlier chapters of the casebook. A section on religious garb, including a Turkish case about hijab bans, recalls Abercrombie. A section on blasphemy connects to the free (religious) speech jurisprudence. Conscience receives extensive treatment because it has become so important in U.S. law. Chapter 8 incl
This casebook explores issues relating to property rights, environmental protection, and natural resources in Indian country. The book explores tribal, cultural and religious relationships with the land, fundamental principles of federal Indian law, land ownership and property rights of tribes, land use and environmental protection, natural resources development, taxation of lands and resources, water rights, usufructuary (hunting, fishing, gathering) rights, and international approaches to indigenous rights in land and natural resources. It is designed to be used in a stand-alone course or as a supplemental reader for courses in environmental law, natural resources law, or Native American studies.The third edition updates the casebook to include recent Supreme Court cases as well as other judicial and legislative developments since 2008. The new edition also expands the materials on cultural and religious resources, the federal trust doctrine, the Cobell settlement, water rights settlements, natural resources damages, and international law.
Land Use Regulation: Cases and Materials, Fifth Edition is a dynamic, scholarly, yet practical teaching approach that focuses on the role of the lawyer in land use regulatory matters and the factors that influence land development decisions. Offering more comprehensive changes than in any edition since the book was first published, the Fifth Edition offers a new chapter addressing emerging issues in the field, including regulation of medical marijuana and fracking, responses to problems posed by vulnerable populations such as the homeless, continuing developments in “smart growth,” and changes in redevelopment law. It also features a thorough reorganization of takings materials, combining all of them in one chapter and addressing emerging issues.
This concise casebook distills the major themes of taxation. It offers well-developed problems and discussion questions in every chapter. The book is designed to help teachers and students make sense of both law and policy, and demands that students read the Code in addition to the text. Like the first edition, this edition develops a running analysis of income-tax and consumption-tax elements in the Code. It also focuses on the social policy effects of the tax law. The second edition is fully updated through the 2009 Stimulus Act.
This federal Indian law casebook has an unprecedented focus on Native Nation-building, including cutting-edge materials on tribal economies and tribal justice systems unavailable elsewhere. The Seventh Edition retains classic material on the history of federal Indian law and policy, including the medieval origins of the "Doctrine of Discovery," and the shifting eras of Indian law leading to the current Nation-building era. The book covers the federal tribal relationship; tribal sovereignty and jurisdiction; Indian religion and culture; water rights; treaty rights; rights of Alaska natives and native Hawaiians; and international legal perspectives.
Modern Water Law provides a comprehensive text to study the range of legal issues and doctrines that affect water resources. This is a national book that uses many recent cases, bringing a fresh perspective to the field. The authors begin with private water use rights, including common law doctrines for riparian reasonable use and prior appropriation, as well as groundwater rights and the statutory schemes for administering water use rights. The book explores the range of public rights in water, including navigation, the public trust doctrine, federal reserved rights, and interstate water management. The book also introduces modern challenges and environmental protection goals, focusing on the energy-water nexus, water pollution, and endangered species conflicts. The final chapters combine these concepts in the context of complex watershed restoration challenges and water rights takings litigation.
The first casebook on the subject marks the contours of the field and provides a comprehensive understanding of the law and legal discourse relating to state regulation of sex, bodies, families, and reproduction. This compilation of rich historical and contemporary primary and secondary materials, accompanied by rigorous legal analysis, considers the economic, political, legal, and social factors that influence procreation and parenting. It is attentive to questions of race, ethnicity, socio-economic status, sexual orientation, and ability. Given that reproductive rights are implicated by different bodies of law, the casebook and teacher's manual will serve as guides to help balance expertise in one particular area of the law and enable well-rounded engagement with various issues.
"Property lawyers are increasingly engaged in environmental issues, whether it be the increased interest in conservation easements, national regulation of land use through such statutes as the Endangered Species Act and the Clean Water Act, problems of hazardous waste cleanup, pressures to open private land to public use, or dozens of other environmental additions to traditional property law. This new casebook is the first to provide significant materials on emerging and important environmental issues in the property field. It provides an in-depth treatment of traditional property doctrines, while providing cutting-edge coverage of these emerging environmental questions."--Publisher's website.
Through its excellence in scholarship, clarity, and ease of use, this casebook engages readers in a critical thinking about tort law. It sets forth crisply edited classic tort cases as well as cases reflecting the newest tort law trends. Its authors are a strong combination of respected scholars and those who practice in the subject. The casebook goes beyond judicial decisions and includes key tort-centered legislation and comparative perspectives where relevant. The casebook encourages the reader to understand the law's foundations and debate modern trends within various policy prescriptions. Unbiased in its approach and organized in manageable sections of information, the casebook is a superb tool for productive and stimulating classroom debate. Tort law doctrine and its rationale will come alive for students. The casebook, proven over 13 editions, assures that our students will be effectively guided to embrace the law of torts as a building block for the remainder of law school and a life in the law beyond. This new edition insures that it will maintain its place as the most widely adopted Torts casebook.
This case book is a tightly organized, manageable volume with emphasis on engaging, well-edited cases, useful notes, and crisp textual analysis. An introductory chapter, which now contains the Kelo case, examines property law's scope and position in the U.S. legal system. The next chapter on landlord-tenant law is accessible for first year law students, providing a challenging forum for discussion of the interplay among the common law of property, statutes, and contractual undertakings. Subsequent chapters deal with personal property, the variety of interests in real property, real estate transactions, attributes of landownership, and how municipal/state government controls private land use.

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