A comprehensive treatment of the behavior of linear or nonlinear systems when they are connected in a closed-loop fashion.
This book details the analysis of continuous- and discrete-time dynamical systems described by differential and difference equations respectively. Differential geometry provides the tools for this, such as first-integrals or orbital symmetries, together with normal forms of vector fields and of maps. A crucial point of the analysis is linearization by state immersion. The theory is developed for general nonlinear systems and specialized for the class of Hamiltonian systems. By using the strong geometric structure of Hamiltonian systems, the results proposed are stated in a different, less complex and more easily comprehensible manner. They are applied to physically motivated systems, to demonstrate how much insight into known properties is gained using these techniques. Various control systems applications of the techniques are characterized including: computation of the flow of nonlinear systems; computation of semi-invariants; computation of Lyapunov functions for stability analysis and observer design.
Dr.-Ing. Hao Luo demonstrates the developments of advanced plug-and-play (PnP) process monitoring and control systems for industrial automation processes. With aid of the so-called Youla parameterization, a novel PnP process monitoring and control architecture (PnP-PMCA) with modularized components is proposed. To validate the developments, a case study on an industrial rolling mill benchmark is performed, and the real-time implementation on a laboratory brushless DC motor is presented.
This book introduces non-identifier-based adaptive control (with and without internal model) and its application to the current, speed and position control of mechatronic systems such as electrical synchronous machines, wind turbine systems, industrial servo systems, and rigid-link, revolute-joint robots. In mechatronics, there is often only rough knowledge of the system. Due to parameter uncertainties, nonlinearities and unknown disturbances, model-based control strategies can reach their performance or stability limits without iterative controller design and performance evaluation, or system identification and parameter estimation. The non-identifier-based adaptive control presented is an alternative that neither identifies the system nor estimates its parameters but ensures stability. The adaptive controllers are easy to implement, compensate for disturbances and are inherently robust to parameter uncertainties and nonlinearities. For controller implementation only structural system knowledge (like relative degree, input-to-state stable zero dynamics and known sign of the high-frequency gain) is required. Moreover, the presented controllers guarantee reference tracking with prescribed asymptotic or transient accuracy, i.e. the tracking error eventually tends to or for all time evolves within an a priori specified region. The book presents the theory, modeling and application in a general but detailed and self-contained manner, making it easy to read and understand, particularly for newcomers to the topics covered
This book provides an introduction to the mathematics needed to model, analyze, and design feedback systems. It is an ideal textbook for undergraduate and graduate students, and is indispensable for researchers seeking a self-contained reference on control theory. Unlike most books on the subject, Feedback Systems develops transfer functions through the exponential response of a system, and is accessible across a range of disciplines that utilize feedback in physical, biological, information, and economic systems. Karl Åström and Richard Murray use techniques from physics, computer science, and operations research to introduce control-oriented modeling. They begin with state space tools for analysis and design, including stability of solutions, Lyapunov functions, reachability, state feedback observability, and estimators. The matrix exponential plays a central role in the analysis of linear control systems, allowing a concise development of many of the key concepts for this class of models. Åström and Murray then develop and explain tools in the frequency domain, including transfer functions, Nyquist analysis, PID control, frequency domain design, and robustness. They provide exercises at the end of every chapter, and an accompanying electronic solutions manual is available. Feedback Systems is a complete one-volume resource for students and researchers in mathematics, engineering, and the sciences. Covers the mathematics needed to model, analyze, and design feedback systems Serves as an introductory textbook for students and a self-contained resource for researchers Includes exercises at the end of every chapter Features an electronic solutions manual Offers techniques applicable across a range of disciplines
An excellent introduction to feedback control system design, this book offers a theoretical approach that captures the essential issues and can be applied to a wide range of practical problems. Its explorations of recent developments in the field emphasize the relationship of new procedures to classical control theory, with a focus on single input and output systems that keeps concepts accessible to students with limited backgrounds. The text is geared toward a single-semester senior course or a graduate-level class for students of electrical engineering. The opening chapters constitute a basic treatment of feedback design. Topics include a detailed formulation of the control design program, the fundamental issue of performance/stability robustness tradeoff, and the graphical design technique of loopshaping. Subsequent chapters extend the discussion of the loopshaping technique and connect it with notions of optimality. Concluding chapters examine controller design via optimization, offering a mathematical approach that is useful for multivariable systems.
This book provides an accessible introduction to the principles and tools for modeling, analyzing, and synthesizing biomolecular systems. It begins with modeling tools such as reaction-rate equations, reduced-order models, stochastic models, and specific models of important core processes. It then describes in detail the control and dynamical systems tools used to analyze these models. These include tools for analyzing stability of equilibria, limit cycles, robustness, and parameter uncertainty. Modeling and analysis techniques are then applied to design examples from both natural systems and synthetic biomolecular circuits. In addition, this comprehensive book addresses the problem of modular composition of synthetic circuits, the tools for analyzing the extent of modularity, and the design techniques for ensuring modular behavior. It also looks at design trade-offs, focusing on perturbations due to noise and competition for shared cellular resources. Featuring numerous exercises and illustrations throughout, Biomolecular Feedback Systems is the ideal textbook for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. For researchers, it can also serve as a self-contained reference on the feedback control techniques that can be applied to biomolecular systems. Provides a user-friendly introduction to essential concepts, tools, and applications Covers the most commonly used modeling methods Addresses the modular design problem for biomolecular systems Uses design examples from both natural systems and synthetic circuits Solutions manual (available only to professors at press.princeton.edu) An online illustration package is available to professors at press.princeton.edu
The most visible use of computers and software is processing information for human consumption. The vast majority of computers in use, however, are much less visible. They run the engine, brakes, seatbelts, airbag, and audio system in your car. They digitally encode your voice and construct a radio signal to send it from your cell phone to a base station. They command robots on a factory floor, power generation in a power plant, processes in a chemical plant, and traffic lights in a city. These less visible computers are called embedded systems, and the software they run is called embedded software. The principal challenges in designing and analyzing embedded systems stem from their interaction with physical processes. This book takes a cyber-physical approach to embedded systems, introducing the engineering concepts underlying embedded systems as a technology and as a subject of study. The focus is on modeling, design, and analysis of cyber-physical systems, which integrate computation, networking, and physical processes. The second edition offers two new chapters, several new exercises, and other improvements. The book can be used as a textbook at the advanced undergraduate or introductory graduate level and as a professional reference for practicing engineers and computer scientists. Readers should have some familiarity with machine structures, computer programming, basic discrete mathematics and algorithms, and signals and systems.
This intriguing and motivating book presents the basic ideas and understanding of control, signals and systems for readers interested in engineering and science. Through a series of examples, the book explores both the theory and the practice of control.
Mathematical Modelling in Science and Technology: The Fourth International Conference covers the proceedings of the Fourth International Conference by the same title, held at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland on August 15-17, 1983. Mathematical modeling is a powerful tool to solve many complex problems presented by scientific and technological developments. This book is organized into 20 parts encompassing 180 chapters. The first parts present the basic principles, methodology, systems theory, parameter estimation, system identification, and optimization of mathematical modeling. The succeeding parts discuss the features of stochastic and numerical modeling and simulation languages. Considerable parts deal with the application areas of mathematical modeling, such as in chemical engineering, solid and fluid mechanics, water resources, medicine, economics, transportation, and industry. The last parts tackle the application of mathematical modeling in student management and other academic cases. This book will prove useful to researchers in various science and technology fields.
This book develops the mathematical tools essential for students in the life sciences to describe interacting systems and predict their behavior. From predator-prey populations in an ecosystem, to hormone regulation within the body, the natural world abounds in dynamical systems that affect us profoundly. Complex feedback relations and counter-intuitive responses are common in nature; this book develops the quantitative skills needed to explore these interactions. Differential equations are the natural mathematical tool for quantifying change, and are the driving force throughout this book. The use of Euler’s method makes nonlinear examples tractable and accessible to a broad spectrum of early-stage undergraduates, thus providing a practical alternative to the procedural approach of a traditional Calculus curriculum. Tools are developed within numerous, relevant examples, with an emphasis on the construction, evaluation, and interpretation of mathematical models throughout. Encountering these concepts in context, students learn not only quantitative techniques, but how to bridge between biological and mathematical ways of thinking. Examples range broadly, exploring the dynamics of neurons and the immune system, through to population dynamics and the Google PageRank algorithm. Each scenario relies only on an interest in the natural world; no biological expertise is assumed of student or instructor. Building on a single prerequisite of Precalculus, the book suits a two-quarter sequence for first or second year undergraduates, and meets the mathematical requirements of medical school entry. The later material provides opportunities for more advanced students in both mathematics and life sciences to revisit theoretical knowledge in a rich, real-world framework. In all cases, the focus is clear: how does the math help us understand the science?
When M. Vidyasagar wrote the first edition of Nonlinear Systems Analysis, most control theorists considered the subject of nonlinear systems a mystery. Since then, advances in the application of differential geometric methods to nonlinear analysis have matured to a stage where every control theorist needs to possess knowledge of the basic techniques because virtually all physical systems are nonlinear in nature. The second edition, now republished in SIAM's Classics in Applied Mathematics series, provides a rigorous mathematical analysis of the behavior of nonlinear control systems under a variety of situations. It develops nonlinear generalizations of a large number of techniques and methods widely used in linear control theory. The book contains three extensive chapters devoted to the key topics of Lyapunov stability, input-output stability, and the treatment of differential geometric control theory. Audience: this text is designed for use at the graduate level in the area of nonlinear systems and as a resource for professional researchers and practitioners working in areas such as robotics, spacecraft control, motor control, and power systems.
In this book the authors reduce a wide variety of problems arising in system and control theory to a handful of convex and quasiconvex optimization problems that involve linear matrix inequalities. These optimization problems can be solved using recently developed numerical algorithms that not only are polynomial-time but also work very well in practice; the reduction therefore can be considered a solution to the original problems. This book opens up an important new research area in which convex optimization is combined with system and control theory, resulting in the solution of a large number of previously unsolved problems.
The purpose of this book is to present a self-contained description of the fun damentals of the theory of nonlinear control systems, with special emphasis on the differential geometric approach. The book is intended as a graduate text as weil as a reference to scientists and engineers involved in the analysis and design of feedback systems. The first version of this book was written in 1983, while I was teach ing at the Department of Systems Science and Mathematics at Washington University in St. Louis. This new edition integrates my subsequent teaching experience gained at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign in 1987, at the Carl-Cranz Gesellschaft in Oberpfaffenhofen in 1987, at the University of California in Berkeley in 1988. In addition to a major rearrangement of the last two Chapters of the first version, this new edition incorporates two additional Chapters at a more elementary level and an exposition of some relevant research findings which have occurred since 1985.
Drawing from a wide variety of mathematical subjects, this book aims to show how mathematics is realised in practice in the everyday world. Dozens of applications are used to show that applied mathematics is much more than a series of academic calculations. Mathematical topics covered include distributions, ordinary and partial differential equations, and asymptotic methods as well as basics of modelling. The range of applications is similarly varied, from the modelling of hair to piano tuning, egg incubation and traffic flow. The style is informal but not superficial. In addition, the text is supplemented by a large number of exercises and sideline discussions, assisting the reader's grasp of the material. Used either in the classroom by upper-undergraduate students, or as extra reading for any applied mathematician, this book illustrates how the reader's knowledge can be used to describe the world around them.
Control Theory for Linear Systems deals with the mathematical theory of feedback control of linear systems. It treats a wide range of control synthesis problems for linear state space systems with inputs and outputs. The book provides a treatment of these problems using state space methods, often with a geometric flavour. Its subject matter ranges from controllability and observability, stabilization, disturbance decoupling, and tracking and regulation, to linear quadratic regulation, H2 and H-infinity control, and robust stabilization. Each chapter of the book contains a series of exercises, intended to increase the reader's understanding of the material. Often, these exercises generalize and extend the material treated in the regular text.

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