Steve Hall is Professor of Criminology at the Social Futures Institute, Teesside University, UK.He is the co-author of Violent Night (Berg, 2006), his recent co-authored book Criminal Identities and Consumer Culture (Willan/Routledge, 2008) has been described as ' an important landmark in criminology' and he is also the author of Theorizing Crime and Deviance: A New Perspective (Sage, 2012).
1. The future of labeling theory: foundations and promises -- 2. A proposed resolution of key issues in the political sociology of law -- 3. Contrasting crime general and crime specific theory: The case of hot spots of crime -- 4. Strategy, structure, and corporate crime: the historical context of anticompetitive behavior -- 5. Employee theft: an examination of Gerald Mars and explaination based on equity theory -- 6. Alcohol and theories of homicide -- 7. The empirical status and Hirschi's Control Theory -- 8. The ocial control of spouse assault -- 9. Theoretical formalization, a necessity: The example of Hirchi's Bonding theory -- 10. Control theory and punishment: an analysis of control theory as a penal philosophy -- 11. Power-control verses social-control theories of common delinquency: a comparitive analysis -- Comments: The power of control insociologica theories of delinquency.
Feminist criminology grew out of the Women’s Movement of the 1970s, in response to the male dominance of mainstream criminology – which meant that not only were women largely excluded from carrying out criminological research, they were also barely considered as subjects of that research. In this volume, Claire Renzetti traces the development of feminist criminology from the 1970s to the present, examining the diversity of feminisms which have developed: liberal feminist criminology Marxist, radical and socialist feminist criminologies structured action theory left realism postmodern feminism black/multiracial feminist criminology. She shows how these perspectives have made a great impact on the discipline, the academy, and the criminal justice system, but also highlights the limitations of this influence. How far has feminist criminology transformed research and knowledge production, education, and practice? And how can feminist criminologists continue to shape the future of the discipline?
The Routledge Handbook of Critical Criminology is a collection of original essays specifically designed to offer students, faculty, policy makers, and others an in-depth overview of the most up-to-date empirical, theoretical, and political contributions made by critical criminologists around the world. Special attention is devoted to new theoretical directions in the field, such as cultural criminology, masculinities studies, and feminist criminologies. Its diverse essays not only cover the history of critical criminology and cutting edge theories, but also the variety of research methods used by leading scholars in the field and the rich data generated by their rigorous empirical work. In addition, some of the chapters suggest innovative and realistic short- and long-term policy proposals that are typically ignored by mainstream criminology. These progressive strategies address some of the most pressing social problems facing contemporary society today, and that generate much pain and suffering for socially and economically disenfranchised people. The Handbook explores up-to-date empirical, theoretical, and political contributions, and is specifically designed to be a comprehensive resource for undergraduate and post-graduate students, researchers, and policy makers.
The Fourth Edition of this highly successful text moves readers beyond often-mistaken common-sense understandings of crime by providing a rich introduction to how major scholars analyze crime. Criminological Theory: Context and Consequences, Fourth Edition shows the real-world relevance of theory by illuminating how ideas about crime play a prominent role in shaping crime-control policies and compelling students to apply theories to the contemporary milieu.
This book presents the work of a new generation of critical criminologists who explore the geographical, institutional, and political contexts of the discipline in Canada. Breaking away from mainstream criminology and law-and-order discourses, the authors offer a spectrum of theoretical approaches to criminal justice -- from governmentality to feminist criminology, from critical realism to anarchism � and they propose novel approaches to topics ranging from genocide to white-collar crime. By posing crucial questions and attempting to define what criminology should be, this book will shape debates about crime, policing, and punishment for years to come.
In 1973 The New Criminology was published and quickly established itself as a key textbook in criminology, casting a major influence over a generation of scholars. It has remained in print ever since. This volume, published twenty-five years later, traces the major developments in the field including feminism, postmodernism, critical criminology and realism. The articles are by leading authorities from Britain, the United States and Australia and include Stan Cohen, Elliott Currie, Pat Carlen and Kerry Carrington as well as separate commentaries by the three original authors themselves: Ian Taylor, Paul Walton and Jock Young.
Designed for upper-level senior and graduate criminological theory courses, this text thoroughly examines the ideas and assumptions underlying each major theoretical perspective in criminology. It lays bare theorists' ideas about human nature, social structure, social order, concepts of law, crime and criminals, the logic of crime causation and the policies and criminal justice practices that follow from these premises. The book provides students with a clear critical, analytic overview of criminological theory that enable enformed evaluative comparisons among different theorists.
This textbook is designed to cover the major areas of debate within the fields of criminology, criminal justice and penology.
Criminology is in a period of much theoretical ferment. Older theories have been revitalized, and newer theories have been set forth. The very richness of our thinking about crime, however, leads to questions about the relative merits of these competing paradigms. Accordingly, in this volume advocates of prominent theories are asked to "take stock" of their perspectives. Their challenge is to assess the empirical status of their theory and to map out future directions for theoretical development. The volume begins with an assessment of three perspectives that have long been at the core of criminology: social learning theory, control theory, and strain theory. Drawing on these traditions, two major contemporary macro-level theories of crime have emerged and are here reviewed: institutional-anomie theory and collective efficacy theory. Critical criminology has yielded diverse contributions discussed in essays on feminist theories, radical criminology, peacemaking criminology, and the effects of racial segregation. The volume includes chapters examining Moffitt's insights on life-course persistent/adolescent-limited anti-social behavior and Sampson and Laub's life-course theory of crime. In addition, David Farrington provides a comprehensive assessment of the adequacy of the leading developmental and life-course theories of crime. Finally, Taking Stock presents essays that review the status of perspectives that have direct implications for the use of criminological knowledge to control crime. Taken together, these chapters provide a comprehensive update of the field's leading theories of crime. The volume will be of interest to criminological scholars and will be ideal for classroom use in courses reviewing contemporary theories of criminal behavior.
This book contains recent cutting-edge articles from leading criminological theorists. The contributors focus on theory rather than empirical research and describe the new theoretical directions of their respective approaches and how they envision the future development of their theories. Taken together the articles represent different multi-disciplinary perspectives and present a cross-section of contemporary criminological theory.
This book provides a short, comprehensive and accessible introduction to Ultra-Realism: a unique and radical school of criminological thought that has been developed by the authors over a number of years. After first outlining existing schools of thought, their major intellectual flaws and their underlying politics in a condensed guide that will be invaluable to all undergraduate and postgraduate students, Hall and Winlow introduce a number of important new concepts to criminology and suggest a new philosophical foundation, theoretical framework and research programme. These developments will enhance the discipline’s ability to explain human motivations, construct insightful representations of reality and answer the fundamental question of why some human beings risk inflicting harm on others to further their own interests or achieve various ends. Combining new philosophical and psychosocial approaches with a clear understanding of the shape of contemporary global crime, this book presents an intellectual alternative to the currently dominant paradigms of conservatism, neoclassicism and left-liberalism. In using an advanced conception of "harm", Hall and Winlow provide original explanations of criminal motivations and make the first steps towards a paradigm shift that will help criminology to illuminate the reality of our times. This book is essential reading for academics and students engaged in the study of criminology, sociology, criminological theory, social theory, the philosophy of social sciences and the history of crime.
This highly acclaimed criminology text presents an up-to-date review of rational choice theories, including deterrence, shaming, and routine activities. It also incorporates current examples of deterrence research regarding domestic violence, drunk driving, and capital punishment, and features thought-provoking discussion of the relativity of crime. The authors explore the crime problem, its context, and causes of crime. The organization of the text reflects the fact that the etiology of crime must be at the heart of criminology. It examines contemporary efforts to redefine crime by focusing on family violence, hate crimes, white-collar misconduct with violent consequences, and other forms of human behavior often neglected by criminologists. Extensive discussion of evolving laws is included, and while the prevalence of the scientific method in the field of criminology is highlighted, the impact of ideology on explanations of crime is the cornerstone of the book.
In this book, Kerry Carrington takes a bold, critical and reflexive approach to understanding the global divisions and inequalities that shape distinctive patterns of gender and crime. The book argues that in order for feminist criminology to enhance its conceptual and political relevance in the twenty-first century, bold new directions in scholarship on gender, crime and global justice are required that also take into account global divisions and inequalities. Issues explored in the book include the forced marriage of child brides, female genital mutilation, feminicide, honour crimes, rape and domestic violence, and the systemic denial of female rights justified by religion, custom or culture. It also explores rising rates of violence recorded for women offenders globally, and their increasing participation in terrorism, as well as troubling male-on-male violence in anomic spaces cultivated by globalising forces. Feminism and Global Justice argues that the world needs feminism more than ever to address systemic culturally shaped and diverse forms of injustice experienced by females across the globe, many of them children. It will be essential reading for international and national human rights organisations, as well as academics and students engaged in the study of criminology, development studies, sociology, politics, and gender studies.
Advancing Critical Criminology constitutes a timely addition to the growing body of knowledge on critical criminology scholarship. DeKeseredy and Perry have assembled a volume that provides scholars with an in-depth review of the extant literature on several major branches of criminology as well as examples of how critical criminologists apply their theoretical perspectives to substantive topics, such as drugs, interpersonal violence, and rural crime. Accordingly, this work is divided into two main sections: overviews of theories and applications. Each chapter provides a summary of work in a specific area, along with suggestions for moving the field forward. This reader is unique in its choice of topics, which have often been overlooked in the past. An expert collection of international scholars, Advancing Critical Criminology is certain to stimulate lively debates and generate further critical social scientific work in this field.
First Published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
"Provides up-to-date, in-depth summaries of the most important theories in criminology, from classic deterrence theory and social disorganization to modern labeling theory and integrated theory"--

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