The Amazon and Orinoco basins in northern South America are home to the highest concentration of freshwater fish species on earth, with more than 3,000 species allotted to 564 genera. Amazonian fishes include piranhas, electric eels, freshwater stingrays, a myriad of beautiful small-bodied tetras and catfishes, and the largest scaled freshwater fish in the world, the pirarucu. Field Guide to the Fishes of the Amazon, Orinoco, and Guianas provides descriptions and identification keys for all the known genera of fishes that inhabit Greater Amazonia, a vast and still mostly remote region of tropical rainforests, seasonally flooded savannas, and meandering lowland rivers. The guide’s contributors include more than fifty expert scientists. They summarize the current state of knowledge on the taxonomy, species richness, and ecology of these fish groups, and provide references to relevant literature for species-level identifications. This richly illustrated guide contains 700 detailed drawings, 190 color photos, and 500 distribution maps, which cover all genera. An extensive and illustrated glossary helps readers with the identification keys. The first complete overview of the fish diversity in the Amazon, Orinoco, and Guianas, this comprehensive guide is essential for anyone interested in the freshwater life inhabiting this part of the world. First complete overview of the fish diversity in the Amazon and Orinoco basins Contributors include more than fifty experts Identification keys and distribution maps for all genera 190 stunning color photos 700 detailed line drawings Extensive and illustrated glossary
This new third edition of Bradt's Guyana remains the only guidebook available to this South American gem, a jungle-clad country teeming with exotic wildlife. Thoroughly researched, easy to use and interesting to read, Bradt's Guyana is written and updated by writers who have lived in and promoted Guyana for many years and is an ideal companion for all travellers, from wildlife watchers to fishermen, anthropologists to conservationists and 'voluntourists'. Guyana is a destination on the rise, described - justifiably - by the tourist board as 'South America Undiscovered'. This new edition of Bradt's Guyana has been updated to include all the latest developments, ranging from how to see harpy eagles at Warapoka to new culinary experiences, local tour operators, 4x4 self-drive and new hotels. Truly off the beaten track, Guyana is one of the most fascinating and least-known countries in the Americas. It is also the only English-speaking country in South America. The jewel in its crown is the mouth-droppingly beautiful Kaieteur Falls, which is nearly five times the height of Niagara and the world's tallest single-drop waterfall. Culturally Caribbean, its capital Georgetown is a curious melting-pot of quaint Dutch and British colonial architecture, steel drums, boisterous nightlife, rum shops with world-class rum, cricket and tropical sea breezes. It is also the gateway to the lush interior which is full to the brim with fascinating flora and fauna including monkeys, black caiman, harpy eagles, giant anteaters, otters and the mighty jaguar. With Bradt's Guyana, discover all of this, plus where to stay in community lodges and see the rainforest through the eyes of Amerindian guides, where to watch turtles nesting on the beach, how to explore the moody Essequibo river (the largest between the Orinoco and the Amazon), and how to visit the million-acre rainforest reserve of Iwokrama for the ultimate authentic wildlife experience. This third edition of Bradt's Guyana is the key book to plan an expedition into its densely forested lush interior, often accessible only by boat or small aircraft, before taking some 'time to lime' in a hammock in one of its tropical waterfront resorts.
“Full of the details we ichthyologists love, this book will clearly be a standard reference on South American fishes for decades to come. The amazingly detailed glossary alone may well be worth the price of the book!” --Peter B. Moyle, author of Inland Fishes of California “A major contribution to our understanding of multiple aspects of the Neotropical freshwater fish fauna. The book will be of interest not only to ichthyologists, but also to a broader audience of researchers working on freshwater organisms and general biogeographic patterns.”--Richard P. Vari, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution “An up-to-date summary of our knowledge of a major continental biodiversity area, that should attract a wide variety of readers."--William Fink, University of Michigan “Successfully brings together disparate information and introduces new data and analyses, giving a vast overview of neotropical freshwater fishes.” --Brian Crother, Southeastern Louisiana University
Parmana: Prehistoric Maize and Manioc Subsistence along the Amazon and Orinoco argues for a reinterpretation of prehistoric subsistence in the Greater Amazonian region of South America. Based on the preliminary results of an archaeological fieldwork in Parmana of the Orinoco basin, Venezuela, the book re-evaluates some of the assumptions made by anthropologists about human adaptation and the development of aboriginal culture in Amazonia. Comprised of six chapters, this volume begins with a review of the theories of five scholars of aboriginal Amazonia in terms of logic and documentation: Julian Steward, Betty Meggers, Robert Carneiro, Donald Lathrap, and Daniel Gross. The next chapter presents an alternative theory, the hypothesis of technological change, and explains its theoretical framework. The demographic theory of cultural evolution is discussed, and its basis in general evolutionary theory is explained. Subsequent chapters focus on the empirical evidence for the hypothesis in studies of tropical resources, with emphasis on the productivity of tropical lowland soils and Amazonian faunal resources as well as the roles of maize and manioc in prehistoric Amazonian subsistence; the physical and biological characteristics of the Parmana region as an environment for prehistoric human adaptation; and the history of subsistence and population growth in prehistoric Parmana. The final chapter suggests possible directions for future research on the development of aboriginal culture in Amazonia. The book is illustrated with numerous maps, tables, and photographs, most of them never published before. This monograph should be of interest to archaeologists and anthropologists.
This volume examines the resource-use practices of eight tribal groups as well as of the caboclos, fishermen, & foragers in Amazonia & provides new insights for the conservation & wise use of local ecosystems.

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