Find your own personal Adam and Eve. Personal and oral history are evidence, but stronger still is DNA-driven genealogy. Make a time capsule, scrapbook or database of your family's founders. If you're interested in personal or oral history, DNA-driven genealogy, family history, ancestry, life stories, time capsules and tracing your own personal Adam and Eve, here's how to start researching your own family history at the cellular level when written records stop and oral history contributes to the evidence. What you're looking for in the search for your own origins and migrations is evidence. Every family has its own Adam and Eve-the original founders of a particular family line on either the male or female side. Find yours. Trace your ancestral founders through DNA-driven genealogy. Genealogists now can use molecular genealogy-comparing and matching people by matrilineal DNA lineages-mtDNA or patrilineal Y-chromosome ancestry and/or racial percentages tests. People interested in ancestry now look at genetic markers to trace the migrations of the human species. Here's how to trace your genealogy by DNA from your grandparents back 10,000 or more years. Anyone can be interested in DNA for ancestry research. Build a time capsule documenting, how your own family is a mosaic of communities. What markers will shed light on your deepest ancestry? Discover the geographic travels and dwelling places of some of your ancestors. What's random and what's not? Use these tools to study the history of your ancestors as part of a larger population. Look for similar patterns.
Secular and religious thinkers agree: the sexual revolution is one of the most important milestones in human history. Perhaps nothing has changed life for so many, so fast, as the severing of sex and procreation. But what has been the result? This ground-breaking book by noted essayist and author Mary Eberstadt contends that sexual freedom has paradoxically produced widespread discontent. Drawing on sociologists Pitirim Sorokin, Carle Zimmerman, and others; philosopher G.E.M. Anscombe and novelist Tom Wolfe; and a host of feminists, food writers, musicians, and other voices from across today's popular culture, Eberstadt makes her contrarian case with an impressive array of evidence. Her chapters range across academic disciplines and include supporting evidence from contemporary literature and music, women's studies, college memoirs, dietary guides, advertisements, television shows, and films. Adam and Eve after the Pill examines as no book has before the seismic social changes caused by the sexual revolution. In examining human behavior in the post-liberation world, Eberstadt provocatively asks: Is food the new sex? Is pornography the new tobacco? Adam and Eve after the Pill will change the way readers view the paradoxical impact of the sexual revolution on ideas, morals, and humanity itself.
Stephen Greenblatt—Pulitzer Prize– and National Book Award–winning author of The Swerve and Will in the World—investigates the life of one of humankind’s greatest stories. Bolder, even, than the ambitious books for which Stephen Greenblatt is already renowned, The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve explores the enduring story of humanity’s first parents. Comprising only a few ancient verses, the story of Adam and Eve has served as a mirror in which we seem to glimpse the whole, long history of our fears and desires, as both a hymn to human responsibility and a dark fable about human wretchedness. Tracking the tale into the deep past, Greenblatt uncovers the tremendous theological, artistic, and cultural investment over centuries that made these fictional figures so profoundly resonant in the Jewish, Christian, and Muslim worlds and, finally, so very “real” to millions of people even in the present. With the uncanny brilliance he previously brought to his depictions of William Shakespeare and Poggio Bracciolini (the humanist monk who is the protagonist of The Swerve), Greenblatt explores the intensely personal engagement of Augustine, Dürer, and Milton in this mammoth project of collective creation, while he also limns the diversity of the story’s offspring: rich allegory, vicious misogyny, deep moral insight, and some of the greatest triumphs of art and literature. The biblical origin story, Greenblatt argues, is a model for what the humanities still have to offer: not the scientific nature of things, but rather a deep encounter with problems that have gripped our species for as long as we can recall and that continue to fascinate and trouble us today.
Hidden deep below the surface of the story of Adam and Eve are 25 secrets to a happy, fulfilling marriage. Marriages become strained or fail when they're not aligned to the spiritual order of the universe. But with these easy-to-read secrets, every man and woman can master the art of aligning themselves to the laws of God's Garden -- to create their own personal Garden of Eden. Sensitively-written for today's Adams and Eves of all faiths and denominations, as well as those inspired by self-help or popular spiritual teachings, author Michael Shevack shows readers how to have a relationship that combines individual freedom, without restrictive roles, with the security of a traditional marriage. Spiritually eye-opening, yet immensely practical, including exercises to help readers consciously change old patterns, these marriage secrets include: Knowing Each Other's Boundaries and Honoring Them (Marriage Secret #16); Never, Ever Blame (Marriage Secret # 12); Think before You Act (Marriage Lesson #13); and Turn Away from Temptation (Marriage Lesson #18). Adam and Eve: Marriage Secrets from the Garden of Eden offers biblical truths in fresh, insightful ways to help couples solve problems quickly and stay joyfully married forever.
This book is about humanity and the realization that instead of a right to life, rather we receive the gift of life. Every gift involves a giver and a recipient. Who or what is the giver? As recipient, I can either accept or reject the gift. What does that mean? Am I a blip in the evolutionary process, or am I a creature burdened or blessed with a purpose in life? And what does that mean?
It is the first morning in the Garden of Eden as the creatures of the forest awaken to see something beautiful and different lying among them. As all the angels in the heavenly realm watch with great anticipation, the Creator breathes into the nostrils of the still body. Suddenly, the creature begins to move. Adam, who has been given life, is the first man and is created in the very image and likeness of God. After Adam comes to understand the gift of life and love with help from the Father, God takes him by the hand and shows him the garden paradise created just for him. As Adam and God part for the night, Adam lies down to sleep, marveling at the power of his Creator and the beauty surrounding him. On the seventh day, God introduces Adam to the fruits of the garden and a woman created from his very own rib. But just as Adam and Eve realize their love for each other, a black force emerges to test everything they know and understand about God’s love, life and nature. In this historical novel, actual and imagined events weave together to bring to light the meanings and truths behind the story of the first Adam. “The Adam Chronicles transports readers into a realm where they can see, feel, touch, and smell the beginning of God’s mighty journey with humankind.” ––Mark Winheld, Author and Literary Critic
Deepens and refreshes our view of early Christianity while casting a disturbing light on the evolution of the attitudes passed down to us. How did the early Christians come to believe that sex was inherently sinful? When did the Fall of Adam become synonymous with the fall of humanity? What turned Christianity from a dissident sect that championed the integrity of the individual and the idea of free will into the bulwark of a new imperial order—with the central belief that human beings cannot not choose to sin? In this provocative masterpiece of historical scholarship Elaine Pagels re-creates the controversies that racked the early church as it confronted the riddles of sexuality, freedom, and sin as embodied in the story of Genesis. And she shows how what was once heresy came to shape our own attitudes toward the body and the soul.
This teen time-travel thriller to prehistoric Africa is a thought-provoking parable that is both a gripping suspense story and a provocative looked at our species and its place on Earth. When Nick Brynner stumbles on a time wormhole and finds himself in a mysteriously deserted village, he is saved from a bizarre living gargoyle by fellow teen Eleanor Terrell. The two ultimately find themselves the tools of an alien race and in search of the genetic Adam and Eve among our prehistoric ancestors. The two are forced to become the reluctant guardians and judges of the future of humanity. "The Murder of Adam and Eve" is a survival story, coming-of-age story, love story, and a provocative suspense novel that wrestles with our planet's biggest questions - on the savanna where Man was born.
Since antiquity, one story has stood at the center of every conversation about men and women. One couple has been the battleground for human relationships and sexual identity. That couple is Adam and Eve. Yet instead of celebrating them, history has blamed them for bringing sin, deceit, and death into the world. In this fresh retelling of their story, New York Times columnist and PBS host Bruce Feiler travels from the Garden of Eden in Iraq to the Sistine Chapel in Rome, from John Milton's London to Mae West's Hollywood, discovering how Adam and Eve should be hailed as exemplars of a long-term, healthy, resilient relationship. At a time of discord and fear over the strength of our social fabric, Feiler shows how history's first couple can again be role models for unity, forgiveness, and love. Containing all the humor, insight, and wisdom that have endeared Bruce Feiler to readers around the world, The First Love Story is an unforgettable journey that restores Adam and Eve to their rightful place as central figures in our culture's imagination and reminds us that even our most familiar stories still have the ability to surprise, inspire, and guide us today.
Genomic science indicates that humans descend not from an individual pair but from a large population. What does this mean for the basic claim of many Christians: that humans descend from Adam and Eve? Leading evangelical geneticist Dennis Venema and popular New Testament scholar Scot McKnight combine their expertise to offer informed guidance and answers to questions pertaining to evolution, genomic science, and the historical Adam. Some of the questions they explore include: - Is there credible evidence for evolution? - Do we descend from a population or are we the offspring of Adam and Eve? - Does taking the Bible seriously mean rejecting recent genomic science? - How do Genesis's creation stories reflect their ancient Near Eastern context, and how did Judaism understand the Adam and Eve of Genesis? - Doesn't Paul's use of Adam in the New Testament prove that Adam was a historical individual? The authors address up-to-date genomics data with expert commentary from both genetic and theological perspectives, showing that genome research and Scripture are not irreconcilable. Foreword by Tremper Longman III and afterword by Daniel Harrell.
Few would argue that sex is a great preoccupation of humankind. In our private lives, sex can contribute to rewarding companionship, or conversely, the lack of it, to utter loneliness. With so much at stake, it is no wonder that sexuality is the most feared and repressed of our characteristics. In this fascinating book, eminent scientists Malcolm Potts and Roger Short attempt to make sense of our increasingly complicated sexual situation. For each of life's milestones--sexual intercourse, conception, pregnancy, birth, puberty, love, marriage, parenting, menopause, and death--they describe the biology behind our actions and consider how pressures imposed by various historical and contemporary cultures have further influenced our behavior. By looking at the past, they attempt to make sense of the present, to see how and why these cultural modifications arose, how they have contributed to the richness of human sexual behavior, and what our biological and cultural inheritance can teach us about safeguarding the continuation of our species. The authors examine how sex relates to diverse topics such as love, power, and mortality. The result is a lively and thought-provoking discussion of one of the most complex elements of the human condition. Malcolm Potts is the Bixby Professor at the Population and Family Planning School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of The Textbook of Contraceptive Practice (Cambridge 1983) and Abortion (Cambridge 1977). Roger Short is the Wexler Professorial Fellow in the Department of Perinatal Medicine at the University of Melbourne's Royal Women's Hospital. He is an editor of Reproduction of Mammals (Cambridge 1985).
This SBL Press reprint of an original Brill volume contains the first critical edition of the Life of Adam and Eve in Greek, based on all available manuscripts. In the introduction the history of previous research is summarized, and the extant manuscripts are presented. Next comes a description of the grammatical characteristics of the manuscripts' texts, followed by a detailed study of the genealogical relationships between them, resulting in a reconstruction of the writing's history of transmission in Greek. On the basis of all this information, the Greek text of the Life of Adam and Eve in its earliest attainable stage, is established. The text edition is accompanied by a full critical apparatus, in which all relevant evidence from the manuscripts is recorded. Several indices complete this volume.
2016 Christianity Today Biblical Studies Award of Merit For centuries the story of Adam and Eve has resonated richly through the corridors of art, literature and theology. But for most moderns, taking it at face value is incongruous. And even for many thinking Christians today who want to take seriously the authority of Scripture, insisting on a "literal" understanding of Genesis 2–3 looks painfully like a "tear here" strip between faith and science. How can Christians of good faith move forward? Who were the historical Adam and Eve? What if we've been reading Genesis—and its claims regarding material origins—wrong? In what cultural context was this couple, this garden, this tree, this serpent portrayed? Following his groundbreaking Lost World of Genesis One, John Walton explores the ancient Near Eastern context of Genesis 2–3, creating space for a faithful reading of Scripture along with full engagement with science for a new way forward in the human origins debate. As a bonus, an illuminating excursus by N. T. Wright places Adam in the implied narrative of Paul's theology. The Lost World of Adam and Eve will be required reading for anyone seeking to understand this foundational text historically and theologically, and wondering how to view it alongside contemporary understandings of human origins.
In his irreverent look at conventional religion, the great American humorist presents a thoughtful argument for the equality of the sexes. Special edition, richly illustrated by F. Strothmann and Lester Ralph.
Does preserving, recording, and writing family history memorabilia sow the seeds of adequacy and security for progeny because the advertising industry sells product by doing the opposite? Intergenerational writing is about recording salable life stories and family histories in a variety of formats: print, video, and multimedia, and in genres such as drama, poetry, music, novels, diaries, life stories, news features, and personal or corporate histories. Your purpose can be the following: closure and harmony, remembering good old times, making keepsake memorabilia. Writing and recording the highlights of peoples' lives is about who we are.
Why have people from different cultures and eras formulated myths and stories with similar structures? What does this similarity tell us about the mind, morality, and structure of the world itself? Jordan Peterson offers a provocative new hypothesis that explores the connection between what modern neuropsychology tells us about the brain and what rituals, myths, and religious stories have long narrated. A cutting-edge work that brings together neuropsychology, cognitive science, and Freudian and Jungian approaches to mythology and narrative, Maps of Meaning presents a rich theory that makes the wisdom and meaning of myth accessible to the critical modern mind.
The Biographical Bible offers an engaging overview of Scripture through the lens of the fascinating figures who populate its pages. Through insightful reflections on the lives of over eighty individuals, this unique book captures the essence of these colorful characters, warts and all. They are people who have much in common with twenty-first century people of faith. Here the reader will find a lively and insightful narrative that brings the Bible to life as no other book does.
Good theology takes the newest science seriously. In this book, new findings about human origins, like interbreeding with Neandertals and the re-dating of the first tools and cave art, are brought together with a Christian theological vision of humanity created through evolution for unity and completion in Christ. Opening chapters presents the latest scientific research. In clear and accessible writing, key findings from major science journals are turned into a story that begins seven million years when our lineage separated from the line that leads to chimpanzees. Since then, we have changed slowly but dramatically. Surprising new discoveries about Homo naledi and the Denisovans are all interpreted within the larger context of the emerging scientific consensus about the complex origins of our humanity. We have taken on many forms, spreading out across the Old World, then sometimes reconnecting in ways that move evolution along. As we change, we create simple stone tools, refine them slowly, and finally begin to create art and culture.Chapter 8 looks at some of the ways in which science and theology were both misused in the past to support racism and domination. Chapters 9 and 10 provide the culminating theological vision of the book. Chapter 9 asks how we can evolve in the image of God. Eight different approaches to the meaning of ?image of God? are offered, and the book suggests a new way to think about this key theme in light of the science of human origins. Static views of humanity are set aside, and it is argued that for humanity to be in the image of God is for us to be moving toward the fullness of our destiny in Christ. This is developed in two ways Chapter 10. First, Christ completes our humanity, bringing to finality what God has patiently created. Second, Christ makes us all one. In Christ, God is making humanity one by uniting all our past forms, all our present diversity, and all our future possibilities into one redeemed humanity. By drawing on the latest science, this book offers a traditional and yet contemporary Christian view of humanity.
For Better For Worse examines the institution of marriage in history and contemporary culture, along with kin concepts such as romantic love, sexuality, and family.

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