Presents a model of family assessment as a shared process which takes place between adoptive applicants and adoption workers, including a description of assessment tools that translate the ecological perspective into practice.
Recent research by Bristol University revealed that over one quarter of 3-11 year olds for whom adoption was in principle agreed were never placed with an adoptive family. Author Jennifer Cousins explores the important issue of recruiting new carers and welcoming a wide range of permanent families in order to help children who wait. Each of this guide's 10 chapters explores a key theme in an accessible, straightforward and highly readable style, such as recruiting widely, preparing and assessing applicants thoroughly and producing high quality material about children.
Finding Families, Finding Ourselves traces the history of adoption in English Canada from the nineteenth century to the 1990s. Each chapter directs readers to a particular set of individual stories - childrearing, legislation, class relations, gender, religion, ethnicity and race, Aboriginal-settler contact, international exchanges, and (re)connection - that shaped and informed the thinking and practices of adoption as they emerged over the years. Relying on public records rather than interviews, author Veronica Strong-Boag examines a number of diverse sources including legislation, the popular media, royal commissions reports, biographies and autobiographies, and fiction and poetry to provide an unexplored vantage point from which to assess the overall development of adoption as a central and all too often under-appreciated institution in English Canada.
Her family drove her nuts. As the only sane one in a group of crazy relatives and friends, Rachel Madison was calm, comforting…and desperatley needed someone to care for her. Her interior-design work was her refuge, and her latest client, Dr. Mark Thomas, a sexy solitary man, tempted her to go beyond a purely business relationship. Then a knock on Mark's door introduced him to a brother—and a family—he'd known nothing about. Suddenly his predictable world was askew—and only Rachel could ease his confusion. But dare she risk involvement with a man who didn't know his past…and who wondered about his future?
Sheena Sullivan Morelli and her sisters, Darcy and Regan, work to complete their Uncle Gavin’s challenge of turning his rundown hotel into a profitable operation within one year. Winning means earning a share in their uncle’s sizable estate. More than that, it determines how they’ll spend the rest of their lives. Sheena wants to stay on at the hotel, overseeing the hotel operation. But Darcy and Regan want to move on with their lives—Darcy writing a novel and Regan going into the interior decorating business with Mo. But life has other plans for them. And in the end, all three realize that the only thing that really matters is finding—and keeping—family.
Delana has never known her parents. Raised by her Aunt Tilley and a reclusive grandfather, Delana has led a sheltered existence, nurtured on her aunt's wild family histories. But when Aunt Tilley dies, Delana confronts her pent-up curiosities and embarks on a quest to unravel her aunt's fictions and draw out her mysterious grandfather. In searching for her true history, Delana finds herself, and a home in the one place she never thought to look. This moving fictional story is imagined from real antique photographs that author Tonya Bolden has collected. Bolden's well-researched historical details about 1905 Charleston, West Virginia lend authenticity, while spare, lyrical writing make this young girl's coming-of-age resonate.
What happens to a widow whose quiet life is interrupted when her estranged niece, Annie, arrives on her doorstep with three children and a dog of questionable breeding in tow? From the moment they blow into her life on a windy fall night and Krank the dog pees on her carpet, Lilly Irish begins a life-changing journey. Always one to do the right thing for the right reasons, Lilly takes the family in knowing her resources are limited. Between the dog tearing up one thing after another, and the older boy tangling with schoolyard toughs, Lilly is put to the test. Annie and her children are looking for a home. Will they find it with Lilly?
Dominic Mangini wanted what all 8-year-old boys want—time to laugh and play, loving parents, and enough food on the table. But in war-ravaged Sicily, food was scarce, and his parents were as scarred as the land. His father said they must move to America so they could start over and be a family once again. Dominic got a new start, and he got a new family—but not the kind of family he expected.
The first comprehensive book that offers invaluable step-by-step advice for families with donor-conceived children. Wendy Kramer, founder and director of the Donor Sibling Registry, and Naomi Cahn, family and reproductive law professor, have compiled a comprehensive and thorough guide for the growing community of families with donor-conceived children. Kramer and Cahn believe that all donor-conceived children’s desire to know their genetic family must be honored, and in Finding Our Families, they offer advice on how to foster healthy relationships within immediate families and their larger donor family networks based on openness and acceptance. With honesty and compassion, the authors offer thoughtful strategies and inspirational stories to help parents answer their own, and their children’s, questions and concerns that will surely arise, including: How to support your children’s curiosity and desire to know about their ancestry and genetic and medical background. How to help children integrate their birth story into a healthy self-image. How to help your children search for their donor or half siblings if and when they express interest in doing so. Finding Our Families opens up the lives of donor-conceived people who may be coping with uncertainty, thriving despite it, and finding novel ways to connect in this uncharted territory as they navigate the challenges and rewards of the world of donor conception.
In the spring of 1983, a North American couple who were hoping to adopt a child internationally received word that if they acted quickly, they could become the parents of a boy in an orphanage in Honduras. Layers of red tape dissolved as the American Embassy there smoothed the way for the adoption. Within a few weeks, Margaret Ward and Thomas de Witt were the parents of a toddler they named Nelson—an adorable boy whose prior life seemed as mysterious as the fact that government officials in two countries had inexplicably expedited his adoption. In Missing Mila, Finding Family, Margaret Ward tells the poignant and compelling story of this international adoption and the astonishing revelations that emerged when Nelson's birth family finally relocated him in 1997. After recounting their early years together, during which she and Tom welcomed the birth of a second son, Derek, and created a family with both boys, Ward vividly recalls the upheaval that occurred when members of Nelson's birth family contacted them and sought a reunion with the boy they knew as Roberto. She describes how their sense of family expanded to include Nelson's Central American relatives, who helped her piece together the lives of her son's birth parents and their clandestine activities as guerrillas in El Salvador's civil war. In particular, Ward develops an internal dialogue with Nelson's deceased mother Mila, an elusive figure whose life and motivations she tries to understand.
A dashing doctor hires the perfect nanny for his son, not realizing she's about to turn his entire world upside down! Don't miss the latest story in The Bachelors of Blackwater Lake by Teresa Southwick! Kidnapped as an infant, Emma Robbins has come to Blackwater Lake to seek out her birth family. But she can't exactly just knock on their door and introduce herself! To bide her time, she fakes her identity and takes a job as a nanny for an adorable one-year old boy—and his incredibly sexy doctor daddy. Now she's really gotten more than she bargained for…. Dr. Justin Flint has sworn off women since his divorce. And while she's the perfect caretaker for his little boy, having Emma under his roof is just way too tempting for the single dad! When an explosive kiss shatters their professional resolve, their mutual passion is revealed. But will their new affection distract Emma from her goal—or make her realize she's found her once and future family?
This document was issued by We Can! (Ways to Enhance Children¿s Activity and Nutrition), a public outreach program designed to help children 8-13 years old stay at a healthy weight through improving food choices, increasing physical activity, and reducing computer screen time. The program is a collaboration of 4 Institutes of the Nat. Institutes of Health (NIH). Contents: Why Should We Care About Our Weight?; What Can My Family and I Do to Encourage a Healthy Weight?; Energy Balance: The Heart of the Matter; Energy IN: Focusing on Food Choices and Portion Size; Energy OUT: Physical Activity and Screen Time; and Resources. Illustrations.
In Recording Oral History, Second Edition, Valerie Raleigh Yow builds on the foundation of her classic text with a fully updated and substantially expanded new edition. One of the most widely used and highly regarded textbooks ever published in the field, Yow's updated edition now includes new material on using the internet, an examination of the interactions between oral history and memory processes, and analysis of testimony and the interpretation of meanings in different contexts. It will interest researchers and students in a wide variety of disciplines including history, sociology, anthropology, education, psychology, social work, and ethnographic methods.
In 1924 when thirty-two-year-old Edmond Landry kissed his family good-bye and left for the leprosarium in Carville, Louisiana, leprosy, now referred to as Hansen's Disease, stigmatized and disfigured but did not kill. Those with leprosy were incarcerated in the federal hospital and isolated from family and community. Phones were unavailable, transportation was precarious, and fear was rampant. Edmond entered the hospital (as did his four other siblings), but he did not surrender to his fate. He fought with his pen and his limited energy to stay connected to his family and to improve living conditions for himself and other patients. Claire Manes, Edmond's granddaughter, lived much of her life gripped by the silence surrounding her grandfather. When his letters were discovered, she became inspired to tell his story through her scholarship and his writing. Out of the Shadow of Leprosy: The Carville Letters and Stories of the Landry Family presents her grandfather's letters and her own studies of narrative and Carville during much of the twentieth century. The book becomes a testament to Edmond's determination to maintain autonomy and dignity in the land of the living dead. Letters and stories of the other four siblings further enhance the picture of life in Carville from 1919 to 1977.
He's having a hard time managing on his own... so how did asking his neighbor for a favor get so complicated? Being unexpectedly tasked with caring for his adorable ten-month-old niece is more than Detective Joel Wolfsley can handle. He's on sick leave with one leg in a cast after a drug dealer mowed him down with a car. But Joel's a sucker for his sister—all four of his sisters—and the munchkin's mom needs his help. Thing is, Joel needs help, too. Isn't that what next door neighbors are for? One look at the tough-talking "Big Bad Wolf" cradling a baby in his arms and kennel owner Willa Darling knows he's all bark, no bite. Joel might need assistance chasing after his niece, but he's completely capable otherwise, and a family man at heart. Which means that in spite of the tension that simmers between them while caring for the infant, Willa will have to let him go. How can she do anything else when he's not the family man she'd thought?
He's having a hard time deciding between getting close to her...or walking away for good. Eden Karr never expected to find herself living alone in the small town of Arbor Glen, Texas, the proprietress of her own clothing boutique, and expecting twins but it's not a bad life. She has her work. She has wonderful friends. And now she has a carpenter who does a lot for those "eat a worm" days that she's trying her best to shake off. Problem is, things seem so much easier when he's around and she knows better than to rely on anyone but herself. Jace Morgan thought he had his act together. He likes being his own boss. He likes working with his hands. Carpentry isn't quite the same as architecture but it's close enough that he doesn't dwell on all that he's lost. What he doesn't like is waking up every morning and thinking about Eden Karr and the way she makes him smile. Or the way she almost makes him forget what brought him to this point in his life and that can't happen. Because forgetting cuts too close to forgiving.

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