Easy to read and hard to put down, Finding Family is the first book to chronicle the paradigm-shifting application of genetic genealogy to adoption search. Whether you're searching for your own roots or just craving a darn good read, Finding Family is a book you will likely devour in one sitting...and wholeheartedly recommend to others.
Delana has never known her parents. Raised by her Aunt Tilley and a reclusive grandfather, Delana has led a sheltered existence, nurtured on her aunt's wild family histories. But when Aunt Tilley dies, Delana confronts her pent-up curiosities and embarks on a quest to unravel her aunt's fictions and draw out her mysterious grandfather. In searching for her true history, Delana finds herself, and a home in the one place she never thought to look. This moving fictional story is imagined from real antique photographs that author Tonya Bolden has collected. Bolden's well-researched historical details about 1905 Charleston, West Virginia lend authenticity, while spare, lyrical writing make this young girl's coming-of-age resonate.
Sheena Sullivan Morelli and her sisters, Darcy and Regan, work to complete their Uncle Gavin’s challenge of turning his rundown hotel into a profitable operation within one year. Winning means earning a share in their uncle’s sizable estate. More than that, it determines how they’ll spend the rest of their lives. Sheena wants to stay on at the hotel, overseeing the hotel operation. But Darcy and Regan want to move on with their lives—Darcy writing a novel and Regan going into the interior decorating business with Mo. But life has other plans for them. And in the end, all three realize that the only thing that really matters is finding—and keeping—family.
In the spring of 1983, a North American couple who were hoping to adopt a child internationally received word that if they acted quickly, they could become the parents of a boy in an orphanage in Honduras. Layers of red tape dissolved as the American Embassy there smoothed the way for the adoption. Within a few weeks, Margaret Ward and Thomas de Witt were the parents of a toddler they named Nelson—an adorable boy whose prior life seemed as mysterious as the fact that government officials in two countries had inexplicably expedited his adoption. In Missing Mila, Finding Family, Margaret Ward tells the poignant and compelling story of this international adoption and the astonishing revelations that emerged when Nelson's birth family finally relocated him in 1997. After recounting their early years together, during which she and Tom welcomed the birth of a second son, Derek, and created a family with both boys, Ward vividly recalls the upheaval that occurred when members of Nelson's birth family contacted them and sought a reunion with the boy they knew as Roberto. She describes how their sense of family expanded to include Nelson's Central American relatives, who helped her piece together the lives of her son's birth parents and their clandestine activities as guerrillas in El Salvador's civil war. In particular, Ward develops an internal dialogue with Nelson's deceased mother Mila, an elusive figure whose life and motivations she tries to understand.
In this interdisciplinary collaboration, an international group of scholars have come together to suggest new directions for the study of the family in Scotland circa 1300-1750. Contributors apply tools from across a range of disciplines including art history, literature, music, gender studies, anthropology, history and religious studies to assess creatively the broad range of sources which inform our understanding of the pre-modern Scottish family. A central purpose of this volume is to encourage further studies in this area by highlighting the types of sources available, as well as actively engaging in broader historiographical debates to demonstrate how important and effective family studies are to advancing our understanding of the past. Articles in the first section demonstrate the richness and variety of sources that exist for studies of the Scottish family. These essays clearly highlight the uniqueness, feasibility and value of family studies for pre-industrial Scotland. The second and third sections expand upon the arguments made in part one to demonstrate the importance of family studies for engaging in broader historiographical issues. The focus of section two is internal to the family. These articles assess specific family roles and how they interact with broader social forces/issues. In the final section the authors explore issues of kinship ties (an issue particularly associated with popular images of Scotland) to examine how family networks are used as a vehicle for social organization.
Finding Family uses a continuing storyline to provide a rich, high-interest context that helps students use all language skills. The story focuses on the lives of six immigrant students and their teacher, Veronica. The storyline contains authentic situations (feelings about leaving home, separation from family, adjusting to a new culture, making new friends, falling in love, and finding “family”) that immigrants in the United States face, allowing students to immediately identify with these situations and prompt them to consider their own lives. These are stories of resilience and twists of fate, of working hard and finding help where you least expect it. The stories, together with the discussion activities, comprehension tasks, and vocabulary exercises, provide rich opportunities for extension and application to the lives of students who use the book. Although the readings and vocabulary are a big part of each chapter, this textbook provides ample speaking and writing practice.
All families eventually face the loss of a loved one. When it happens, it can place great strain on a marriage, as well as on other relationships. That's partly because we don't know what to do with our feelings and partly because every family member grieves in his or her own way. In this book, Nancy and David Guthrie explore the family dynamics involved when a loved one dies—and debunk some myths about family grief. Through their own experiences of losing two young children and interviews with those who've faced losing spouses and parents, they show how grief can actually pull a family closer together rather than tearing it apart.
Revised and updated from the original, this honest and forthwright look at families of all shapes and sizes will help you down the path of healing (whether you know you need it or whether yo're just not sure). Unlocking Your Family Patterns combines decades worth of counseling wisdom and pastoral care insights into this one practical resource. Your past may hurt, and your family's patterns may have left emotional scars, but your future has not been laid in stone yet. There is hope for healing, there are lessons to learn, and there are paths toward family health. Using clinical, biblical and practical examples to help you uncover the patterns your family has lived in, this book might lead you toward the family u-turn you've been looking for.
What happens to a widow whose quiet life is interrupted when her estranged niece, Annie, arrives on her doorstep with three children and a dog of questionable breeding in tow? From the moment they blow into her life on a windy fall night and Krank the dog pees on her carpet, Lilly Irish begins a life-changing journey. Always one to do the right thing for the right reasons, Lilly takes the family in knowing her resources are limited. Between the dog tearing up one thing after another, and the older boy tangling with schoolyard toughs, Lilly is put to the test. Annie and her children are looking for a home. Will they find it with Lilly?
Presents a model of family assessment as a shared process which takes place between adoptive applicants and adoption workers, including a description of assessment tools that translate the ecological perspective into practice.
Dominic Mangini wanted what all 8-year-old boys want—time to laugh and play, loving parents, and enough food on the table. But in war-ravaged Sicily, food was scarce, and his parents were as scarred as the land. His father said they must move to America so they could start over and be a family once again. Dominic got a new start, and he got a new family—but not the kind of family he expected.
Searching for her birth family, Emma Robbins arrives in Blackwater Lake, Montana and becomes the nanny to the son of Dr. Justin Flint, a divorced doctor who, having avoided relationships since his divorce, now reconsiders while thinking of a future with Emma.
One of five Depression-era sisters from rural Maine recounts how she and her siblings were taken away from their alcoholic father after the death of their mother, describes her career ambitions and struggles with depression, and relates her quest to discover her mother's history.
Her family drove her nuts. As the only sane one in a group of crazy relatives and friends, Rachel Madison was calm, comforting…and desperatley needed someone to care for her. Her interior-design work was her refuge, and her latest client, Dr. Mark Thomas, a sexy solitary man, tempted her to go beyond a purely business relationship. Then a knock on Mark's door introduced him to a brother—and a family—he'd known nothing about. Suddenly his predictable world was askew—and only Rachel could ease his confusion. But dare she risk involvement with a man who didn't know his past…and who wondered about his future?
After the Civil War, African Americans placed poignant "information wanted" advertisements in newspapers, searching for missing family members. Inspired by the power of these ads, Heather Andrea Williams uses slave narratives, letters, interviews, public records, and diaries to guide readers back to devastating moments of family separation during slavery when people were sold away from parents, siblings, spouses, and children. Williams explores the heartbreaking stories of separation and the long, usually unsuccessful journeys toward reunification. Examining the interior lives of the enslaved and freedpeople as they tried to come to terms with great loss, Williams grounds their grief, fear, anger, longing, frustration, and hope in the history of American slavery and the domestic slave trade. Williams follows those who were separated, chronicles their searches, and documents the rare experience of reunion. She also explores the sympathy, indifference, hostility, or empathy expressed by whites about sundered black families. Williams shows how searches for family members in the post-Civil War era continue to reverberate in African American culture in the ongoing search for family history and connection across generations.
Beginner's guide to finding your family history online. --back cover.
Unlock the Secrets of Your Old Family Photos! Historical family photos are cherished heirlooms that offer a glimpse into the lives of our ancestors. But the images, and the stories behind them, often fade away as decades pass - the who, when, where and why behind the photos are lost. In this book, photo identification expert and genealogist Maureen A. Taylor shows you how to study the clues in your old family photos to put names to faces and recapture their lost stories. Inside, you'll learn how to: Determine the type of image you have - from common paper prints to stereographs to historical daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, and tintypes Use clothing, accessories, and hairstyles to date the image in the correct decade Research photographer's imprints to narrow down when and where the photo was taken Compare facial features in multiple photos to confirm identity and family resemblance Interview family members to gather more information about the image Identify props in the photo to create context for the image Each chapter includes dozens of historical photos to illustrate key points and provide clear examples. Charts, timelines and resource lists make it easy to find the exact information you need. Dozens of case studies show you how to apply the techniques in the book to real-life photo research projects. The answers to your family photo questions are closer than you think. Let this book help you start finding them today.
Born in Spain and raised by a struggling single mother, Lisa Lovatt-Smith became an editor at British Vogue at nineteen, the youngest in Condé Nast history. She helped launch Spanish Vogue and partied across Europe with celebrities, fashion designers, photographers, and supermodels. By her thirties, Lisa has her dream career and a glamorous life in Paris, but when her adopted daughter Sabrina is expelled from school, Lisa takes her to volunteer in a Ghanaian orphanage in the hopes of getting her back on track. What she discovers there changes both their lives for good. Appalled by the deplorable conditions she finds, Lisa moves to Ghana permanently and founds OAfrica, dedicating her personal resources to reuniting hundreds of Ghanaian children with their families and spearheading a drive to shut down corrupt orphanages. On this unforgettable journey, Lisa confronts death threats, malaria, arson, and heartbreaking poverty; she also discovers truly inspiring children trapped in limbo by a moneymaking scheme bigger than she ever imagined. Who Knows Tomorrow is the engaging, frank, and often surprisingly funny story of one amazing woman who has traveled the globe in search of meaningful connection. Although to Lisa her story will always be about the children, it’s also a touching celebration of a woman who is talented, generous, and unfailingly courageous.

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