Finding the Hero in Your Husband is an essential tool for understanding the Christian concept of submission-a frequently misunderstood and often contentious subject. Dr. Slattery combines Christian principles, her professional expertise as a psychologist, and personal experience as a wife in this indispensable book to help women improve their marriages. When expectations of trust and intimacy go unfulfilled, a wife's anger and fear can result in unhealthy domination and control. The power of a woman's approval and perspective in a relationship cannot be underestimated; it must be directed in ways that promote intimacy instead of destroying it. Dr. Slattery advocates that the key to a successful Christian marriage is a wife's ability to encourage her husband to develop his leadership role in the marriage and her ability to avoid boredom in the bedroom. (The Journal of the American Medical Association reports that 43 percent of women and 31 percent of men are sexually dysfunctional.) In Finding the Hero in Your Husband, Dr. Slattery uses illustrative case studies and scriptural guidelines to answer many essential questions and explain difficult and sometimes unpopular but relevant concepts to help Christian women improve their relationships. Each chapter concludes with questions for reflection and discussion, making it ideal for both individual reading and group study.
This book focuses on New York City-based actors and comedians who are self-acknowledged heroin users. Barry Spunt examines a number of hypotheses about the reasons why actors and comedians use heroin as well as the impact of heroin on performance, creativity, and career trajectory. A primary concern of the book is the role that subculture and identity play in helping us to understand the heroin use of these entertainers. Spunt captures the voices of actors and comedians through narrative accounts from a variety of secondary sources. He also examines how New York-based films about heroin relate to the major themes of his research.
Amy Caruso was a junior in the nursing program at Boston College and seemed to have everything going for her—brains, beauty, athleticism, career goals, a loving family, and many wonderful friends. But in November of 2009, she admitted she was a heroin addict and voluntarily entered treatment. Five weeks later, she died from an overdose at the treatment facility on the day after Christmas, weeks shy of her twenty-first birthday. Melissa Weiksnar wrote Heroin's Puppet so parents, educators, clinicians, and young people can learn from her daughter's six-year battle with substances, especially from the journals Amy wrote while in rehab.
It was the era of Hawke and Keating, Kylie and INXS, the America’s Cup and the Bicentenary. It was perhaps the most controversial decade in Australian history, with high-flying entrepreneurs booming and busting, torrid debates over land rights and immigration, the advent of AIDS, a harsh recession and the rise of the New Right. It was a time when Australians fought for social change – on union picket lines, at rallies for women’s rights and against nuclear weapons, and as part of a new environmental movement. And then there were the events that left many scratching their heads: Joh for Canberra . . . the Australia Card . . . Cliff Young. In The Eighties, Frank Bongiorno brings all this and more to life. He uncovers forgotten stories – of factory workers proud of their skills who found themselves surplus to requirements; of Vietnamese families battling to make new lives for themselves in the suburbs. He sheds new light on ‘both the ordinary and extraordinary things that happened to Australia and Australians during this liveliest of decades’. The Eighties is contemporary history at its best. ‘Frank Bongiorno has successfully negotiated the minefield of Australia’s political egos to write the definitive account of an inspired, infuriating decade.’ – George Megalogenis
Accompanying China’s economic reform and open-door policy in 1978, illicit drug use emerged in the late 1980s, and gradually developed into a serious social problem. Heroin was the dominant illicit drug consumed in the new drug epidemic, and the number of female heroin users has increased rapidly in the country. While heroin use in China is soaring, little is known about women’s heroin use in the context of China’s rapidly changing society. Using intensive interviews with 131 female heroin users, this book explores the careers of female heroin users in China under changing social contexts in the reform era. It investigates the impacts of sociological and individual factors on women’s heroin use in each developing stage of their drug use careers. It also examines the social consequences of women’s heroin use by looking at connections between women’s heroin use and criminality, and the change in women’s social relations after heroin use. Lastly, the book analyzes and ascertains the impact of current narcotics control policies on women’s drug use careers. This groundbreaking book has important policy implications for both China and the international society in the context of increasing global concern about women’s substance abuse.
Homicide detective Devon Jensen is investigating the link between the murder of his childhood friend and two rival drug families. He finds himself fighting to save his own life and the life of the woman he has grown to love.
The Lone Brit on 13 is a gripping true story of violence, degradation and adventure penned in the confines of a grim Malaga prison cell. Imprisoned for drug-smuggling, the lone Brit on Wing 13, Chance, reveals the horrors he experienced among cut-throat villains and screws in the netherworld of the Spanish prison system.Chance takes to writing in his dank prison cell in an attempt to escape his surroundings and recalls various episodes in his life: his time serving as a soldier in Thailand and Malaysia; his involvement with the 3 Para snatch-squad in the 1970s Belfast; and his subsequent descent into drug dealing and trafficking, which culminated in a high-speed boat chase and his imprisonment in a top-security Spanish prison. While inside, Chance fought his way to the surface of a cesspool of iniquitous scumbags using his fists: the only effective means of being understood in an environment of desecrated morality and non-existent integrity. With predators lurking everywhere, Chance had to be constantly on guard and in order to survive he had to be mentally prepared to inflict the necessary violent retribution on any would-be attacker or racist thug. As the sole British inmate, Chance was a prime target for the intimidating Spanish hardmen who thrived on cruelty and treachery. But his martial arts skills and Samurai philosophy proved to be more than a match for the aggressors. Once a respected and successful businessman admired by his peers - he had operated his own martial arts business in Spain before being jailed - Chance took one wrong turn in life and lost everything except the love and support of his loyal wife.
EAT, PRAY, LOVE meets Hape Kerkeling Gerade 26 geworden, hat Cheryl Strayed das Gefühl, alles verloren zu haben. Drogen und Männer trösten sie über den Tod ihrer Mutter und das Scheitern ihrer Ehe hinweg. Als ihr ein Outdoor-Führer über den Pacific Crest Trail in die Hände fällt, trifft sie die folgenreichste Entscheidung ihres Lebens: mehr als tausend Meilen zu wandern. Die berührende Geschichte einer Selbstfindung – voller Witz, Weisheit und Intensität, mit einer respektlosen Heldin, die man lieben muss.
From crime stories in the classic hard-boiled style to the vividly experimental, from the determination of those risking everything to the desperation of those with nothing left to lose, Detroit Noir delivers unforgettable tales that capture the city’s dark vitality. Includes stories by: Joyce Carol Oates, Loren D. Estleman, Craig Holden, P.J. Parrish, Desiree Cooper, Nisi Shawl, M.L. Liebler, Craig Bernier, Joe Boland, Megan Abbott, Dorene O’Brien, Lolita Hernandez, Peter Markus, Roger K. Johnson, Michael Zadoorian, and E.J. Olsen.
Von den Bergen Idahos nach Cambridge – der unwahrscheinliche »Bildungsweg« der Tara Westover. Tara Westover ist 17 Jahre alt, als sie zum ersten Mal eine Schulklasse betritt. Zehn Jahre später kann sie eine beeindruckende akademische Laufbahn vorweisen. Aufgewachsen im ländlichen Amerika, befreit sie sich aus einer ärmlichen, archaischen und von Paranoia und Gewalt geprägten Welt durch – Bildung, durch die Aneignung von Wissen, das ihr so lange vorenthalten worden war. Die Berge Idahos sind Taras Heimat, sie lebt als Kind im Einklang mit der grandiosen Natur, mit dem Wechsel der Jahreszeiten – und mit den Gesetzen, die ihr Vater aufstellt. Er ist ein fundamentalistischer Mormone, vom baldigen Ende der Welt überzeugt und voller Misstrauen gegenüber dem Staat, von dem er sich verfolgt sieht. Tara und ihre Geschwister gehen nicht zur Schule, sie haben keine Geburtsurkunden, und ein Arzt wird selbst bei fürchterlichsten Verletzungen nicht gerufen. Und die kommen häufig vor, denn die Kinder müssen bei der schweren Arbeit auf Vaters Schrottplatz helfen, um über die Runden zu kommen. Taras Mutter, die einzige Hebamme in der Gegend, heilt die Wunden mit ihren Kräutern. Nichts ist dieser Welt ferner als Bildung. Und doch findet Tara die Kraft, sich auf die Aufnahmeprüfung fürs College vorzubereiten, auch wenn sie quasi bei null anfangen muss ... Wie Tara Westover sich aus dieser Welt befreit, überhaupt erst einmal ein Bewusstsein von sich selbst entwickelt, um den schmerzhaften Abnabelungsprozess von ihrer Familie bewältigen zu können, das beschreibt sie in diesem ergreifenden und wunderbar poetischen Buch. » Befreit wirft ein Licht auf einen Teil unseres Landes, den wir zu oft übersehen. Tara Westovers eindringliche Erzählung — davon, einen Platz für sich selbst in der Welt zu finden, ohne die Verbindung zu ihrer Familie und ihrer geliebten Heimat zu verlieren — verdient es, weithin gelesen zu werden.« J.D. Vance Autor der »Hillbilly-Elegie«
Die Autobiografie der legendären Jazzsängerin Billie Holiday! "Man hat mir gesagt, dass niemand das Wort ›Hunger‹ so singt wie ich. Genauso das Wort ›Liebe‹. Vielleicht liegt das daran, dass ich weiß, was diese Worte bedeuten. Vielleicht liegt das daran, dass ich stolz genug bin, mich an all das erinnern zu wollen, an Baltimore und Welfare Island, das katholische Heim und das Jefferson-Gericht, an den Sheriff vor unserm Haus in Harlem und die Städte in ganz Amerika, wo ich meine Beulen und Narben abbekommen habe, Philadelphia und Alderson, Hollywood und San Francisco, an jede Kleinigkeit. Alle Cadillacs und Nerze der Welt - und ich hatte von beiden schon einige - können das nicht aufwiegen oder vergessen machen. Alles was ich je von den Menschen gelernt habe, liegt in diesen beiden Worten. Zuerst braucht man etwas zu essen und ein bisschen Liebe, bevor man sich die Predigt von irgendjemandem über richtiges Verhalten anhören kann. Alles, was ich bin und was ich vom Leben will, sagen diese beiden Wörter."

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