The first edition of Finnish Lessons won the prestigious Grawemeyer Award in Education in 2013. It was featured inThe New York Times, The Washington Post, The New York Review of Books, The Atlantic, The Guardian, CNN, Education Week, The Huffington Post, and Dan Rather Reports and has been translated into 16 languages. Now, with Finnish Lessons 2.0, Pasi Sahlberg has thoroughly updated his groundbreaking account of how Finland built a world-class education system during the past four decades. In this international bestseller, Sahlberg traces the evolution of Finnish education policies and highlights how they differ from the United States and much of the rest of the world. Featuring substantial additions throughout the text, Finnish Lessons 2.0 demonstrates how systematically focusing on teacher and leader professionalism, building trust between the society and its schools, and investing in educational equity rather than competition, choice, and other market-based reforms make Finnish schools an international model of success. This second edition details the complexity of meaningful change by examining Finland’s educational performance in light of the most recent international assessment data and domestic changes. This second edition details the complexity of meaningful change by illustrating Finland’s educational performance in light of the most recent international assessment data, including PISA 2012, TIMSS 2011, PIAAC 2013, and TALIS 2013. In the midst of continuous local reforms and global changes, Finnish Lessons 2.0 encourages educators, students, and policymakers to look beyond their own borders as they seek successful solutions for their education systems, districts, and schools. “Reminds us that a nation can consciously build an admirable school system if it pays close attention to the needs of children; if it selects and prepares its educators well; and if it builds educational communities that are not only physically attractive but conducive to the joys of teaching and learning.” —From the Foreword by Diane Ravitch, author of Reign of Error “Solidifies Sahlberg’s reputation as the most thoughtful international educational researcher of our generation.” —David Berliner, Regents' Professor Emeritus, Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, Arizona State University “Whether or not you have read Finnish Lessons, you should read and ponder this new edition right away.” —Howard Gardner, author of Truth, Beauty, and Goodness Reframed
“It is now time to break down the ideology of exceptionalism in the United States and other Anglo-American nations if we are to develop reforms that will truly inspire our teachers to improve learning for all our students—especially those who struggle the most. In that essential quest, Pasi Sahlberg is undoubtedly one of the very best teachers of all.” —From the Foreword by Andy Hargreaves, Lynch School of Education, Boston College Finnish Lessons is a first-hand, comprehensive account of how Finland built a world-class education system during the past three decades. The author traces the evolution of education policies in Finland and highlights how they differ from the United States and other industrialized countries. He shows how rather than relying on competition, choice, and external testing of students, education reforms in Finland focus on professionalizing teachers’ work, developing instructional leadership in schools, and enhancing trust in teachers and schools. This book details the complexity of educational change and encourages educators and policymakers to develop effective solutions for their own districts and schools.
Pasi Sahlberg has thoroughly updated his groundbreaking account of how Finland built a world-class education system during the past four decades. In this international bestseller, Sahlberg traces the evolution of Finnish education policies and highlights how they differ from the United States and much of the rest of the world. Featuring substantial additions throughout the text, Finnish Lessons 2.0 demonstrates how systematically focusing on teacher and leader professionalism, building trust between the society and its schools, and investing in educational equity rather than competition, choice, and other market-based reforms make Finnish schools an international model of success. This second edition details the complexity of meaningful change by examining Finlands educational performance in light of the most recent international assessment data and domestic changes.
In this book, noted Nordic researchers and teacher educators provide insights into early childhood discourses and practices in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. In addition to these insiders' perspectives, an American scholars explore Nordic themes, trends, and practices as they emerge in the book's chapters on such varied topics as Nordic childhoods, children's perspectives, preschool teacher education reforms and developments, transition from preschool to primary school, learning through play, caregiving and instruction.
Easy-to-implement classroom lessons from the world’s premier educational system. Finland shocked the world when its fifteen-year-olds scored highest on the first Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), a set of tests touted for evaluating critical-thinking skills in math, science, and reading. That was in 2001; but even today, this tiny Nordic nation continues to amaze. How does Finnish education—with short school days, light homework loads, and little standardized testing—produce students who match the PISA scores of high-powered, stressed-out kids in Asia? When Timothy D. Walker started teaching fifth graders at a Helsinki public school, he began a search for the secrets behind the successes of Finland’s schools. Walker wrote about several of those discoveries, and his Atlantic articles on this subject became hot topics of conversation. Here, he gathers all he learned and reveals how any teacher can implement many of Finland's best practices. Remarkably, Finland is prioritizing the joy of learning in its newest core curricula and Walker carefully highlights specific strategies that support joyful K-12 classrooms and integrate seamlessly with educational standards in the United States. From incorporating brain breaks to offering a peaceful learning environment, this book pulls back the curtain on the joyful teaching practices of the world's most lauded school system. His message is simple but profound: these Finland-inspired strategies can be used in the U.S. and other countries. No educator—or parent of a school-aged child—will want to miss out on the message of joy and change conveyed in this book.
Part of a series, with a main volume by Linda Darling-Hammond and Dion Burns: EMPOWERED EDUCATORS: HOW HIGH-PERFORMING SYSTEMS SHAPE TEACHING QUALITY AROUND THE WORLD. This work delves into a number of high-performing educational systems, and describes how they create a coherent set of policies designed to ensure quality teaching in all communities. The authors also closely examine how these policies are translated into practice. The series spans systems across three continents and five countries. Upon the occasion of the birth of a new baby in Finland, since the 1930s, the Finnish government has been providing every new mother with a cardboard box filled with clothes, sheets, toys, diapers, and other essential items. The box even includes a small mattress, and the box can actually (and often does for many newborns) serve as a simple crib. The intention of the box is to ensure that all children in Finland have an equal start; but it serves also as a symbol of the centrality of equity and children in Finland. In EMPOWERED EDUCATORS IN FINLAND, the authors explore Finland's unique teacher preparation approach and other aspects of the educational system that contribute to the capacity of the country to create a strong and quality teacher workforce. There are many lessons to learn, as the country is producing strong student results on international tests such as OECD’s PISA.
Learning from Singapore tells the inside story of the country’s journey in transforming its education system from a struggling one to one that is hailed internationally as effective and successful. It is a story not of the glory of international test results, but of the hard work and tenacity of a few generations of policy makers, practitioners and teacher trainers. Despite its success, Singapore continues to reform its education system, and is willing to deal with difficult issues and challenges of change. Citing Singapore's transformation, author Pak Tee Ng highlights how context and culture affect education policy formulation and implementation. Showing how difficult education reform can be when a system needs to negotiate between competing philosophies, significant trade-offs, or paradoxical positions, this book explores the successes and struggles of the Singapore system and examines its future direction and areas of tension. The book also explores how national education systems can be strengthened by embracing the creative tensions generated by paradoxes such as the co-existence of timely change and timeless constants, centralisation and decentralisation, meritocracy and compassion, and teaching less and learning more. Learning from Singapore brings to the world the learning from Singapore—what Singapore has learned from half a century of educational change—and encourages every education system to bring hope to and secure a future for the next generation.
Your guide to acing the TExEs exam This best-selling handbook is the definitive resource for prospective principals who want to boost student performance and demonstrate outstanding school leadership. Thoroughly updated to address the completely revamped TExES exam, this new edition details: The domains and competencies of successful school leadership The leadership philosophy on which TexES is constructed A sample test and important areas to focus on What to do in the weeks, days, and even the night before the test An extensive list of additional resources to supplement each domain
This book answers a simple question: How would one redesign the American education system if the aim was to take advantage of everything that has been learned by countries with the world's best education systems?With a growing number of countries outperforming the United States on the most respected comparisons of student achievement--and spending less on education per student--this question is critical.Surpassing Shanghai looks in depth at the education systems that are leading the world in student performance to find out what strategies are working and how they might apply to the United States. Developed from the work of the National Center on Education and the Economy, which has been researching the education systems of countries with the highest student performance for more than twenty years, this book provides a series of answers to the question of how the United States can compete with the world's best.
Continuing Joel Spring’s reportage and analysis of the intersection of global forces and education, this text offers a comprehensive overview and synthesis of current research, theories, and models related to the topic. Written in his signature clear, narrative style, Spring introduces the processes, institutions, and forces by which schooling has been globalized and examines the impact of these forces on schooling in local contexts. Significant conceptual frameworks are added to this Second Edition, specifically the “economization of education,” “corporatization of education” and the “audit state.” These concepts are embedded in the global educational plans of major organizations such as the World Bank, the Organization for Economic Development and Cooperation (OECD), World Economic Forum, and multinational corporations. Globalization of Education, Second Edition features new and updated information on • The World Bank • OECD and the United Nations • The World Trade Organization and the Global Culture of Higher Education • Corporatization of Global Education • Religious and Indigenous Education Models • The Global Workforce: Migration and the Talent Auction • Globalization and Complex Thought
Following three teenagers who chose to spend one school year living in Finland, South Korea, and Poland, a literary journalist recounts how attitudes, parenting, and rigorous teaching have revolutionized these countries' education results.
This book introduces and explores the nature of large scale reform, and offers a fresh insight into the importance of social capital and professional development leadership for teachers and school management. It synthesizes research on the role of the professional development leader and the importance of social capital in schools, and examines its potential to impact large scale, system-wide, reform projects. The text presents a range of international examples and theories from renowned researchers and educationists, which illustrate the challenge of raising the prominence of education social capital in schools. Considering crucial research that informs effective adult learning interventions, underlying themes supporting constructivist and transformative interventions are identified and woven into the narrative. Factors and variables needed to encourage and implement initiatives are examined, and each section is accompanied by case studies from around the world. The book is split into five sections and twelve parts which include: -The Lesson of Large Scale Reform for Leadership Development -Assessment of Wide Scale Educational Reform Initiatives -Developing Social Capital through National Education Reform -System Improvement through Professional Learning Communities Large Scale School Reform and Social Capital Building will be of interest to policy makers and system reform leaders, along with researchers and postgraduate students with a focus on continuous professional development, educational reform and school leadership.
The secrets behind China's extraordinary educational system – good, bad, and ugly Chinese students' consistently stunning performance on the international PISA exams— where they outscore students of all other nations in math, reading, and science—have positioned China as a world education leader. American educators and pundits have declared this a "Sputnik Moment," saying that we must learn from China's education system in order to maintain our status as an education leader and global superpower. Indeed, many of the reforms taking hold in United States schools, such as a greater emphasis on standardized testing and the increasing importance of core subjects like reading and math, echo the Chinese system. We're following in China's footsteps—but is this the direction we should take? Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Dragon? by award-winning writer Yong Zhao offers an entertaining, provocative insider's account of the Chinese school system, revealing the secrets that make it both "the best and worst" in the world. Born and raised in China's Sichuan province and a teacher in China for many years, Zhao has a unique perspective on Chinese culture and education. He explains in vivid detail how China turns out the world's highest-achieving students in reading, math, and science—yet by all accounts Chinese educators, parents, and political leaders hate the system and long to send their kids to western schools. Filled with fascinating stories and compelling data, Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Dragon? offers a nuanced and sobering tour of education in China. Learn how China is able to turn out the world's highest achieving students in math, science, and reading Discover why, despite these amazing test scores, Chinese parents, teachers, and political leaders are desperate to leave behind their educational system Discover how current reforms in the U.S. parallel the classic Chinese system, and how this could help (or hurt) our students' prospects
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Since the dawn of civilization, humans have struggled to describe the defining virtues of civilization—and, in the process, have confronted some of mankind’s most difficult and enduring questions. In Truth, Beauty, and Goodness Reframed, renowned scholar Howard Gardner traces the astonishing transformations in our conceptions of these three virtues in our lifetime—and describes the newfound challenges in making sense of them. How do we distinguish truth from “truthiness” in the Age of the Internet? How do we judge beauty when modern artists treat it like an outdated virtue? And how do we distinguish right from wrong in age of relativistic and politicized morality? In this incisive and masterful book, Gardner brilliantly highlights the current state of these virtues, argues for their continued importance in human society, and explains how we should be educating for them in the twenty-first century—both in and out of the classroom.
Big cities have mostly failed in their efforts to reform public schools. This book shows why, and offers a framework for achieving future success. Fullan and Boyle, internationally renowned thinkers on school change, demonstrate that while the educational challenges of big cities can be overwhelming, they are not insurmountable. They identify six essential "push" and "pull" actions that can enable big school systems to improve student achievement. Leaders need to push to challenge the staus quo, convey a high sense of urgency, and have the courage needed to intervene. But they need to also pull together to create a commonly owned strategy, develop a profesisonal power of capital, and attend to sustainability. Examining three major cities, New York, Toronto, and London, through the decade of 2002 - 2012. this book weaves case studies with careful analysis and recommendations to hone in on which policies and strategies generate quality implementation that in turn raise the bar for all students and reduce the gap for the disadvantaged. Big-City School Reforms offers invaluable advice to those leading the next phase of school reform in cities around the world.
This superbly researched study offers a chalk-face perspective on the secret of Finland’s educational success. Providing an intimate and revealing portrait of the Nordic nation’s schools and its teacher training system, it sets out to explain why Finland’s students consistently rank top, with low variance and moderate inputs, among OECD countries across the range of criteria, from reading to mathematics. Alongside the detailed analysis culled from many hours of interviews with teachers and principals and dozens of visits to school throughout the country, the author maps the educational landscape of Finland: the sector’s history, culture and development, its guiding principles, methodologies, and learning environments. The result is a cogent assessment of how and why Finland is universally regarded as a high-grade educational exemplar. The volume provides the hundreds of researchers, teaching professionals, and policy makers who visit Finland in search of inspiration with essential background material on the country’s magic educational ingredients, which include a highly motivated cohort of well-trained teachers, a recognition of the vital importance of early years education and nurture, functional and inviting learning environments, and a rejection of pedagogical dogma in favour of developing methodologies that produce results at the same time as fostering students’ confidence and collegiality. At the same age, Finland’s schoolchildren have roughly one less year of formal schooling than most of their international counterparts, do not consider themselves to be overworked, and rank alongside hot-housed Singaporean or South Korean youngsters in international assessments of achievement. They are the educational equivalent of world-beating sports stars who make success appear effortless. This volume lifts the lid on the hard work and careful planning that underpin their achievements.
Finnish education has been a focus of global interest since its first PISA success in 2001. After years of superficial celebration, astonishment and educational tourism, the focus has recently shifted to what is possibly the most interesting element of this Finnish success story: that Finnish schools have been effectively applying methods that go against the flow of global education policy with no testing, no inspection, no hard evaluation, no detailed national curriculum, no accountability and no hard competition. From a historical and sociological perspective the Finnish case is not merely a linear success story, but is part of a controversial and paradoxical struggle towards Utopia: towards egalitarian schooling. Bringing together a collection of essays by Hannu Simola and his colleagues, this book analyses the key dimensions of schooling in Finland to provide a critical, analytical and uncompromising picture of the Finnish education system. Going beyond the story of success, the book reveals the complexities of educational change, but also identifies opportunities and alternatives for smart political action in complex and trans-national societies. Including a selection of key chapters on Finnish education policy and governance, teacher education and classroom cultures, the book will be of interest to researchers, academics and postgraduate students in comparative education, teacher education, educational policy and educational reform.
This timely collection of essays addresses the demanding but also rewarding work of supporting schools and nurturing the learning of school children today. (Education/Teaching)
Education is threatened on a global scale by forces of neoliberalism, through high stakes accountability, privatization and a destructive language of learning. In all respects, a GERM (Global Education Reform Movement) has erupted from international benchmark rankings such as PISA, TIMMS and PIRL, causing inequity, narrowing of the curriculum and teacher deprofessionalization on a truly global scale. In this book, teachers from around the world and other educational experts such as Andy Hargreaves, Ann Lieberman, Stephen Ball, Gert Biesta, Tom Bennett and many more, make the case to move away from this uneducational economic approach, to instead embrace a more humane, more democratic approach to education. This approach is called ‘flipping the system’, a move that places teachers exactly where they need to be - at the steering wheel of educational systems worldwide. This book will appeal to teachers and other education professionals around the world.

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