From beer labels to literary classics like A River Runs Through It, trout fishing is a beloved feature of the iconography of the American West. But as Jen Brown demonstrates in Trout Culture: How Fly Fishing Forever Changed the Rocky Mountain West, the popular conception of Rocky Mountain trout fishing as a quintessential experience of communion with nature belies the sport�s long history of environmental manipulation, engineering, and, ultimately, transformation. A fly-fishing enthusiast herself, Brown places the rise of recreational trout fishing in a local and global context. Globally, she shows how the European sport of fly-fishing came to be a defining, tourist-attracting feature of the expanding 19th-century American West. Locally, she traces the way that the burgeoning fly-fishing tourist industry shaped the environmental, economic, and social development of the Western United States: introducing and stocking favored fish species, eradicating the less favored native �trash fish,� changing the courses of waterways, and leading to conflicts with Native Americans� fishing and territorial rights. Through this analysis, Brown demonstrates that the majestic trout streams often considered a timeless feature of the American West are in fact the product of countless human interventions adding up to a profound manipulation of the Rocky Mountain environment. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZKMwEkKj9jg
Many of the world's fisheries are in trouble - they no longer yield the catches, and potential profits, they once did. The habitats that support fisheries have been damaged by pollution and other irresponsible use of coastal land. Destructive fishing methods like trawling and blast fishing have also changed fish habitats resulting in support of fewer fish. The authors draw on more than 1000 scientific papers covering 11 groups/species of marine invertebrates. From this large literature, they distill 20 lessons for assessing and guiding the use of restocking and stock enhancement in the management of invertebrate fisheries. • Written by 7 expert authors • Covers 11 groups/species of marine invertebrates • Reviews over 1000 scientific papers • Identifies 20 lessons that can be learned from past restocking and stock enhancement initiatives • Proposes a new approach to assess the potential value of hatchery releases to complement other forms of management • Assesses progress of disciple against the blueprint for a responsible approach
Marine researcher Aaron Adams shares his knowledge about sea grass, mangroves, salt marshes, oyster bars, shorelines, beaches, sand flats, and coral reefs from the Caribbean to the Carolinas, the Gulf of Mexico to the Florida coast, to give reader swhat they need to know to fish for tropical, subtropical, and warm-water species. Behavior, life cycles, and fishing tips for 25 marine gamefish and their prey are included. Species include red drum, spotted seatrout, permit, bonefish, snook, tarpon, barracuda, snapper, ladyfish, weakfish, bluefish, striped bass, cobia, cero mackerel, Spanish mackerel, and jacks. The updated and revised new edition contains new chapters as well as an all-new art program.
The standard reference for ichthyologists and limnologists in the Great Basin region provides comprehensive data on introduced and native fish species. New foreword by Gary Vinyard and Jim Deacon. Updated taxonomy by Craig Stockwell. See also: Fishes of the Great Basin (for lay people and professionals) and Recreational Fisheries (for professionals).
Efforts to direct the recovery of damaged sites and landscape date back as far as the 1930s. If we fully understood the conditions and controlling variables at restoration sites, we would be better equipped to predict the outcomes of restoration efforts. If there were no constraints, we could merely plant the restoration site and walk away. However, the development of restoration theory has not yet lead to predictability. The Handbook for Restoring Tidal Wetlands fills an important gap in current restoration ecology literature. It provides a broad-based compilation of case studies and principles to guide the management of tidal restoration sites. Thoroughly illustrated with more than 170 figures and tables, the book covers a full range of topics including: the conceptual planning for coastal wetlands restoration strategies for the manipulation of hydrology and soils the reestablishment of vegetation and assemblages of fishes and invertebrates the process of assessing, monitoring, and sustaining restored wetlands Combining detailed examples from coastal research studies along the Pacific coast of southern California with information drawn from the literature on coastal restoration across the globe, the Handbook for Restoring Tidal Wetlands is a must-have guide if you are involved in coastal mitigation and restoration projects.

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