Blithely flinging aside the Victorian manners that kept her disapproving mother corseted, the New Woman of the 1920s puffed cigarettes, snuck gin, hiked her hemlines, danced the Charleston, and necked in roadsters. More important, she earned her own keep, controlled her own destiny, and secured liberties that modern women take for granted. Her newfound freedom heralded a radical change in American culture. Whisking us from the Alabama country club where Zelda Sayre first caught the eye of F. Scott Fitzgerald to Muncie, Indiana, where would-be flappers begged their mothers for silk stockings, to the Manhattan speakeasies where patrons partied till daybreak, historian Joshua Zeitz brings the era to exhilarating life. This is the story of America’s first sexual revolution, its first merchants of cool, its first celebrities, and its most sparkling advertisement for the right to pursue happiness. The men and women who made the flapper were a diverse lot. There was Coco Chanel, the French orphan who redefined the feminine form and silhouette, helping to free women from the torturous corsets and crinolines that had served as tools of social control. Three thousand miles away, Lois Long, the daughter of a Connecticut clergyman, christened herself “Lipstick” and gave New Yorker readers a thrilling entrée into Manhattan’s extravagant Jazz Age nightlife. In California, where orange groves gave way to studio lots and fairytale mansions, three of America’s first celebrities—Clara Bow, Colleen Moore, and Louise Brooks, Hollywood’s great flapper triumvirate—fired the imaginations of millions of filmgoers. Dallas-born fashion artist Gordon Conway and Utah-born cartoonist John Held crafted magazine covers that captured the electricity of the social revolution sweeping the United States. Bruce Barton and Edward Bernays, pioneers of advertising and public relations, taught big business how to harness the dreams and anxieties of a newly industrial America—and a nation of consumers was born. Towering above all were Zelda and Scott Fitzgerald, whose swift ascent and spectacular fall embodied the glamour and excess of the era that would come to an abrupt end on Black Tuesday, when the stock market collapsed and rendered the age of abundance and frivolity instantly obsolete. With its heady cocktail of storytelling and big ideas, Flapper is a dazzling look at the women who launched the first truly modern decade. From the Hardcover edition.
Blithely flinging aside the Victorian manners that kept her disapproving mother corseted, the New Woman of the 1920s puffed cigarettes, snuck gin, hiked her hemlines, danced the Charleston, and necked in roadsters. More important, she earned her own keep, controlled her own destiny, and secured liberties that modern women take for granted. Her newfound freedom heralded a radical change in American culture. Whisking us from the Alabama country club where Zelda Sayre first caught the eye of F. Scott Fitzgerald to Muncie, Indiana, where would-be flappers begged their mothers for silk stockings, to the Manhattan speakeasies where patrons partied till daybreak, historian Joshua Zeitz brings the era to exhilarating life. This is the story of America’s first sexual revolution, its first merchants of cool, its first celebrities, and its most sparkling advertisement for the right to pursue happiness. The men and women who made the flapper were a diverse lot. There was Coco Chanel, the French orphan who redefined the feminine form and silhouette, helping to free women from the torturous corsets and crinolines that had served as tools of social control. Three thousand miles away, Lois Long, the daughter of a Connecticut clergyman, christened herself “Lipstick” and gave New Yorker readers a thrilling entrée into Manhattan’s extravagant Jazz Age nightlife. In California, where orange groves gave way to studio lots and fairytale mansions, three of America’s first celebrities—Clara Bow, Colleen Moore, and Louise Brooks, Hollywood’s great flapper triumvirate—fired the imaginations of millions of filmgoers. Dallas-born fashion artist Gordon Conway and Utah-born cartoonist John Held crafted magazine covers that captured the electricity of the social revolution sweeping the United States. Bruce Barton and Edward Bernays, pioneers of advertising and public relations, taught big business how to harness the dreams and anxieties of a newly industrial America—and a nation of consumers was born. Towering above all were Zelda and Scott Fitzgerald, whose swift ascent and spectacular fall embodied the glamour and excess of the era that would come to an abrupt end on Black Tuesday, when the stock market collapsed and rendered the age of abundance and frivolity instantly obsolete. With its heady cocktail of storytelling and big ideas, Flapper is a dazzling look at the women who launched the first truly modern decade. From the Hardcover edition. From Publishers Weekly This is an entertaining, well-researched and charmingly illustrated dissection of the 1920s flapper, who flouted conventions and epitomized the naughtiness of the Jazz Age as she "bobbed her hair, smoked cigarettes, drank gin, sported short skirts, and passed her evenings in steamy jazz clubs." Cambridge historian Zeitz identifies F. Scott Fitzgerald as "the premier analyst," and his muse and wife, Zelda, "the prototype" of the American flapper. Others who invented aspects of the flapper mystique were New Yorker writer Lois Long, who gave readers a vicarious peek into the humorous late-night adventures of the New Woman; designer Coco Chanel, whose androgynous fashions redefined feminine sexuality as they blurred the line between men's and women's roles in society; fashion artist Gordon Conway, whose willowy and aloof flappers were seen by millions of American and European magazine readers; and Clara Bow, who breathed life into the flapper on the silver screen. The Klan, Zeitz relates, denounced flappers as evils of the modern age, and advertisers exploited the social anxieties of would-be flappers by appealing to the conformist at the heart of this controversial figure. (Mar.) Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. From Booklist Starred Review This lively history looks at the Jazz Age through its greatest symbol, the flapper. A far cry from the staid Victorian angel of the house, flappers wore their hair short, dared to show their legs, drank, smoked, and cavorted with young men. Alhough he didn't invent the flapper as many suppose, F. Scott Fitzgerald did bring the modern woman into the public eye in his debut novel, This Side of Paradise. Zeitz explores the lives of the women who have come to personify the flapper ideal: Zelda Sayre, the southern belle who married Fitzgerald and became his muse; Lois Long, the sharp-tongued New Yorker columnist whose nightlife was often the subject of her writing; Coco Chanel, the elegant designer who carefully crafted her own backstory; and the actresses Colleen Moore, Clara Bow, and Louise Brooks, who brought the flapper to the silver screen only to be left in the dust when the following decade ushered in a less sexually confident feminine ideal. Zeitz's energetic writing does his subject justice, bringing to life the wild coed parties; the colorful, glitzy fashion; and the general energy and enthusiasm with which the decade embraced modernity. An essential exploration of the women Zeitz deems "the first thoroughly modern American[s]." Kristine Huntley Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved
This book offers an examination of the Roaring Twenties in the United States, focusing on the vibrant icon of the newly liberated woman—the flapper—that came to embody the Jazz Age. * Primary documents allow readers to see how contemporaries viewed flappers, follow the trial of a famous comedian charged with a horrific crime, and read what proponents of Prohibition really thought about wicked liquor * The glossary allows readers to enter into the spirit of the times, when people could express their delight using phrases such as "bee's knees," and "cat's meow"; pass along the word about illegal booze with colorful terms such as "hooch," "bathtub gin," and "bootleg"; and describe relentless dancers as "floorflushers," women using too much face makeup as "flour lovers," and pilots as "fly boys."
Chicago 1920: Hadley Richardson hat die Liebe und das Glück bereits aufgegeben, als sie Ernest Hemingway trifft und sofort von seinem guten Aussehen, seiner Gefühlstiefe und seiner Kunst, mit Worten zu verführen, angezogen wird. Die beiden heiraten und gehen nach Paris, wo sie Teil einer schillernden Gruppe Amerikaner werden, unter ihnen Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound und die Fitzgeralds. Doch im Paris der goldenen 20er – fiebrig, glamourös, verwegen – lassen sich Familie und Treue kaum aufrechterhalten. Während Hadley, inzwischen Mutter, mit Eifersucht und Selbstzweifeln ringt und Ernests literarische Arbeit allmählich Früchte trägt, wird das Paar mit einer Enttäuschung konfrontiert, die das Ende all dessen bedeutet, was es gemeinsam erträumt hatte...
This book is the definitive guide to the film, stage, radio and television career of Kay Francis, one of the most glamorous stars from the golden age of Hollywood. For each film, the authors provide a thorough synopsis plus cast and crew information (including biographies), opening dates, production notes, behind-the-scenes details, and reviews. In addition, information is provided on her stage, radio, and television appearances, and a section is devoted to collecting Kay Francis memorabilia, including such items as cigarette cards, sheet music and soundtracks. Also covered is the stage and vaudeville career of Kay Francis’ mother, Katherine Clinton. A brief biography of Kay Francis is provided, along with an insightful foreword by film scholar James Robert Parish. Truly a treasure trove for Kay Francis fans and anyone interested in classic filmmaking in the 1930s and 1940s, the book includes more than 130 illustrations, many of them rare.
Ein melancholischer Abgesang auf eine verlorene Welt: Kosmopolitisch, libertin, glamourös und dekadent - mit fotografischer Präzision erfasst Christopher Isherwood die letzten Tage der Weimarer Republik in Berlin und zeichnet unvergessliche Porträts der Menschen, die seinen Weg kreuzen und unterschiedlicher nicht sein könnten: zwei junge Männer, die in fataler Weise voneinander abhängen, eine vermögende jüdische Familie, die das nahende Unglück nicht wahrhaben will, und zahlreiche Mitglieder der Halbwelt, unter ihnen die hinreißend leichtsinnige Sally Bowles, die in der Literatur ihresgleichen sucht. Im Hintergrund der Szenerie marschieren bereits die Nazis auf. Isherwoods Figuren aber verschließen die Augen vor der drohenden Katastrophe und feiern sich um den Verstand.
The first A-to-Z encyclopedia devoted to the breast, providing insight into the historical magnitude and cultural significance of this body part in art, history, fashion, medicine, and more.
Die Eule aus Athen ist dem Esel auf der Brücke sein Feind! Warum lachen eigentlich die Hühner? Wie kommt der Schimmel ins Amt? Und was hat es mit dem Bärendienst auf sich? Die deutsche Sprache ist voller tierischer Begriffe und Redewendungen, deren tiefere Bedeutung sich meist erst auf den zweiten Blick zeigt. Sigi Kube schaut dem geschenkten Gaul mit Argusaugen ins Maul und weiß jetzt, wie der Hase läuft: Wer die Sau rauslässt und dann einen Kater hat, dem helfen keine Krokodilstränen – und das Kreidefressen ist auch für die Katz. Nicht nur für Leseratten und Bücherwürmer ein wunderbares sprachliches Pläsierchen. Mein lieber Schwan!
Explores many of the important social, historical and cultural contexts surrounding the life and works of F. Scott Fitzgerald.
"[An] engrossing survey of the history of childbirth."—Stephen Lowman, Washington Post Making and having babies—what it takes to get pregnant, stay pregnant, and deliver—have mystified women and men throughout human history. The insatiably curious Randi Hutter Epstein journeys through history, fads, and fables, and to the fringe of science. Here is an entertaining must-read—an enlightening celebration of human life.
1927. Ein Sommer der ein ganzes Jahrhundert prägte Es ist die Geschichte eines Sommers, und doch ist es so viel mehr. Das Jahr 1927 ist für Amerika entscheidend auf dem Weg zur Weltmacht. Es sind die goldenen Zwanziger: der Aktienmarkt boomt, das Fernsehen wird erfunden, die Filme sind nicht mehr stumm, und verrückte Pläne entstehen, wie der, vier Köpfe in den völlig unzugänglichen Mount Rushmore zu meißeln. Es ist die Zeit, in der ein junger Flieger namens Charles Lindbergh Ruhm und Ehre erlangt, aber auch die des Al Capone und des größten Schulmassakers aller Zeiten. Und in diesen Monaten werden durch fatale Entscheidungen die Weichen für die bevorstehende Weltwirtschaftskrise gestellt. Bill Bryson erzählt davon so spannend, als sei es eine unglaubliche Abenteuergeschichte, voller erstaunlicher geschichtlicher Momente aus der Zeit, als Amerika erwachsen wurde ...
Political and social commentators regularly bemoan the decline of morality in the modern world. They claim that the norms and values that held society together in the past are rapidly eroding, to be replaced by permissiveness and empty hedonism. But as Edward Rubin demonstrates in this powerful account of moral transformations, these prophets of doom are missing the point. Morality is not diminishing; instead, a new morality, centered on an ethos of human self-fulfillment, is arising to replace the old one. As Rubin explains, changes in morality have gone hand in hand with changes in the prevailing mode of governance throughout the course of Western history. During the Early Middle Ages, a moral system based on honor gradually developed. In a dangerous world where state power was declining, people relied on bonds of personal loyalty that were secured by generosity to their followers and violence against their enemies. That moral order, exemplified in the early feudal system and in sagas like The Song of Roland, The Song of the Cid, and the Arthurian legends has faded, but its remnants exist today in criminal organizations like the Mafia and in the rap music of the urban ghettos. When state power began to revive in the High Middle Ages through the efforts of the European monarchies, and Christianity became more institutionally effective and more spiritually intense, a new morality emerged. Described by Rubin as the morality of higher purposes, it demanded that people devote their personal efforts to achieving salvation and their social efforts to serving the emerging nation-states. It insisted on social hierarchy, confined women to subordinate roles, restricted sex to procreation, centered child-rearing on moral inculcation, and countenanced slavery and the marriage of pre-teenage girls to older men. Our modern era, which began in the late 18th century, has seen the gradual erosion of this morality of higher purposes and the rise of a new morality of self-fulfillment, one that encourages individuals to pursue the most meaningful and rewarding life-path. Far from being permissive or a moral abdication, it demands that people respect each other's choices, that sex be mutually enjoyable, that public positions be allocated according to merit, and that society provide all its members with their minimum needs so that they have the opportunity to fulfill themselves. Where people once served the state, the state now functions to serve the people. The clash between this ascending morality and the declining morality of higher purposes is the primary driver of contemporary political and cultural conflict. A sweeping, big-idea book in the vein of Francis Fukuyama's The End of History, Charles Taylor's The Secular Age, and Richard Sennett's The Fall of Public Man, Edward Rubin's new volume promises to reshape our understanding of morality, its relationship to government, and its role in shaping the emerging world of High Modernity.
Wenn Träume tödlich sind New York, 1927: Während Evie O’Neill durch ihre besonderen Fähigkeiten zur landesweiten Berühmtheit wurde, braut sich das Unheil zusammen: Mehr und mehr Leute fallen einer mysteriösen Schlafkrankheit zum Opfer. Die Ärzte sind ratlos. Jetzt ruht alle Hoffnung auf den Diviners, denn sie können in die Träume anderer Menschen eindringen und der Krankheit so hoffentlich auf den Grund gehen. Doch was sie dort vorfinden, übersteigt ihre schlimmsten Befürchtungen ...
Sie kennt deine dunkelsten Geheimnisse... New York, 1926: Wegen eines kleinen „Zwischenfalls“ wurde Evie O‘Neill aus ihrer langweiligen Kleinstadt ins aufregende New York verbannt. Dort genießt sie das wilde Partyleben, bis ein seltsamer Ritualmord die Stadt erschüttert – und Evie über ihren Onkel, den Direktor des Museums für Amerikanisches Volkstum, Aberglauben und Okkultes plötzlich mitten in den Mordermittlungen steckt. Schon bald weiß sie mehr als die Polizei. Denn Evie hat eine geheime Gabe, von der niemand wissen darf: Sie kann Gegenständen die intimsten Geheimnisse ihrer Besitzer entlocken. Doch sie hat keine Ahnung, mit welch entsetzlicher Bestie sie es zu tun bekommt ...
Turn-of-the-century Paris was the beating heart of a rapidly changing world. Painters, scientists, revolutionaries, poets--all were there. But so, too, were the shadows: Paris was a violent, criminal place, its sinister alleyways the haunts of Apache gangsters and its cafes the gathering places of murderous anarchists. In 1911, it fell victim to perhaps the greatest theft of all time--the taking of the Mona Lisa from the Louvre. Immediately, Alphonse Bertillon, a detective world-renowned for pioneering crime-scene investigation techniques, was called upon to solve the crime. And quickly the Paris police had a suspect: a young Spanish artist named Pablo Picasso....
Historians of postwar American politics often identify race as a driving force in the dynamically shifting political culture. Joshua Zeitz instead places religion and ethnicity at the fore, arguing that ethnic conflict among Irish Catholics, Italian Catholics, and Jews in New York City had a decisive impact on the shape of liberal politics long before black-white racial identity politics entered the political lexicon. Understanding ethnicity as an intersection of class, national origins, and religion, Zeitz demonstrates that the white ethnic populations of New York had significantly diverging views on authority and dissent, community and individuality, secularism and spirituality, and obligation and entitlement. New York Jews came from Eastern European traditions that valued dissent and encouraged political agitation; their Irish and Italian Catholic neighbors tended to value commitment to order, deference to authority, and allegiance to church and community. Zeitz argues that these distinctions ultimately helped fracture the liberal coalition of the Roosevelt era, as many Catholics bolted a Democratic Party increasingly focused on individual liberties, and many dissent-minded Jews moved on to the antiliberal New Left.
Amory Blaine ist begabt und privilegiert. Von der Mutter hat er die Überzeugung, zu Höherem geboren zu sein. Er studiert in Princeton, und nach etlichen Flirts begegnet er Rosalind, seiner ersten großen Liebe. Als sie ihn für einen anderen verläßt, zerschellen Amorys jugendliche Ideale. Was bleibt, ist der Alkohol – aber trotz aller Trauer und Enttäuschung auch die Erkenntnis, daß das Leben, so pathetisch und lächerlich es oft scheint, doch lebenswert ist: nicht jenseits, sondern diesseits vom Paradies.

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