Photocopy and make flexagon nets plus explanation of maths at recreational level.
Offers puzzles, games and problems featuring matrixes, probability, topology, card tricks, paradoxes, and logic
A flexagon is a motion structure that has the appearance of a ring of hinged polygons. It can be flexed to display different pairs of faces, usually in cyclic order. Flexagons can be appreciated as toys or puzzles, as a recreational mathematics topic, and as the subject of serious mathematical study. Workable paper models of flexagons are easy to make and entertaining to manipulate. The mathematics of flexagons is complex, and how a flexagon works is not immediately obvious on examination of a paper model. Recent geometric analysis, included in the book, has improved theoretical understanding of flexagons, especially relationships between different types. This profusely illustrated book is arranged in a logical order appropriate for a textbook on the geometry of flexagons. It is written so that it can be enjoyed at both the recreational mathematics level, and at the serious mathematics level. The only prerequisite is some knowledge of elementary geometry, including properties of polygons. A feature of the book is a compendium of over 100 nets for making paper models of some of the more interesting flexagons, chosen to complement the text. These are accurately drawn and reproduced at half full size. Many of the nets have not previously been published. Instructions for assembling and manipulating the flexagons are included.
A flexagon is a motion structure that has the appearance of a ring of hinged polygons. It can be flexed to display different pairs of faces, usually in cyclic order. Flexagons can be appreciated as toys or puzzles, as a recreational mathematics topic, and as the subject of serious mathematical study. Workable paper models of flexagons are easy to make and entertaining to manipulate. The mathematics of flexagons is complex, and how a flexagon works is not immediately obvious on examination of a paper model. Recent geometric analysis, included in the book, has improved theoretical understanding of flexagons, especially relationships between different types. This profusely illustrated book is arranged in a logical order appropriate for a textbook on the geometry of flexagons. It is written so that it can be enjoyed at both the recreational mathematics level, and at the serious mathematics level. The only prerequisite is some knowledge of elementary geometry, including properties of polygons. A feature of the book is a compendium of over 100 nets for making paper models of some of the more interesting flexagons, chosen to complement the text. These are accurately drawn and reproduced at half full size. Many of the nets have not previously been published. Instructions for assembling and manipulating the flexagons are included.
Are you ready to flip out? Hexaflexagons are six-sided, flat paper models that can be made to reveal hidden images through a series of flexes and folds. Flexagons were first introduced in a column written by Martin Gardner for Scientific American. From there, people started folding and figuring out creative ways to craft these interesting origami-like objects. Included in this delightful book are instructions and material to create hexaflexagons, tri-tetra flexagons, cubes, flexacubes, and more! Flexing kaleidocycles are shapes formed by taking several tetrahedra (four-sided 3D shapes) and joining their edges to form a ring, which can then be rotated so that it turns inside out to display a multitude different colors, shapes, and designs! This book contains: * A brief introduction on the history of hexaflexagons * Instructions on how to make 13 different fun flexagon models * 40 pages of easy tear-out pages with pieces to assemble your hexaflexagons People are still discovering new ways to innovate with these enjoyable creations--so with some study and practice, you may be able to come up with a unique design and enter the pages of flexagon history! All you need to do is to cut out and assemble the various models in this book to create the most intriguing and entertaining designs available. Start folding your flexagons now!
Flexagons are curious objects made by folding paper in special ways. Hidden inside a flexagon, and there are a number to cut out and make here, are a number of concealed faces and the challenge is to discover how to flex them into view.
All the puzzles inside are made out of paper from simple teasers to extreme brain workouts!
Explains the mathematical theory of groups and how it can be used to solve Rubik's Cube and similar puzzles
The history of mathematics is filled with major breakthroughs resulting from solutions to recreational problems. Problems of interest to gamblers led to the modern theory of probability, for example, and surreal numbers were inspired by the game of Go. Yet even with such groundbreaking findings and a wealth of popular-level books exploring puzzles and brainteasers, research in recreational mathematics has often been neglected. The Mathematics of Various Entertaining Subjects brings together authors from a variety of specialties to present fascinating problems and solutions in recreational mathematics. Contributors to the book show how sophisticated mathematics can help construct mazes that look like famous people, how the analysis of crossword puzzles has much in common with understanding epidemics, and how the theory of electrical circuits is useful in understanding the classic Towers of Hanoi puzzle. The card game SET is related to the theory of error-correcting codes, and simple tic-tac-toe takes on a new life when played on an affine plane. Inspirations for the book's wealth of problems include board games, card tricks, fake coins, flexagons, pencil puzzles, poker, and so much more. Looking at a plethora of eclectic games and puzzles, The Mathematics of Various Entertaining Subjects is sure to entertain, challenge, and inspire academic mathematicians and avid math enthusiasts alike.
Provides instructions on making a variety of books along with information on tools and materials.
The legacy of Martin Gardner is celebrated in this broad collection of articles. Essential reading for all recreational mathematicians.
Do all problems have solutions? Is complexity synonymous with difficulty? This original collection of mathematical puzzles and paradoxes proves that things aren't always what they seem! Readers will discover that nothing is as easy or as difficult as it looks and that puzzles can have one, several, or no solutions. The fun-filled puzzles begin with The Tricky Hole, a challenge that involves pushing a large coin through a small hole in a sheet of paper without ripping or making any cuts in the paper. Advance to the Elastic Playing Card, in which it's possible to cut a hole into a playing card big enough for someone to climb through. Other incredible puzzles include Elephants and Castles, Trianglized Kangaroo, Honest Dice and Logic Dice, Mind-reading Powers, and dozens more. Complete solutions explain the mathematical realities behind the fantastic-sounding challenges.
Cut and Fold Techniques for Promotional Materials is a unique collection of over 40 attention-grabbing cut-and-fold designs that when printed and illustrated form memorable give-aways to promote and advertise services and products. The book provides a one-stop source for novelty promotional materials, many appearing in print for the first time. Some designs are interactive toys that turn inside out or reveal hidden faces when played with, others are more practical, offering ingenious ways to fold-up letters, brochures, and posters, or to create novelty envelopes and leaflets. All the designs will enhance a message or presentation, grabbing attention in ways that simple printing can never achieve. Following the elegant, easy-to-follow style of Paul Jackson's other titles for Laurence King, Cut and Fold Techniques for Promotional Materials is an essential resource for marketing professionals and design students, and an inspirational guide to anyone looking to enhance the presentation of their product or service.
This easy-to-read 2010 book demonstrates how a simple geometric idea reveals fascinating connections and results in number theory, the mathematics of polyhedra, combinatorial geometry, and group theory. Using a systematic paper-folding procedure it is possible to construct a regular polygon with any number of sides. This remarkable algorithm has led to interesting proofs of certain results in number theory, has been used to answer combinatorial questions involving partitions of space, and has enabled the authors to obtain the formula for the volume of a regular tetrahedron in around three steps, using nothing more complicated than basic arithmetic and the most elementary plane geometry. All of these ideas, and more, reveal the beauty of mathematics and the interconnectedness of its various branches. Detailed instructions, including clear illustrations, enable the reader to gain hands-on experience constructing these models and to discover for themselves the patterns and relationships they unearth.
With this Alternative GCSE Guide you can survive your GCSE and get a better grade.It'll give you brilliant tips on revision and the exam as well as help you to get the best out of your coursewok and the course.And it'll let you in on the secret thoughts of the examiner...all without boring you brain-dead.
A book from the stand-up mathematician that makes math fun again! Math is boring, says the mathematician and comedian Matt Parker. Part of the problem may be the way the subject is taught, but it's also true that we all, to a greater or lesser extent, find math difficult and counterintuitive. This counterintuitiveness is actually part of the point, argues Parker: the extraordinary thing about math is that it allows us to access logic and ideas beyond what our brains can instinctively do—through its logical tools we are able to reach beyond our innate abilities and grasp more and more abstract concepts. In the absorbing and exhilarating Things to Make and Do in the Fourth Dimension, Parker sets out to convince his readers to revisit the very math that put them off the subject as fourteen-year-olds. Starting with the foundations of math familiar from school (numbers, geometry, and algebra), he reveals how it is possible to climb all the way up to the topology and to four-dimensional shapes, and from there to infinity—and slightly beyond. Both playful and sophisticated, Things to Make and Do in the Fourth Dimension is filled with captivating games and puzzles, a buffet of optional hands-on activities that entices us to take pleasure in math that is normally only available to those studying at a university level. Things to Make and Do in the Fourth Dimension invites us to re-learn much of what we missed in school and, this time, to be utterly enthralled by it.
When Janie Starks returns home, the small Black community buzzes with gossip about the outcome of her affair with a younger man
Offers instructions on folding, gluing, and sewing handmade books in a variety of shapes and styles.

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