For the Love of My Mother is the tragic and uplifting story of one Irish mother and her son. Born into a life of poverty and detained at the tender age of two for begging in the streets, Bridget Rodgers proceeded to spend the next 30 years of her life locked away in one institution or another. The orphanage came first but after being raped and falling pregnant, she was sent to a home for unmarried mothers where she gave birth, had her son taken away from her and then was sent to one of the infamous Magdalen Laundries. And that really is only the beginning of the story. A truly gripping tale told by the son she thought she'd lost for ever, it is a story of triumphing over poverty, a tale of hope when there seems to be none, and a tribute to a mother's love for her son.
This is the tragic and uplifting story of one Irish mother and her son. Born into poverty and detained at the age of two for begging in the streets, Bridget Rodgers to spent the next 30 years of her life locked away in one institution or another. After being raped and falling pregnant, she was sent to a home for unmarried mothers.
This is the tragic and uplifting story of one Irish mother and her son. Born into poverty and detained at the age of two for begging in the streets, Bridie Rodgers to spent the next 30 years of her life locked away in one institution or another. After being raped and falling pregnant, she was sent to a home for unmarried mothers.
In our world, I am just one person To a child, you are their world Lifes demands, rob precious moments This can be neither repeated nor recovered All the money and gold that one desires Cannot buy the love and pleasures lost through time It will not matter in years to come, what materials you have acquired The time you spent with a child is what will make a difference in the world It is what a child will remember.
After not seeing each other for forty years, Miranda and Adam unexpectedly reunite in Rome--where they were once in love--and take walks together, bringing each other up to date and reviewing the betrayal that drove them apart.
This is the story of an ordinary woman whose grief - and love - for her only son compelled her to do something extraordinary. When Margaret Davis's beloved son Steven was murdered by his own wife, a Philippino former prostitute, she travelled across continents to track down her son's killers and bring them to justice, and to rescue her grandchildren. Based on Margaret's own diaries, notes and emails, this tells not only the awful but utterly compelling story of her perilous journey, but also of how she has dealt with her crippling grief, and how she has striven to save and protect two small children caught up in the violent crossfire of their parents' failing marriage. It is a tale of two cultures that clashed, with terrible results. And it is a tale of how one mother, faced with her worst nightmare, has fought for justice for her son and some kind of healing for herself and the others left behind after his appalling death.
As her son grows up from little boy to adult man, a mother secretly rocks him each night as he sleeps.
A tribute to mothers everywhere. This lovely book honors all a mother has done-and continues to do- for her family, while expressing the deep gratitude that is felt for a mother. Most of all, it's a beautiful reminder of the important role mothers play in the lives of their children.
What if you could, with a little effort, finally find a path to self-love that suits you specifically? A path that will no longer lead you back to exes? A path that will no longer allow you to feel "stuck" in the same kind of poisonous relationships and situationships as everyone else around you? A path to finding out what it truly means to love YOUR self in such a way that it superchargers the love you give to others? We hear it and read about it all the time: "Love Yourself First." But HOW is the question that we all ask ourselves. Horacio Jones has expanded on the ideas that love comes in over 7 billion forms; we all learn and experience love in our own languages, and therefore our paths to healing and accepting ourselves are in different languages as well. There is no one-size-fits-all definition of love. Love is neither right or wrong, it just "is." And the purpose of this book is to shed light on the importance of living by not only your own love language, but also your own healing language. In "I Am The Love Of My Life," Horacio Jones provide you with the enlightenment on finding YOUR own unique path to love YOUR own self. A must-read for anyone whose ever had one of those "why is it so hard to love myself"" moments of self doubt.. This book will give you both new perspectives on self-appreciation principles as well as tactical thinking for figuring out what your own unique version of self-love looks like and how you can get there. Horacio Jones does an amazing job at speaking the truth in regards to relationships, situationships and love. This is a must read especially in today's society of "I don't want a relationship, but I don't want you to be single," and the very confusing "we are exclusive, but not officially together" type of dating. Welcome to the SECOND book written by Horacio Jones.
Ruth Graham, the youngest daughter of Billy and Ruth Bell Graham, shares sentimental insights, stories, and lessons learned from her mother, and shows readers how to leave a legacy of love.
The love of a mother is like no other. This is a fact based story based on the love of a young teenage mother and the bond between mother and son. As a young teenage mother many believe the woman is set up to fail but it has been proven that is not always the case. With hardwork and determination a young mother can succeed in life with her children by her side!
An illustrated biography of the sitar maestro by his daughter Anoushka, with intimate and seldom-seen photographs from family albums, personal letters, and anecdotal captions in a story told straight the heart. Uninhibited forceful and forthright.
In her acclaimed New York Times bestseller, Motherless Daughters, Hope Edelman explored the profound and lasting effects of mother loss, as well as her own search for healing. Now, in her compelling new work, Edelman explores another complex, life-changing relationship, the intricate bond between generations. Drawing from her own experience and the recollections of over seventy other granddaughters, Edelman explores the three-generation triangle from which women develop their female identities: the grandmother-mother-daughter relationship. With eloquent personal testimony, she demonstrates the vital roles grandmothers have played in their granddaughters' lives, as a source of unconditional love, family values and traditions, and backup parent, the ultimate safety net. Here are grandmothers in all their glory: The "Benevolent Manipulator", whose love for her family is matched only by her desire for control; The "Gentle Giant", awesome, respected, who possesses a quiet, behind-the-scenes power; The "Autocrat", who rules her extended family like a despot; The "Kinkeeper", the family hub, who offers a sense of cohesion to the extended clan. With insight and compassion, Edelman probes this unique and emotionally-charged relationship in a book that is a true celebration of an extraordinary bond--and a must read for every woman. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Marci and her adorable Children of the Inner Light(r) characters honor and celebrate the amazing place a mother holds in the lives of her children with this delightful book. Filled with all the words mothers would most like to hear, it captures the admiration you feel for her, the appreciation you have for all that she's given and done, the happiness she's inspired, and the memories she's helped make. This is a gift of love that every mother will treasure.
Within this book is a collection of my mothers poems written for her lost loves, her love of her country, living in a new country, her love for her children, her grandchildren, great grandchildren and all who came into her world. Before she died, she gave me some of her poetry, written in books but mostly scribbled on scraps of paper, old envelopes and clothing labels. She wrote the words as they occurred on whatever she could quickly find so as not to forget the words and inspiration. This book is a journey of the heart, captured in poetry. It is real life in words, touching the deep recesses of the heart. It helps to bridge our humanity and spirituality within an encompassing message of love. My mother was born in Scotland on 17th March, 1925 and passed away in Tasmania on 19th July, 2004. I miss her every day, I miss her support, her wit and humour, her knowledge and wisdom, but most of all her unconditional love. Sometimes when my daughters and I are gathered together, we will smell the unmistakable smell of April Violets, which was my mothers favourite perfume. We know instantly that Mum has come to join in the family time together with us. Sometimes there will be a message given and sometimes she comes to share the love. I look forward to spending time with her embodied once more in another life and time.
All of these eight wonderful stories are about what people will do for love, and the unexpected routes their passion will force them to take. An old landlady in Vancouver who alarms the just-married narrator with her prim advice about married life – and “the peculiar threat” of a china cabinet that must be washed once a month – is shown to have conspired when young in a crime of passion. A young mother, at the mercy of the “radiant explosion” that comes when she thinks of her secret life, abandons her baby and four-year old to be with her lover in the story “The Children Stay.” A gruff old country doctor in the 1960s is discovered by his daughter to be helping desperate women, his “special patients.” An impetuous young woman meets a visiting Indian student and conceives on a train from Vancouver to Toronto because of “the fact that you couldn’t get condoms around the Calgary station, not for love or money.” An Ontario farm wife’s affair drives her husband to commit a murder; its discovery, years later, will act as a negotiating point for a new, presumably satisfactory, marriage. The book is clear-eyed about the imperfections of marriage, the clutter of our emotional lives, and the impermanence of love: “Not that that was the end. For we did make up. But we didn’t forgive each other.” Even the shared memories of earlier times prove to be a minefield, and many of the stories track the changes that time brings over generations to families, lovers, and even to friends who share old, intimate secrets about “the prostration of love.” As always these stories by Alice Munro are shot through with humour, and are as rich as novels. As always the characters in the stories are easily, sometimes uncomfortably, recognizable as people like us. One quote summarizes the delightful surprises that await the reader: “Did you ever think that people’s lives could be like that and end up like this? Well, they can.” From the Hardcover edition.
After not seeing each other for forty years, Miranda and Adam unexpectedly reunite in Rome--where they were once in love--and take walks together, bringing each other up to date and reviewing the betrayal that drove them apart.
When Nancy Friday began her research for My Mother/My Self in the early 1970’s no work existed that explored the unique interaction between mother and daughter. Today psychotherapists throughout the world acknowledge that if women are to be able to love without possessing, to find work that fulfills them, and to discover their full sexuality, they must first acknowledge their identity as separate from their mother’s. Nancy Friday’s book played a major role in that acceptance. The greatest gift a good mother can give remains unquestioning love planted deep in the first year of life, so deep and anassailable that the tiny child grown to womanhood is never held back by the fear of losing that love, no matter what her own choice in love, sexuality, or work may be. Through candid self-disclosure and hundreds of interviews, Friday investigates a generational legacy and reveals the conflicting feelings of anger, hate, and love the daughter’s hold for their mothers–and why they so often “become” that mother themselves. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Since she's been ill, Lalla Fatma has become a frail little thing with a faltering memory. Lalla Fatma thinks she's in Fez in 1944, where she grew up, not in Tangier in 2000, where this story begins. She calls out to family members who are long dead and loses herself in the streets of her childhood, yearning for her first love and the city she left behind. By her bedside, her son Tahar listens to long-hidden secrets and stories from her past: married while still playing with dolls and widowed for the first time at the age of sixteen. Guided by these fragments, Tahar vividly conjures his mother's life in post-war Morocco, unravelling the story of a woman for whom resignation was the only way out. Tender and compelling, About My Mother maps the beautiful, fragile and complex nature of human experience, while paying tribute to a remarkable woman and the bond between mother and son. 'Ben Jelloun is arguably Morocco's greatest living author, whose impressive body of work combines intellect and imagination in magical fusion' Guardian 'In any language, in any culture, Tahar Ben Jelloun would be a remarkable novelist' Sunday Telegraph 'One of Morocco's most celebrated and translated writers' Asymptote 'A traditional storyteller whose tales have the status of myth ... An important writer.' Times Literary Supplement

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