Tells the story of Chinese immigrants to the United States, discussing how these individuals illegally enter the country and the poor working conditions they face in their new home
Österreich hat – wie viele europäische Länder– eine lange Tradition der Zuwanderung. Die Migrationsbewegungen haben in den letzten Jahrzehnten mit fortschreitender Globalisierung stark an Dynamik gewonnen. Die Integration von MigrantInnen wurde damit zu einem zentralen gesamtgesellschaftlichen Handlungsfeld. Migration durchdringt alle Gesellschaftsbereiche und macht soziale, wirtschaftliche und politische Umbrüche sichtbar. ‚Migration und Globalisierung in Zeiten des Umbruchs‘ spannt einen Bogen von zentralen konzeptionellen Überlegungen der aktuellen Migrations- und Integrationsforschung, über internationale ökonomische und politische Perspektiven auf globale Migrationsbewegungen und die Auswirkungen der Fluchtmigration hin zu spezifischen Aspekten von Migration und Integration in Österreich (Arbeitsmarkt, Bildung, soziale Ungleichheit) und inter- und transdisziplinären Perspektiven. Damit gibt der Sammelband einen umfassenden Einblick in den aktuellen Stand der internationalen und nationalen Migrations- und Integrationsforschung. Gudrun Biffl ist eine Pionierin in der wissenschaftlichen Auseinandersetzung und Etablierung der Migrationsforschung in Österreich. Ihr ist diese Festschrift gewidmet.
Presents an illustrated A-Z reference containing more than 300 entries related to immigration to North America, including people, places, legislation, and more.
Asian Americans adopts the unique approach of examining the issues, and often obstacles, specific to Asian immigrants into the United States, such as occupational and economic adjustment, intermarriage and settlement patterns. The Second Edition has been updated to include information derived from the 2000 US Census.
With overview essays and more than 400 A-Z entries, this exhaustive encyclopedia documents the history of Asians in America from earliest contact to the present day. Organized topically by group, with an in-depth overview essay on each group, the encyclopedia examines the myriad ethnic groups and histories that make up the Asian American population in the United States. "Asian American History and Culture" covers the political, social, and cultural history of immigrants from East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, the Pacific Islands, and their descendants, as well as the social and cultural issues faced by Asian American communities, families, and individuals in contemporary society. In addition to entries on various groups and cultures, the encyclopedia also includes articles on general topics such as parenting and child rearing, assimilation and acculturation, business, education, and literature. More than 100 images round out the set.
Offering a rich and insightful road map of Asian American history as it has evolved over more than 200 years, this book marks the first systematic attempt to take stock of this field of study. It examines, comments, and questions the changing assumptions and contexts underlying the experiences and contributions of an incredibly diverse population of Americans. Arriving and settling in this nation as early as the 1790s, with American-born generations stretching back more than a century, Asian Americans have become an integral part of the American experience; this cleverly organized book marks the trajectory of that journey, offering researchers invaluable information and interpretation. Part 1 offers a synoptic narrative history, a chronology, and a set of periodizations that reflect different ways of constructing the Asian American past. Part 2 presents lucid discussions of historical debates—such as interpreting the anti-Chinese movement of the late 1800s and the underlying causes of Japanese American internment during World War II—and such emerging themes as transnationalism and women and gender issues. Part 3 contains a historiographical essay and a wide-ranging compilation of book, film, and electronic resources for further study of core themes and groups, including Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Hmong, Indian, Korean, Vietnamese, and others.
Publisher description: In Other immigrants, David M. Reimers offers the first comprehensive account of non-European immigration, chronicling the compelling and diverse stories of frequently overlooked Americans. Reimers traces the early history of Black, Hispanic, and Asian immigrants from the fifteenth century through World War II, when racial hostility led to the virtual exclusion of Asians and aggression towards Blacks and Hispanics. He also describes the modern state of immigration to the U.S., where Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians made up nearly thirty percent of the population at the turn of the twenty-first century.
Seeking to re-imagine the meaning and significance of the international border, Opening the Floodgates makes a case for eliminating the border as a legal construct that impedes the movement of people into this country. Open migration policies deserve fuller analysis, as evidenced by President Barack Obama’s pledge to make immigration reform a priority. Kevin R. Johnson offers an alternative vision of how U.S. borders might be reconfigured, grounded in moral, economic, and policy arguments for open borders. Importantly, liberalizing migration through an open borders policy would recognize that the enforcement of closed borders cannot stifle the strong, perhaps irresistible, economic, social, and political pressures that fuel international migration. Controversially, Johnson suggests that open borders are entirely consistent with efforts to prevent terrorism that have dominated immigration enforcement since the events of September 11, 2001. More liberal migration, he suggests, would allow for full attention to be paid to the true dangers to public safety and national security.
This absorbing anthology features in-depth portraits of diverse ethnic populations, revealing the surprising new realities of immigrant life in twenty-first-century New York City. Contributors show how nearly fifty years of massive inflows have transformed New York City's economic and cultural life and how the city has changed the lives of immigrant newcomers. Nancy Foner's introduction describes New York's role as a special gateway to America. Subsequent essays focus on the Chinese, Dominicans, Jamaicans, Koreans, Liberians, Mexicans, and Jews from the former Soviet Union now present in the city and fueling its population growth. They discuss both the large numbers of undocumented Mexicans living in legal limbo and the new, flourishing community organizations offering them opportunities for advancement. They recount the experiences of Liberians fleeing a war torn country and their creation of a vibrant neighborhood on Staten Island's North Shore. Through engaging, empathetic portraits, contributors consider changing Korean-owned businesses and Chinese Americans' increased representation in New York City politics, among other achievements and social and cultural challenges. A concluding chapter follows the prospects of the U.S.-born children of immigrants as they make their way in New York City.
For every dollar owned by the average white family in the United States, the average family of color has less than a dime. Why do people of color have so little wealth? The Color of Wealth lays bare a dirty secret: for centuries, people of color have been barred by laws and by discrimination from participating in government wealth-building programs that benefit white Americans. This accessible book—published in conjunction with one of the country’s leading economics education organizations—makes the case that until government policy tackles disparities in wealth, not just income, the United States will never have racial or economic justice. Written by five leading experts on the racial wealth divide who recount the asset-building histories of Native Americans, Latinos, African Americans, Asian Americans, and European Americans, this book is a uniquely comprehensive multicultural history of American wealth. With its focus on public policies—how, for example, many post–World War II GI Bill programs helped whites only—The Color of Wealth is the first book to demonstrate the decisive influence of government on Americans’ net worth.
How do theatre and performance transmit and dispute ideologies of neoliberalism? The essays in this anthology examine the mechanisms and rhetorics of contemporary multinational and transnational organizations, artists, and communities that produce theatre and performance for global audiences.
Originally published in 2000, this fully revised and redesigned edition traces the Chinese experience in the United States from the 1780s to the present, demonstrating that Chinese Americans have played an active role in shaping the history of our nation. This revised edition includes new material on children's history, transnationalism, and health care, and the author has expanded his original text and included more Chinese American voices.
In the year 2000 the AFL-CIO announced a historic change in its position on immigration. Reversing a decades-old stance by labor, the federation declared that it would no longer press to reduce high immigration levels or call for rigorous enforcement of immigration laws. Instead, it now supports the repeal of sanctions imposed against employers who hire illegal immigrants as well as a general amnesty for most such workers. In this timely book, Vernon M. Briggs, Jr., challenges labor's recent about-face, charting the disastrous effects that immigration has had on union membership over the course of U.S. history.Briggs explores the close relationship between immigration and employment trends beginning in the 1780s. Combining the history of labor and of immigration in a new and innovative way, he establishes that over time unionism has thrived when the numbers of newcomers have decreased, and faltered when those figures have risen.Briggs argues convincingly that the labor movement cannot berevived unless the following steps are taken: immigration levels are reduced, admission categories changed, labor law reformed, and the enforcem
This groundbreaking book exposes the hidden world of Chinese irregular migrants in France, Italy, and the UK. Chinese workers migrating to Europe pay huge sums of money to intermediaries, often leaving them trapped in debt before they even begin their journey. Exposed to various risks during their migratory process, they can arrive in the destination country vulnerable to extreme exploitation and sometimes even forced labor. The book seeks to understand the links that connect vulnerable Chinese workers to European labor markets and a complex international production chain. Presenting detailed case studies, a clear explanation of the relevant international and national legal frameworks, and an overview of the migration mechanism between China and Europe, this book makes an important contribution to understanding how to break these patterns of labor exploitation.

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