Forensic Criminology gives students of criminology and criminal justice an introduction to the forensic realm and the applied forensic issues they will face when working cases within the justice system. It effectively bridges the theoretical world of social criminology with the applied world of the criminal justice system. While most of the competing textbooks on criminology adequately address the application and the social theory to the criminal justice system, the vast majority do not include casework or real-world issues that criminologists face. This book focuses on navigating casework in forensic contexts by case-working criminologists, rather than broad social theory. It also allows criminology/criminal justice instructors outside of the forensic sciences the ability to develop and instruct a core course that might otherwise be considered beyond their expertise, or in conflict with forensic courses taught in chemistry, biology, or medical programs at their institutions because of its focus on criminology and criminal justice careers. With its practical approach, this textbook is well-suited for forensic criminology subjects being taught and developed in law, criminology, and criminal justice programs around the world. Approaches the study of criminology from an applied standpoint, moving away from the purely theoretical Contains relevant and contemporary case examples to demonstrate the application of forensic criminology Provides an integrated philosophy with respect to criminology, forensic casework, criminal investigations, and the law Useful for students and professionals in the area of criminology, criminal justice, criminal investigation, forensic science, and the law
This text provides an examination of the aetiological development of forensic criminology in the UK. It links the subjects of scientific criminology, criminal investigations, crime scene investigation, forensic science and the legal system and it provides an introduction to the important processes that take place between the crime scene and the courtroom. These processes help identify, define and label the ‘criminal’ and are crucial for understanding any form of crime within society. The book includes sections on: • the epistemological and ontological philosophies of the natural sciences; • the birth of scientific criminology and its search for the criminal ‘body’; • the development of early forms of forensic science and crime scene investigation; • investigating crime; • information, material and evidence; • crime analysis and crime mapping; • scientific support and crime scene examination; and • forensic science and detection methods and forensics in the courtroom. The text combines coverage of historical research and contemporary criminal justice processes and provides an introduction to the most common forensic practices, procedures and uses that enable the identification and successful prosecution of criminals. Forensic Criminology is essential for students of criminology, criminal justice, criminal investigations and crime science. It is also useful to those criminal justice practitioners wishing to gain a more in-depth understanding of the links between criminology, criminal investigations and forensics techniques.
This book aims to show the importance of Criminology, which is an area of knowledge that is guided by its multidisciplinary nature, and that wants to analyze and study the criminal phenomenon, by crossing different areas of knowledge and practice through perspectives and methodologies, including social sciences, legal sciences and biomedical sciences, having as main grounds the law, sociology, psychology and medicine. It shows the identity of Criminology, which as a science, should be treated with the respect and seriousness that reliable sciences deserve. Underlining the fact that should be exercise by duly accredited professionals in the area, not only by lay people who have, just training through work experience, not underestimating the importance that this experience may have.
Despite a shared focus on crime and its ‘extended family’, forensic scientists and criminologists tend to work in isolation rather than sharing the data, methods and knowledge that will broaden the understanding of the criminal phenomenon and its related subjects. Bringing together perspectives from international experts, this book explores the intersection between criminology and forensic science and considers how knowledge from both fields can contribute to a better understanding of crime and offer new directions in theory and methodology. This handbook is divided into three parts: Part I explores the epistemological and historical components of criminology and forensic science, focusing on their scientific and social origins. Part II considers how collaboration between these disciplines can bring about a better understanding of the organizations and institutions that react to crime, including the court, intelligence, prevention, crime scene investigation and policing. Part III discusses the phenomena and actors that produce crime, including a reflection on the methodological issues, challenges and rewards regarding the sharing of these two disciplines. The objective of this handbook is to stimulate a ‘new’ interdisciplinary take on the study of crime, to show how both forensic and criminological theories and knowledge can be combined to analyse crime problems and to open new methodological perspectives. It will be essential reading for students and researchers engaged with forensic science, criminology, criminal behaviour, criminal investigation, crime analysis and criminal justice.
Tell kids not to worry. sorting my life out. be in touch to get some things. Instead of being a simple sms message, this text turned out to be crucial and chilling evidence in convicting the deceptive killer of a mother of two. Sent from her phone, after her death, tell tale signs announce themselves to a forensic linguist. Rarely is a crime committed without there being some evidence in the form of language. Wordcrime features a series of chapters where gripping cases are described - involving murder, sexual assault, hate mail, suspicious death, code deciphering, arson and even genocide. Olsson describes the evidence he gave in each one. In approachable and clear prose, he details how forensic linguistics helps the law beat the criminals. This is fascinating reading for anyone interested in true crime, in modern, cutting-edge criminology and also where the study of language meets the law.
The Criminalistics Laboratory Manual: The Basics of Forensic Investigation provides students with little to no prior knowledge of forensic science with a practical crime scene processing experience. The manual starts with an original crime scene narrative setting up the crime students are to solve. This narrative is picked up in each of the forensic science lab activities, tying each forensic discipline together to show the integrated workings of a real crime lab. After the completion of all of the exercises, the student will be able to solve the homicide based on forensic evidence.
The use of DNA profiling in forensic cases has been considered the most innovative technique in forensic science since fingerprinting, yet for those with limited scientific knowledge, understanding DNA enough to utilize it properly can be a daunting task. Introduction to Forensic DNA Evidence for Criminal Justice Professionals is designed for nonscientific readers who need to learn how to effectively use forensic DNA in criminal cases. Written by a forensic scientist world renowned for her expertise in clothing examination, the book provides a balanced perspective on the weight of DNA evidence. Going beyond a simple explanation of the methodology, it arms attorneys and other criminal justice professionals with knowledge of the strengths and limitations of the evidence, including the danger in relying on DNA statistical probabilities in the determination of guilt. The book covers the most common DNA methods used in criminal trials today—nuclear DNA short tandem repeat (STR) techniques, mitochondrial DNA, and Y-STR profiling. It helps prosecutors know when to emphasize DNA evidence or proceed with trial in the absence of such evidence. It assists defense lawyers in knowing when to challenge DNA evidence and perhaps employ an independent expert, when to focus elsewhere, or when to secure the advantage of an early guilty plea. By imparting practical and theoretical knowledge in an accessible manner, the book demystifies the topic to help both sides of the adversarial system understand where DNA evidence fits within the context of the case.
Criminological and Forensic Psychology is a brand-new theoretically rigorous, practically relevant, engaging and fun introduction to this broad and fascinating field. It covers both the conceptual basis within which psychology knowledge is applied in forensic contexts and the practical applications of psychology to the criminal civil justice systems. Key Features: Case studies, which include the James Bulger investigation in Chapter 5, are woven into every chapter to bring the topic to life and encourage the application of knowledge by placing you in the full context of a criminal case, showing you how psychological theories can be used to explain real-life crimes. In-depth exploration of the fascinating courtroom process including separate chapters on The Defendant's Mind and The Jury. A dedicated chapter on research methods specific to forensic psychology to help you do your research project around this topic. A Companion Website available at www.sagepub.co.uk/gavinCFP is provided to support learning and includes chapter-by-chapter multiple choice questions to test understanding of the topic, additional case studies to reinforce learning, and links to further readings to continue your exploration of the subject.
Facts101 is your complete guide to Forensic Criminology. In this book, you will learn topics such as Cognitive Ethos of the Forensic Examiner, Forensic Criminological Assessments, Criminal Profiling, and Forensic Victimology plus much more. With key features such as key terms, people and places, Facts101 gives you all the information you need to prepare for your next exam. Our practice tests are specific to the textbook and we have designed tools to make the most of your limited study time.
This important original work recognises the close relationship between criminology and forensic psychology. It offers evidence-based psychological research, relevant to the current legal justice systems operating in Australia and New Zealand.
Introduction to Forensic Criminal Psychology 6th edition provides a clear, comprehensive and engaging coverage of the subject. With a continued emphasis on key empirical findings and the theory stemming from this research, this book will equip you with a deep and contextualised understanding of this fascinating area. A range of pedagogical features will help you to quickly grasp the key concepts, appreciate the controversies and develop a practical understanding of the wide ranging topics encompassed by this ever evolving subject. Key features Market leading text in this popular area Fully up-to-date with wide-ranging classic and contemporary research. Includes coverage of radically new ideas about forensic memory, delinquency, burglary, sex offender treatment, and more. Strong emphasis on theory and key empirical findings to encourage deeper understanding Important and relevant research studies from a UK and international perspective are explored in depth. ‘Key concepts’, ‘Forensic psychology in action’ and ‘Controversies’ provide students with a broader understanding of the subject A glossary of key terms provides explanations for easy reference Further reading suggestions at the end of each chapter help students to go beyond the text and discover key resources
An accessible guide for students across a variety of disciplines who are studying forensic evidence throughout the criminal justice system. Containing up to date and classic case studies, photos and examples, it assumes no prior scientific knowledge to ensure the discussion is clear but comprehensive.
Practicing Forensic Criminology draws on examples from actual court cases and expert witness reports and testimony to demonstrate the merits and uses of substantive criminological knowledge in the applied setting of civil law and the courts. Throughout the book, the authors provide a highly readable, informative discussion of how forensic criminologists can apply their research and teaching skills to assist judges and juries in rendering legal decisions. Engaging and lively, the chapters include excerpts from forensic criminological investigations, in-depth discussions of the methodological and analytical bases of these investigations, and important lessons learned from real litigation cases. Case examples are drawn from the forensic realms of premises liability, administrative negligence, workplace violence, wrongful conviction litigation, and litigation involving police departments and corrections facilities. Well referenced and thoroughly researched, Practicing Forensic Criminology serves as an introduction to the vast and heterogeneous field of forensic social science that is rapidly changing and expanding. This unique and original book guides readers through the research work of expert witnesses working as consultants, researchers, and crime analysts and investigators. Offering expert criminological insights into litigation cases, the chapters reveal how forensic social science research can be an effective mechanism for reaching beyond the academy to influence public policy reform and legal proceedings. Practicing Forensic Criminology will appeal to a diverse audience, including social scientists, criminal justice students and researchers, expert witnesses, attorneys, judges, and students of judicial proceedings seeking to understand the value and impact of criminology in the civil court system. Introduces readers to the impact of evidence-based criminological theory and forensic social science investigations in the legal system Demonstrates the usefulness of forensic criminology as a research tool, revealing novel relational dynamics among crime events and the larger socio-spatial context Advances the development of a "translational criminology" - i.e., the translation of knowledge from criminological theory and research to forensic practice - as an expedient to forming robust interactive relationships among criminological social scientists and policy makers
Forensic psychology has developed and extended from an original, narrow focus on presenting evidence to the courts to a wider application across the whole span of civil and criminal justice, which includes dealing with suspects, offenders, victims, witnesses, defendants, litigants and justice professionals. This Handbook provides an encyclopedic-style source regarding the major concerns in forensic psychology. It is an invaluable reference text for practitioners within community, special hospital, secure unit, prison, probation and law enforcement forensic settings, as well as being appropriate for trainees and students in these areas. It will also serve as a companion text for lawyers and psychiatric and law enforcement professionals who wish to be apprised of forensic psychology coverage. Each entry provides a succinct outline of the topic, describes current thinking, identifies relevant consensual or contested aspects and alternative positions. Readers are presented with key issues and directed towards specialized sources for further reference.
Published in 2009, the first edition of Forensic Victimology introduced criminologists and criminal investigators to the idea of systematically gathering and examining victim information for the purposes of addressing investigative and forensic issues. The concepts presented within immediately proved vital to social scientists researching victims-offender relationships; investigators and forensic scientists seeking to reconstruct events and establish the elements of a crime; and criminal profilers seeking to link pattern crimes. This is because the principles and guidelines in Forensic Victimology were written to serve criminal investigation and anticipate courtroom testimony. As with the first, this second edition of Forensic Victimology is an applied presentation of a traditionally theoretical subject written by criminal justice practitioners with years of experience-both in the field and in the classroom. It distinguishes the investigative and forensic aspects of applied victim study as necessary adjuncts to what has often been considered a theoretical field. It then identifies the benefits of forensic victimology to casework, providing clearly defined methods and those standards of practice necessary for effectively serving the criminal justice system. 30% new content, with new chapters on Emergency Services, False Confessions, and Human Trafficking Use of up-to-date references and case examples to demonstrate the application of forensic victimology Provides context and scope for both the investigative and forensic aspects of case examination and evidence interpretation Approaches the study of victimology from a realistic standpoint, moving away from stereotypes and archetypes Useful for students and professionals working in relation to behavioral science, criminology, criminal justice, forensic science, and criminal investigation
Neurocriminology: Forensic and Legal Applications, Public Policy Implications explores the dramatic impact of advances in neuroscience research and practice to our present understanding of criminality and crime control. Contemporary, cutting-edge research in neuroscience is cited and explained. Studies and cases are clearly and concisely outlined with potential uses for practical applications detailed. This will be framed in the context of criminological foundations, theory, and the notion of the nature of crime itself. This comprehensive and engaging book also delves into recent developments in modern neurology, and connections between neuroscience and its criminal, legal, and forensic implications and ramifications. The book poses various questions about what insight neurology can provide to human cognition, to motivation and—in particular—criminal motivation. From biological observations is there a pattern, or are there similarities, in what the brainscan of a criminal looks like? What are the treatment implications and are their valid assessments or treatments that can be used in a corrections environment to curb, or even modify, behavior definitively? And, ultimately, what are the moral, legal and social implications of all? Coverage throughout incorporates leading research that links neurological and biological factors to heightened risk for criminality. This includes coverage of suboptimal arousal (low heart rate), testosterone, neurotransmitters, and variations in MAOA—the so-called "warrior gene"—and more. Neurocriminology will offer a thought-provoking analysis of the broad-reaching implications of this science to better inform the prevention, investigation, monitoring, and control of crime. This includes the remarkable potential for neuroscience to serve as a resource and potential tool to criminology and penology researchers, psychologists, forensic psychologists, forensic scientists, legal professionals, and investigators of crime and criminal behavior.
CSI: 1930s. Luke S. May (1892-1965) was one of the earliest consulting scientific detectives, specializing in forensic investigations. He was integral in the development of techniques, instruments, and facilities for scientific criminology. In Crime's Nemesis, May recounts the methods solving a variety of crimes, including murder and forgery. True crime fans will find these precursors to modern criminology a fascinating window to the development of crime-solving.
This book explores the ways in which criminological methods can be imaginatively deployed and developed in a world increasingly characterized by the blurred nature of social reality. Whilst recognizing the importance of positivist approaches and research techniques, it advocates a commitment to understanding the ways in which those techniques can be used imaginatively, at times in combination with less conventional methods, discussing the questions concerning risk, ethics and access that arise as a result. Giving voice to cutting edge research practices both in terms of concepts and methods that shift the criminological focus towards the kind of imaginative work that comprised the foundations of the discipline, it calls into question the utility and credentials of mainstream work that fails to serve the discipline itself or the policy questions allied to it. A call not to 'give up on numbers' but also not to be defined by statistics and the methods that produce them, Liquid Criminology sheds light on a way of doing research for criminology that is not only creative but also critical. As such, it will appeal to scholars of sociology, criminology and social policy with interests in research methods and design.
Criminal Justice: An Introduction is a complete introductory text for the most basic and widely-studied course in this subject area. Each chapter begins with behavioral objectives and a list of key terms. A variety of strategies are designed into the text to hold the attention of reader: key terms in bold lettering, side margin notes (containing interesting facts and challenging questions), boxed justice events and international perspectives, and over 80 photographs, tables and figures. Each chapter ends with applications that enable the student to apply the material to real life situations. This text competes with larger books by offering a complete but succinct and less expensive introduction to criminal justice, which will be more manageable for community colleges and colleges with shorter terms. The instructor's manual will assist educators with special projects and test questions and answers. The accompanying disk challenges students with interactive exercises. An excellent entry-level textbook for undergraduate criminal justice students. Written by an instructor of criminal justice and security for over 20 years. Includes an instructor's manual and a disk with interactive exercises for students.
Traditionally, forensic investigation has not been fully utilized in the investigation of property crime. This ground-breaking book examines the experiences of patrol officers, command staff, detectives, and chiefs as they navigate the expectations of forensic evidence in criminal cases, specifically property crimes cases. DNA and Property Crime Scene Investigation looks at the current state of forensic technology and, using interviews with police officers, command staff, forensic technicians, and prosecutors, elucidates who is doing the work of forensic investigation. It explores how better training can decrease backlogs in forensic evidence processing and prevent mishandling of crucial evidence. Concluding with a police chief’s perspective on the approach, DNA and Property Crime Scene Investigation provides insight into an emerging and important approach to property crime scene investigation. Key Features Provides practical information on implementing forensic investigation for property crimes Examines the current state of forensic technology and points to future trends Includes a police chief’s perspective on the forensic approach to investigating property crimes Utilizes interviews with professionals in the field to demonstrate the benefits of the approach

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