Provides a clear nonintimidating foundation in mathematics which develops students' ability to handle mathematics with confidence. Focus is on providing mathematical understanding and developing manipulative skills.
Key Features * Mathematical institutions in France and Germany and their role in promoting applications * Relationship between mathematics and physics * Foundations of mathematics * Complex variable theory, geometry and topology * Geometry in the spirit of Klein's Erlangen program * Algebra and number theory * Formative influences on mathematics in the United States
With applications to climate, technology, and industry, the modeling and numerical simulation of turbulent flows are rich with history and modern relevance. The complexity of the problems that arise in the study of turbulence requires tools from various scientific disciplines, including mathematics, physics, engineering and computer science. Authored by two experts in the area with a long history of collaboration, this monograph provides a current, detailed look at several turbulence models from both the theoretical and numerical perspectives. The k-epsilon, large-eddy simulation and other models are rigorously derived and their performance is analyzed using benchmark simulations for real-world turbulent flows. Mathematical and Numerical Foundations of Turbulence Models and Applications is an ideal reference for students in applied mathematics and engineering, as well as researchers in mathematical and numerical fluid dynamics. It is also a valuable resource for advanced graduate students in fluid dynamics, engineers, physical oceanographers, meteorologists and climatologists.
Introduction to the Calculus of Variations and Control with Modern Applications provides the fundamental background required to develop rigorous necessary conditions that are the starting points for theoretical and numerical approaches to modern variational calculus and control problems. The book also presents some classical sufficient conditions and discusses the importance of distinguishing between the necessary and sufficient conditions. In the first part of the text, the author develops the calculus of variations and provides complete proofs of the main results. He explains how the ideas behind the proofs are essential to the development of modern optimization and control theory. Focusing on optimal control problems, the second part shows how optimal control is a natural extension of the classical calculus of variations to more complex problems. By emphasizing the basic ideas and their mathematical development, this book gives you the foundation to use these mathematical tools to then tackle new problems. The text moves from simple to more complex problems, allowing you to see how the fundamental theory can be modified to address more difficult and advanced challenges. This approach helps you understand how to deal with future problems and applications in a realistic work environment.
Concise and readable, this introductory treatment examines logic and the concept of abstract reasoning as applied to the empirical world, as well as logic and statistical method, probability, scientific models, and more. 1944 edition.
Many mathematical statistics texts are heavily oriented toward a rigorous mathematical development of probability and statistics, without much attention paid to how statistics is actually used.. In contrast, Modern Mathematical Statistics with Applications, Second Edition strikes a balance between mathematical foundations and statistical practice. In keeping with the recommendation that every math student should study statistics and probability with an emphasis on data analysis, accomplished authors Jay Devore and Kenneth Berk make statistical concepts and methods clear and relevant through careful explanations and a broad range of applications involving real data. The main focus of the book is on presenting and illustrating methods of inferential statistics that are useful in research. It begins with a chapter on descriptive statistics that immediately exposes the reader to real data. The next six chapters develop the probability material that bridges the gap between descriptive and inferential statistics. Point estimation, inferences based on statistical intervals, and hypothesis testing are then introduced in the next three chapters. The remainder of the book explores the use of this methodology in a variety of more complex settings. This edition includes a plethora of new exercises, a number of which are similar to what would be encountered on the actuarial exams that cover probability and statistics. Representative applications include investigating whether the average tip percentage in a particular restaurant exceeds the standard 15%, considering whether the flavor and aroma of Champagne are affected by bottle temperature or type of pour, modeling the relationship between college graduation rate and average SAT score, and assessing the likelihood of O-ring failure in space shuttle launches as related to launch temperature.
Foundation Numeracy in Context describes an approach to teaching mathematics based on applied and contextual learning principles. This means that the teaching and learning of mathematics proceeds from a contextual, task-based and investigative point of viewâwhere the mathematics involved is developed from a modelled situation or practical task. Practical investigations and projects are principle vehicles for student learning in such an approach. This text is written for teachers working with students who have become disengaged from learning mathematics during the middle to latter years of secondary schooling, and will likely have had limited success with mathematics. The approach used will be helpful for teachers of students who need a practical rather than formal mathematical background for their everyday life skills and further education, training or career aspirations. The text illustrates how this approach works through some sample contexts such as cars and driving, sport, cooking and catering, and draws together mathematics from the areas of number, measurement, space, data and statistics, and algebra. [Publisher].
This 2001 book will appeal to mathematicians and philosophers interested in the foundations of mathematics.
Mathematical analysis is fundamental to the undergraduate curriculum not only because it is the stepping stone for the study of advanced analysis, but also because of its applications to other branches of mathematics, physics, and engineering at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. This self-contained textbook consists of eleven chapters, which are further divided into sections and subsections. Each section includes a careful selection of special topics covered that will serve to illustrate the scope and power of various methods in real analysis. The exposition is developed with thorough explanations, motivating examples, exercises, and illustrations conveying geometric intuition in a pleasant and informal style to help readers grasp difficult concepts. Foundations of Mathematical Analysis is intended for undergraduate students and beginning graduate students interested in a fundamental introduction to the subject. It may be used in the classroom or as a self-study guide without any required prerequisites.
Traces the development of mathematics from its beginnings in Babylonia and ancient Egypt to the work of Riemann and Godel in modern times
Presents a humorous look at the concepts of "new math."
Mathematical modelling of physiological systems promises to advance our understanding of complex biological phenomena and pathophysiology of diseases. In this book, the authors adopt a mathematical approach to characterize and explain the functioning of the gastrointestinal system. Using the mathematical foundations of thin shell theory, the authors patiently and comprehensively guide the reader through the fundamental theoretical concepts, via step-by-step derivations and mathematical exercises, from basic theory to complex physiological models. Applications to nonlinear problems related to the biomechanics of abdominal viscera and the theoretical limitations are discussed. Special attention is given to questions of complex geometry of organs, effects of boundary conditions on pellet propulsion, as well as to clinical conditions, e.g. functional dyspepsia, intestinal dysrhythmias and the effect of drugs to treat motility disorders. With end of chapter problems, this book is ideal for bioengineers and applied mathematicians.
The past decade has seen a renewal in the close ties between mathematics and physics. The Chicago Summer Seminar on Applications of Group Theory in Physics and Mathematical Physics, held in July, 1982, was organized to bring together a broad spectrum of scientists from theoretical physics, mathematical physics, and various branches of pure and applied mathematics in order to promote interaction and an exchange of ideas and results in areas of common interest. This volume contains the papers submitted by speakers at the Seminar. The reader will find several groups of articles varying from the most abstract aspects of mathematics to a concrete phenomenological description of some models applicable to particle physics. The papers have been divided into four categories corresponding to the principal topics covered at the Seminar. This is only a rough division, and some papers overlap two or more of these categories.
The transition from school mathematics to university mathematics is seldom straightforward. Students are faced with a disconnect between the algorithmic and informal attitude to mathematics at school, versus a new emphasis on proof, based on logic, and a more abstract development of general concepts, based on set theory. The authors have many years' experience of the potential difficulties involved, through teaching first-year undergraduates and researching the ways in which students and mathematicians think. The book explains the motivation behind abstract foundational material based on students' experiences of school mathematics, and explicitly suggests ways students can make sense of formal ideas. This second edition takes a significant step forward by not only making the transition from intuitive to formal methods, but also by reversing the process- using structure theorems to prove that formal systems have visual and symbolic interpretations that enhance mathematical thinking. This is exemplified by a new chapter on the theory of groups. While the first edition extended counting to infinite cardinal numbers, the second also extends the real numbers rigorously to larger ordered fields. This links intuitive ideas in calculus to the formal epsilon-delta methods of analysis. The approach here is not the conventional one of 'nonstandard analysis', but a simpler, graphically based treatment which makes the notion of an infinitesimal natural and straightforward. This allows a further vision of the wider world of mathematical thinking in which formal definitions and proof lead to amazing new ways of defining, proving, visualising and symbolising mathematics beyond previous expectations.
Measure and integration, metric spaces, the elements of functional analysis in Banach spaces, and spectral theory in Hilbert spaces — all in a single study. Only book of its kind. Unusual topics, detailed analyses. Problems. Excellent for first-year graduate students, almost any course on modern analysis. Preface. Bibliography. Index.
This volume constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 35th International Symposium on Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science, MFCS 2010, held in Brno, Czech Republic, in August 2010. The 56 revised full papers presented together with 5 invited talks were carefully reviewed and selected from 149 submissions. Topics covered include algorithmic game theory, algorithmic learning theory, algorithms and data structures, automata, grammars and formal languages, bioinformatics, complexity, computational geometry, computer-assisted reasoning, concurrency theory, cryptography and security, databases and knowledge-based systems, formal specifications and program development, foundations of computing, logic in computer science, mobile computing, models of computation, networks, parallel and distributed computing, quantum computing, semantics and verification of programs, and theoretical issues in artificial intelligence.
Definitive look at modern analysis, with views of applications to statistics, numerical analysis, Fourier series, differential equations, mathematical analysis, and functional analysis. More than 750 exercises; some hints and solutions. 1981 edition.
This 1997 book views the substantive achievements of the Middle Ages as they relate to early modern science.
Phase space, ergodic problems, central limit theorem, dispersion and distribution of sum functions. Chapters include Geometry and Kinematics of the Phase Space; Reduction to the Problem of the Theory of Probability; and more.

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