Despite a burgeoning debate on substantive issues in IPE, little attention has been devoted to its theoretical foundations. In this important new text, Matthew Watson reviews the main current theoretical approaches to IPE and highlights the problems that arise from treating 'states' and 'markets' as separate and contesting units of analysis. Foremost among these problems is the lack of attention given to theorizing the constitution of the individual as both an economic agent and a moral being.
Despite a burgeoning debate on substantive issues in IPE, little attention has been devoted to its theoretical foundations. In this important new text, Matthew Watson reviews the main current theoretical approaches to IPE and highlights the problems that arise from treating 'states' and 'markets' as separate and contesting units of analysis. Foremost among these problems is the lack of attention given to theorizing the constitution of the individual as both an economic agent and a moral being.
Ideally suited to upper-undergraduate and graduate students, Analyzing the Global Political Economy critically assesses the convergence between IPE, comparative political economy, and economics. Andrew Walter and Gautam Sen show that a careful engagement with economics is essential for understanding both contemporary IPE and for analyzing the global political economy. The authors also argue that the deployment of more advanced economic theories should not detract from the continuing importance for IPE of key concepts from political science and international relations. IPE students with little or no background in economics will therefore find this book useful, and economics students interested in political economy will be alerted to the comparative strengths of political science and other social science disciplines. A concise look at the foundations of analysis in the political economy of global trade, money, finance, and investment Suitable for upper-undergraduate and graduate students with some or no economic background Techniques and findings from a range of academic disciplines, including international relations, political science, economics, sociology, and history Further reading and useful weblinks including a range of relevant data sources, listed in each chapter
This book brings together leading contributors to explore the development of political economy in eighteenth century France from an interdisciplinary perspective, in particular the ideas for social reform proposed before the Revolution. Political economy in the Eighteenth century encompassed not only what we traditionally regard as economics but also moral philosophy, natural jurisprudence and political theory. This volume explores the different arguments that were made for reforming the economic organisation of the Ancien Régime before the French Revolution. In doing so, the contributors show that political economy in France laid the foundation for social reform ideas throughout the whole of the eighteenth century.
No approach to world affairs in the 21st century can afford to ignore the impact that processes of globalisation are having on governments, economies, cultures, and individuals. An understanding of the theories that underpin International Political Economy, and their practical applications, is therefore crucial to the study of international relations, politics, development and economics. In this comprehensive and accessible introduction to the field, the authors consider traditional and alternative approaches to IPE, elucidating key concepts, assumptions and the intellectual and historical context in which they arose and developed – making clear at all times their relevance to issues from trade finance and government, to environment, technology, development and culture. The style of this book encourages independent reflection and critical thinking. Each chapter relates theoretical analysis to contemporary issues, by way of giving the student a better understanding of the theory, and also demonstrating the value of theory in the real world.
Written between 1857 and 1858, the Grundrisse is the first draft of Marx’s critique of political economy and, thus, also the initial preparatory work on Capital. Despite its editorial vicissitudes and late publication, Grundrisse contains numerous reflections on matters that Marx did not develop elsewhere in his oeuvre and is therefore extremely important for an overall interpretation of his thought. In this collection, various international experts in the field, analysing the Grundrisse on the 150th anniversary of its composition, present a Marx in many ways radically different from the one who figures in the dominant currents of twentieth-century Marxism. The book demonstrates the relevance of the Grundrisse to an understanding of Capital and of Marx’s theoretical project as a whole, which, as is well known, remained uncompleted. It also highlights the continuing explanatory power of Marxian categories for contemporary society and its present contradictions. With contributions from such scholars as Eric Hobsbawm and Terrell Carver, and covering subject areas such as political economy, philosophy and Marxism, this book is likely to become required reading for serious scholars of Marx across the world.
Since the 1990s many of the assumptions that anchored the study of governance in international political economy have been shaken loose. Reflecting on the intriguing and important processes of change that have occurred, and are occurring, Professors Antho
Eric Helleiner's new book provides a powerful corrective to conventional accounts of the negotiations at Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, in 1944. These negotiations resulted in the creation of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank—the key international financial institutions of the postwar global economic order. Critics of Bretton Woods have argued that its architects devoted little attention to international development issues or the concerns of poorer countries. On the basis of extensive historical research and access to new archival sources, Helleiner challenges these assumptions, providing a major reinterpretation that will interest all those concerned with the politics and history of the global economy, North-South relations, and international development. The Bretton Woods architects—who included many officials and analysts from poorer regions of the world—discussed innovative proposals that anticipated more contemporary debates about how to reconcile the existing liberal global economic order with the development aspirations of emerging powers such as India, China, and Brazil. Alongside the much-studied Anglo-American relationship was an overlooked but pioneering North-South dialogue. Helleiner’s unconventional history brings to light not only these forgotten foundations of the Bretton Woods system but also their subsequent neglect after World War II.
The nature of the contemporary global political economy and the significance of the current crisis are a matter of wide-ranging intellectual and political debate, which has contributed to a revival of interest in Marx’s critique of political economy. This book interrogates such a critique within the broader framework of the history of political economy, and offers a new appreciation of its contemporary relevance. A distinctive feature of this study is its use of the new historical critical edition of the writings of Marx and Engels (MEGA2), their partially unpublished notebooks in particular. The sheer volume of this material forces a renewed encounter with Marx. It demonstrates that the international sphere and non-European societies had an increasing importance in his research, which developed the scientific elements elaborated by Marx’s predecessors. This book questions widespread assumptions that the nation-state was the starting point for the analysis of development. It explores the international foundations of political economy, from mercantilism to Adam Smith and David Ricardo and to Hegel, and investigates how the understanding of the international political economy informs the interpretations of history to which it gave rise. The book then traces the developments of Marx’s critique of political economy from the early 1840s to Capital Volume 1 and shows that his deepening understanding of the laws of capitalist uneven and combined development allowed him to recognise the growth of a world working class. Marx’s work thus offers the necessary categories to develop an alternative to methodological nationalism and Eurocentrism grounded in a critique of political economy. This book is essential reading for anyone interested in the development of Marx’s thought and in the foundations of International Political Economy.
This rigorously written book on the areas of Islamic principle theory and application is expected to break new ground in modern economic analysis, both for the Islamically inclined and others. The main features of the book include analytical treatments of the essential axioms and instruments of Islamic Political Economy, their expected application, and a comparative perspective both in respect to contemporary Islamic literature as well as comparative economic theory.
Matthew Watson draws a distinction between the spatial and the functional mobility of capital, allowing fresh insights into existing work on the subject whilst repoliticizing the very idea of capital being 'in motion'. The dynamics of capital mobility and the patterns of risk exposure are illustrated through four detailed global case studies.
Amidst the continued debate surrounding the foundations of IPE, coupled with recent methodological and theoretical divides this book argues that an attempt should be made to re-visit the notion of the 'critical'. The challenge posed by contributors to this volume is to assess the development of so-called critical IPE and interrogate whether the theoretical foundations it was built upon have reached their potential. The essays in this volume take up this challenge in a number of different ways but all share a common concern - to re-assess the purpose of critical approaches, reflect on why certain social theorists have been favoured as a point of departure, yet others have largely been ignored. In light of recent debates on the notion of a 'trans-Atlantic divide' within IPE the collection the contributors aim demonstrates how the distinction between the 'critical' and the 'orthodox' (or 'empirical') is only significant if the 'critical' is geared towards a larger, more substantial body of critical social enquiry and engages with what it means to conduct such enquiry.
What are the most fundamental differences among the political economies of the developed world? How do national institutional differences condition economic performance, public policy, and social well-being? Will they survive the pressures for convergence generated by globalization and technological change? These have long been central questions in comparative political economy. This book provides a new and coherent set of answers to them. Building on the new economics of organization, the authors develop an important new theory about which differences among national political economies are most significant for economic policy and performance. Drawing on a distinction between 'liberal' and 'coordinated' market economies, they argue that there is more than one path to economic success. Nations need not converge to a single Anglo-American model. They develop a new theory of 'comparative institutionaladvantage' that transforms our understanding of international trade, offers new explanations for the response of firms and nations to the challenges of globalization, and provides a new theory of national interest to explain the conduct of nations in international relations. The analysis brings the firm back into the centre of comparative political economy. It provides new perspectives on economic and social policy-making that illuminate the role of business in the development of the welfare state and the dilemmas facing those who make economic policy in the contemporary world. Emphasizing the 'institutional complementarities' that link labour relations, corporate finance, and national legal systems, the authors bring interdisciplinary perspectives to bear on issues of strategic management, economic performance, and institutional change. This pathbreaking work sets new agendas in the study of comparative political economy. As such, it will be of value to academics and graduate students in economics, business, and political science, as well as to many others with interests in international relations, social policy-making, and the law.
In a systematic study of the political economy of East Asia, Cai adopts an historical perspective alongside a contemporary focus, exploring East Asia's development since the late 19th century. Following similar paths to economic development, East Asian states have achieved economic success, integrating themselves into a regional economy.
The fourth edition of this popular and successful text has been systematically revised and updated to incorporate analysis of the financial crisis and the changing global order. Now in a larger format with a new two-colour text design, the book includes additional boxed exhibits and end-of-chapter further reading. Williams, Uni NSW.
Although many international political economy texts offer good descriptions of what events have occurred in global economic and political relations, they fail to develop explicit theoretical frameworks explaining why. Andrew C. Sobel's International Political Economy in Context: Individual Choices, Global Effects takes a micro approach to IPE, grounding policy choices in the deliberations and competitive environs of domestic politics and decision-making processes. Sobel builds students' skills for a sophisticated understanding of how and why events unfold in the international political economy. Armed with the primary assumptions and structural/macro conditions of economic and political geography in the global arena, as well as an understanding of micro-level conditions and mechanisms and their shortfalls that influence political and economic outcomes, students are able to make sense of past and present changes in the global political economy. International Political Economy in Context offers a compelling, accessible, and fully integrated rational choice perspective on international political economy.
'Erudite and accessible, McCann demonstrates how the national gets reconfigured around the global without losing some of its unique features. Far from being a one-size-fits-all Anglo-American template, neoliberalism comes in many different hues and variations. This is by far the best textbook in the field and is destined to become a classic for years to come.' Manfred B. Steger, Professor of Political Science at the University of Hawai'i-Manoa, Honolulu, Hawai’i, USA 'A sweeping examination of systems of capitalism in theory and in the world’s major industrial economies leads Leo McCann to challenge the conventional wisdom on globalization. Historical analysis of the evolution of business systems and detailed examination of present practice demonstrate persuasively that, despite facing common challenges, distinctive national differences remain salient. A must read for anyone who needs to understand how business systems operate in an increasingly interdependent world economy.' - Dr Eileen Appelbaum, Senior Economist, Center for Economic and Policy Research, Washington, DC, USA Globalization has profound effects on national economies even as distinct national ‘models’ of capitalism remain. International and Comparative Business accessibly tracks the historical and socio-political contexts of the world’s major countries on a chapter-by-chapter basis to the present day. The book provides a comprehensive, critical, yet concise introduction to each of the economies’ key features, including macro overviews as well as organizational and workplace-level analysis. Each chapter features learning objectives, in-depth interpretation and critique of key literature, and annotated further reading to allow readers to rigorously navigate their way through the wealth of material available for each country. This text is essential reading for students and researchers in the areas of international business and cross-cultural management, comparative political economy, and history. Leo McCann is Senior Lecturer in International and Comparative Management at Manchester Business School, University of Manchester, UK
Prior to the 1970s, few serious efforts were made to bridge the gap between economics and political science in the study of international relations. Systematic scholarly analysis of International Political Economy (IPE), emphasizing formal integration of elements of orthodox market and political analysis, is really of very recent origin. This volume brings together some of the most important research papers published in the modern field of IPE since its birth less than four decades ago, emphasizing work that has significantly advanced theoretical and analytical understandings. Coverage includes grand questions of systemic transformation and system governance as well as more narrowly focused explorations of the two most central issue-areas of the world economy, trade and money and finance. The introductory essay locates this selection of articles in the context of the field's broad evolution and development to date.
The authors have two purposes in this book, and they succeed admirably at both. They develop a general model of public policy making focused on the difficulties of securing intertemporal exchanges among politicians. They combine the tools of game theory with Williamson's transaction cost theory, North's institutional arguments, and contract theory to provide a general theory of public policy making in a comparative political economy setting. They also undertake a detailed study of Argentina, using statistical analyses on newly developed data to complement their nuanced account of institutions, rules, incentives and outcomes. Mariano Tommasi (Ph.D. in Economics, University of Chicago, 1991) is Professor of Economics at Universidad de San Andres in Argentina. He is past President (2004-2005) of the Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association. He has published articles in journals such as American Economic Review; American Journal of Political Science; American Political Science Review; Journal of Development Economic; Journal of Monetary Economics; International Economic Review; Economics and Politics; Journal of Law, Economics and Organization; Journal of Public Economic Theory; Journal of International Economics; and the Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics. He has held visiting positions in Economics, Business, and Political Science at Yale, Harvard, UCLA, Tel Aviv, and various Latin American universities. He has received various fellowships and awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2006. He has been an advisor to several Latin American governments and to international organizations such as the World Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank.

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