David Macey's biography of Frantz Fanon is acclaimed not only for its eloquence and its comprehensive account of Fanon's personal, intellectual and political life, but also for its rich depiction of postwar French culture. Frantz Fanon, now updated with new historical material, remains the definitive biography of the iconic thinker who inspired countless revolutions.
Born in Martinique, Frantz Fanon (1925–61) trained as a psychiatrist in Lyon before taking up a post in colonial Algeria. He had already experienced racism as a volunteer in the Free French Army, in which he saw combat at the end of the Second World War. In Algeria, Fanon came into contact with the Front de Libération Nationale, whose ruthless struggle for independence was met with exceptional violence from the French forces. He identified closely with the liberation movement, and his political sympathies eventually forced him out the country, whereupon he became a propagandist and ambassador for the FLN, as well as a seminal anticolonial theorist. David Macey’s eloquent life of Fanon provides a comprehensive account of a complex individual’s personal, intellectual and political development. It is also a richly detailed depiction of postwar French culture. Fanon is revealed as a flawed and passionate humanist deeply committed to eradicating colonialism. Now updated with new historical material, Frantz Fanon remains the definitive biography of a truly revolutionary thinker.
This book provides an innovative look at the reception of Frantz Fanon’s texts, investigating how, when, where and why these—especially his seminal Les Damnés de la Terre (1961) —were first translated and read. Building on renewed interest in the author’s works in both postcolonial studies and revolutionary movements in recent years, as well as travelling theory, micro-history and histoire croisée interests in Translation Studies, the volume tells the stories of translations of Fanon’s texts into twelve different languages – Arabic, Danish, English, German, Italian, Norwegian, Persian, Polish, Russian, Serbo-Croatian, Swahili and Swedish – bringing both a historical and multilingual perspective to the ways in which Fanon is cited today. With contributions from an international, interdisciplinary group of scholars, the stories told combine themes of movement and place, personal networks and agency, politics and activism, archival research and textual analysis, creating a book that is a fresh and comprehensive volume on the translated works of Frantz Fanon and essential reading for scholars in translation studies, postcolonial studies, cultural studies, critical race studies, and African and African diaspora literature.
This is a biography of Frantz Fanon. It presents an absorbing and careful ac count of several impressive themes. First is the review and assessment of Fanon's life. Second is a theory of psychology, by the author, which will aug ment and prove useful to theorists and practitioners who focus on Third World people. And lastly there is a broad and systematic integration of many areas of scholarship including philosophy, anthropology, political science, history, so ciology, mythology, public health, and economics. Bulhan's writing is lucid, creative, and persuasive. It demonstrates that all these scholarly areas must be handled with erudition in order to build a baseline for understanding both Fanon and the psychology of oppression. Readers of Fanon will be familiar with the psychology of oppression which he presented so forcefully. How life events and experiences led to the formula tion of this psychology is the chief emphasis of the author. Yet the book also gives scintillating clinical proof that Fanon made many other significant con tributions to his field. He was an outstanding and dedicated physician as well as a philosopher and political activist.
Frantz Fanon is best known as one of the leading twentieth-century political thinkers and activists against colonialism and imperialism and as the author of the iconic book ‘Wretched of the Earth’. Leo Zeilig here details the life of Fanon - from his upbringing in Martinique to his wartime experiences and work in Europe and North Africa - and frames his ideas and activism within the greater context of his career as a practising psychiatrist and his politically tumultuous surroundings. The book covers the period of the Algerian War of Independence, national liberation and what Fanon described ‘the curse of independence’. Highlighting Fanon’s role as the most influential theorist of third-world liberation, this book is an essential work for students, academics and general readers
Focusing on individual political thinkers and beginning with indigenous African political thought, the book successively examines African nationalism, African socialism, populism and Marxism, Africanism and pan-Africanism, concluding with contemporary perspectives on democracy, development and the African state.
A Short History of African Philosophy discusses major ideas, figures, and schools of thought in philosophy in the African context. While drawing out critical issues in the formation of African philosophy, Barry Hallen focuses on recent scholarship and relevant debates that have made African philosophy critical to understanding the rich and complex cultural heritage of the continent. This revised edition expands the historical perspective, takes account of recent discoveries and new canonical figures, highlights new discussions about gender as a cultural and philosophical phenomenon, clarifies issues regarding indigenous cultures and human rights, and builds on the notion that African philosophy shares methods and concerns of philosophy worldwide. This short reference is an essential resource for students, scholars, and general readers.
This "Lives and Legacies" biography pays tribute and commemorates the 40th anniversary of the death of Frantz Fanon (1925-1961), the prolific psychoanalyst and philosopher whose writings in the 1950's played a key role in the civil rights movement of the late 1960's and 1970's.
Returning seven years later to their original pieces from this landmark book, over 20 leading scholars and activists revisit and reframe their rich contributions to a burgeoning scholarship on Whiteness. With new reflective writings for each chapter, and valuable sections on relevant readings and resources, this volume refreshes and enhances the first text to pay critical and sustained attention to Whiteness in education, with implications far beyond national borders. Contributors include George Sefa Dei, Tracey Lindberg, Carl James, Cynthia Levine-Rasky, and the late Patrick Solomon. Courageously examining diverse perspectives, contexts, and institutional practices, contributors to this volume dismantle the underpinnings of inequitable power relations, privilege, and marginalization. The book’s relevance extends to those in a range of settings, with abundant and poignant lessons for enhancing and understanding transformative social justice work in education. Revisiting The Great White North? offers terrific grist for examining the persistence of Whiteness even as it shape-shifts. Chapters are comprehensive, theoretically rich, and anchored in personal experience. Authors’ reflections on the seven years since publication of the first edition of this book complexify how we understand Whiteness, while simultaneously driving home the need not only to grapple with it, but to work against it. Christine Sleeter, Professor Emerita, California State University Monterey Bay Our understanding of racial inequities in education will be impoverished unless we look deeply at White privilege, its variation in different contexts, and resistances to change. Such is the call in this important book by Lund, Carr, and colleagues, whose analyses within Canadian contexts, framed and re-framed for this captivating revised edition, will be useful to educators and scholars around the world. Read this book today. Kevin Kumashiro, Dean, School of Education, University of San Francisco; President, National Association for Multicultural Education Darren Lund and Paul Carr have given the contributors to their original 2007 text the opportunity to revisit, rethink, reconceptualize, and reframe their earlier work. The result is an interesting, invigorating, and unsettling group of chapters that challenge readers to also revisit and rethink their own ideas about Whiteness, privilege, and power .... Teachers, administrators, policymakers, and researchers will all benefit from this critical work. Sonia Nieto, Professor Emerita, Language, Literacy, and Culture College of Education, University of Massachusetts, Amherst Lund and Carr bring together a superb collection of authors who collectively challenge readers to go beyond liberal platitudes about race ... until educators confront the political, social and economic consequences of inequitably distributed privilege, the path towards equality and freedom will remain elusive. By immersing us in the discourse of Whiteness, the essays in this book illuminate that very path. Joel Westheimer, University Research Chair & Professor, Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa
Drawing from the lives of Ossie Davis, Frantz Fanon, Malcolm X, and W. E. B. Du Bois, as well as his own experience, and fully updated to account for what has transpired since the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement, Yancy provides an invaluable resource for students and teachers of courses in African American Studies, African American History, Philosophy of Race, and anyone else who wishes to examine what it means to be Black in America.
Der globale Kapitalismus hat seit seiner Entstehung immer schon nicht nur Waren, sondern auch »Rassen« und »Spezies« produziert. Ihm liegt ein rassistisches Denken, eine »schwarze Vernunft« zugrunde, wie der große afrikanische Philosoph und Vordenker des Postkolonialismus Achille Mbembe in seinem brillanten und mitreißenden neuen Buch zeigt. In kraftvollen Linien zeichnet Mbembe die Genese unserer Gegenwart nach, indem er darstellt, wie sich der globale Kapitalismus seit dem Beginn der Neuzeit aus dem transatlantischen Sklavenhandel entwickelt hat. In dieser Zeit steigt Europa zum Zentrum der Welt auf und kreiert die Figur des »Negers«, des »Menschen-Materials«, der »Menschen-Ware«, die über den »schwarzen Atlantik« gehandelt wird. Mit dem Abolitionismus, der Revolution in Haiti, dem Antikolonialismus oder der amerikanischen Bürgerrechtsbewegung kommt zwar seit der Aufklärung eine erste globale Welle der Kritik an der Sklaverei und der »schwarzen Vernunft« des Kapitalismus auf. Dieser breitet sich jedoch in seiner neoliberalen Spielart unaufhaltsam weiter aus und überträgt die Figur des »Negers« nun auf die gesamte »subalterne Menschheit«. In diesem Prozess des »Schwarzwerdens der Welt«, so die radikale Kritik Mbembes, bilden auch Europa und seine Bürger mittlerweile nur noch eine weitere Provinz im weltumspannenden Imperium des neoliberalen Kapitalismus.
Until the 1993 first edition of this book, one thing had been missing in Middle Eastern history—depiction of the lives of ordinary Middle Eastern men and women, peasants, villagers, pastoralists, and urbanites. Now updated and revised, the second edition has added six new portraits of individuals set in the contemporary period. It features twenty-four brief biographies drawn from throughout the Middle East—from Morocco to Afghanistan—in which the reader is provided with vantage points from which to understand modern Middle Eastern history "from the bottom up." Spanning the past 160-plus years and reflecting important transformations, these stories challenge elite-centered accounts of what has occurred in the Middle East and illuminate the previously hidden corners of a largely unrecorded world.
“Fanon was consummately incapable of telling the story of himself. He lived in the immediacy of the moment, with an intensity that embodied everything he evoked. Fanon’s discourse pertained to a present tense that was unburdened by its narrative past. Th

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