French Sociology offers a uniquely comprehensive view of the oldest and still one of the most vibrant national traditions in sociology. Johan Heilbron covers the development of sociology in France from its beginnings in the early nineteenth century through the discipline's expansion in the late twentieth century, tracing the careers of figures from Auguste Comte to Pierre Bourdieu. Presenting fresh interpretations of how renowned thinkers such as Émile Durkheim and his collaborators defined the contours and content of the discipline and contributed to intellectual renewals in a wide range of other human sciences, Heilbron's sophisticated book is both an innovative sociological study and a major reference work in the history of the social sciences. Heilbron recounts the halting process by which sociology evolved from a new and improbable science into a legitimate academic discipline. Having entered the academic field at the end of the nineteenth century, sociology developed along two separate tracks: one in the Faculty of Letters, engendering an enduring dependence on philosophy and the humanities, the other in research institutes outside of the university, in which sociology evolved within and across more specialized research areas. Distinguishing different dynamics and various cycles of change, Heilbron portrays the ways in which individuals and groups maneuvered within this changing structure, seizing opportunities as they arose. French Sociology vividly depicts the promises and pitfalls of a discipline that up to this day remains one of the most interdisciplinary endeavors among the human sciences in France.
This book delivers a top-down understanding of relation as a macro-phenomenon in society. This understanding rests on the reconstruction of an ongoing debate in the French tradition about the purpose of a relational perspective in sociology and the social sciences. Christian Papilloud analyzes the cardinal steps of this debate, which historically relate to the concept of solidarity, expressing an ideal of social cohesion through relationships between personal and non-personal actors. In social theory, it is well-known that solidarity refers to Emile Durkheim. But little is known about the controversies generated in relation to the purpose of a relational perspective in sociology. Papilloud reconstructs and follows the most important of these controversies in a comparative perspective, beginning with Emile Durkheim and Gaston Richard on solidarity, Richard and Marcel Mauss on sacrifice and magic, Mauss and Pierre Bourdieu on gift and social positions, Bourdieu and Bruno Latour on the objects of exchanges and institutions, and Latour and Durkheim on reciprocity and control. These comparisons give shape to a theoretical framework for a 'sociology through relation.
An invisible pattern draws together most studies dealing with French cultural radicalism in the 1960s with intellectual creation reduced to individual creation and the role of semiotic and social factors that influence intellectual innovation minimized. Sociological approaches often see a more or less external link between social location and intellectual production but, because of their structural approach, they are incapable of taking into account unique historical circumstances, the crucial role of personal impulses, and more importantly the semiotic logic of ideas as conditions of innovative thinking. This ground-breaking book will further an internal sociological analysis of ideas and styles of thought. It will show that the defining but largely neglected feature of what has become "French theory" was a collective mind and style of thought, an explosive but fragile mixture of scientific and political radicalism that rather quickly watered down to academic orthodoxy. For some time, radical intellectuals succeeded in producing ideas that were perfectly in tune with the demands of the consumers, mostly the young university audience. Ideas were used as part of radical posture that was set in opposition to the establishment and "those in power". Ideas could not be too empirical or verifiable, and they had to shock. It is not surprising that a slew of new sciences and concepts were invented to indicate this radical posture. The central argument of this study is that ideas become "power-ideas" only if they succeed in uniting individual and collective psychic investment in powerful social networks with significant institutional and political backing. These conditions were met in the French context for a certain specific period of time. From roughly the mid-1960s to the beginning of the 1970s, radical intellectuals such as Roland Barthes, Pierre Bourdieu, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Julia Kristeva developed a host of new ideas, concepts and theories, a number of which have subsequently been labelled as French theory.
In Bourdieu in Question: New Directions in French Sociology of Art, Jeffrey A. Halley and Daglind E. Sonolet offer an account of the very lively Francophone debates over Pierre Bourdieu's work in the domain of the arts and culture.
Informed by a modified version of Goffman’s original concept of the total organization, A Sociology of the Total Organization untangles the French Foreign Legion and the ways in which different kinds of social orders interplay there. This book shows how atomistic unity is not limited to greedy organizations such as the military, but applies to a variety of collectivist settings.
Translation of two works: Sociologie, first published in 1901 in La grande encyclopedie; and, Divisions et proportions des divisions de la sociologie, first published in 1927.
In the late 1980s Wacquant, a white, French-born, French and American sociology graduate student, entered the Woodlawn gym on 63rd Street in Chicago and began training as a boxer. This text invites us to follow Wacquant's immersion into the everyday world of Chicago's boxers.
This book offers conceptual discourse, empirical evidence, application of existing and emerging theories, and implication of practical findings. It discusses the perspectives of both providers and recipients of quality services across a wide spectrum of hospitality and tourism sectors.
Pierre Bourdieu has been making a distinguished contribution to European sociology for the past 25 years. He is Professor of Sociology at the Collge de France in Paris and author of many influential books including, most recently, Distinction and Homo Academicus, which have both been translated into English. This book serves to introduce this important body of work to the Anglo-American world. In a cross-disciplinary collaboration Richard Harker, Cheleen Mahar and Chris Wilkes provide the reader with the necessary tools to understand this complex and rewarding body of French sociology. Post modernist sociology has already been influenced by the French theorist Foucault; it is likely that the generation to come will be reading Bourdieu.
Marcel Mauss's writings on techniques and technology are at the forefront of an important anthropological and sociological research tradition, and they also highlight the theoretical and ideological challenges surrounding this field of study. A selection of Mauss's texts - including his major statements on methodology, on body techniques, on practical reason, on nation and civilisation, on progress, and so forth - are here translated and presented together for the first time, with a discussion of their context, impact and implications. This book will interest scholars and students dealing with the French sociological tradition, and also more generally those concerned with technology and material culture studies in archaeological,anthropological or contemporary settings.
Breaking with the exoticizing cast of public discourse and conventional research, Urban Outcasts takes the reader inside the black ghetto of Chicago and the deindustrializing banlieue of Paris to discover that urban marginality is not everywhere the same. Drawing on a wealth of original field, survey and historical data, Loïc Wacquant shows that the involution of America's urban core after the 1960s is due not to the emergence of an 'underclass', but to the joint withdrawal of market and state fostered by public policies of racial separation and urban abandonment. In European cities, by contrast, the spread of districts of 'exclusion' does not herald the formation of ghettos. It stems from the decomposition of working-class territories under the press of mass unemployment, the casualization of work and the ethnic mixing of populations hitherto segregated, spawning urban formations akin to 'anti-ghettos'. Comparing the US 'Black Belt' with the French 'Red Belt' demonstrates that state structures and policies play a decisive role in the articulation of class, race and place on both sides of the Atlantic. It also reveals the crystallization of a new regime of marginality fuelled by the fragmentation of wage labour, the retrenchment of the social state and the concentration of dispossessed categories in stigmatized areas bereft of a collective idiom of identity and claims-making. These defamed districts are not just the residual 'sinkholes' of a bygone economic era, but also the incubators of the precarious proletariat emerging under neoliberal capitalism. Urban Outcasts sheds new light on the explosive mix of mounting misery, stupendous affluence and festering street violence resurging in the big cities of the First World. By specifying the different causal paths and experiential forms assumed by relegation in the American and the French metropolis, this book offers indispensable tools for rethinking urban marginality and for reinvigorating the public debate over social inequality and citizenship at century's dawn.
From a sociological perspective, it is generally assumed that actors in society will engage in collective action in order to meet their individual needs and interests. As initially argued by Bourdieu, but also by institutional theorists (Scott, 1995 ; Zucker, 1987), much of this engagement will be tacit and taken for granted. Although scholars stemming from a critical perspective highlight the hegemony of these explanations of coordinated action (Alvesson & Willmott, 2002 ; Willmott, 1993), they say little about the capacity of ordinary actors to mobilize their critical competencies in order to resist such hegemony. If one works from the premise that organizational actors dispose of critical competencies, how do they mobilize these in practice and what implications does this mobilization have on our understanding of coordination and organizational processes more broadly ? This is one of the central questions posed by Boltanski and Thévenot when they embarked on the writing of On Justification (1991, 2006), considered by some to be the most important sociological treatise in post-Bourdieu French sociology (Baert & Carreira da Silva, 2010, p. 43). The articles in this volume explore how mobilizing Boltanski and Thévenot's economies of worth framework, and its associated concepts of justification, evaluation, and critique, help address questions regarding the premises and dynamics of coordinated action, both within and across organizations, and by so doing help advance our understanding of organizational processes more generally.
A classic text about the social study of food, this is the first English language edition of Jean-Pierre Poulain's seminal work. Tracing the history of food scholarship, The Sociology of Food provides an overview of sociological theory and its relevance to the field of food. Divided into two parts, Poulain begins by exploring the continuities and changes in the modern diet. From the effect of globalization on food production and supply, to evolving cultural responses to food – including cooking and eating practices, the management of consumer anxieties, and concerns over obesity and the medicalization of food – the first part examines how changing food practices have shaped and are shaped by wider social trends. The second part provides an overview of the emergence of food as an academic focus for sociologists and anthropologists. Revealing the obstacles that lay in the way of this new field of study, Poulain shows how the discipline was first established and explains its development over the last forty years. Destined to become a key text for students and scholars, The Sociology of Food makes a major contribution to food studies and sociology. This edition features a brand new chapter focusing on the development of food studies in the English-speaking world and a preface, specifically written for the edition.
This 2001 book is a critique of Comte's concept of religion and its place in his thinking on politics, sociology and philosophy of science.
1. Introduction, W G Runciman The View from Within 2. The History of Sociology in Britain, A H Halsey 3. What Should be Done About the History of Sociology?, Jennifer Platt 4. Sociology in Briatin in the Twentieth Century: Differentiation and Establishment, Martin Bulmer The View from Without 5. Sociology and Social History: Partnership, Rivalry, or Mutual Incomprehension?, Roderick Floud and Pat Thane 6. Not Really a View from Without: the Relations of Social Anthropology and Sociology, J D Y Peel 7. Demography's British History and its Relation to Sociology, John Ermisch The View from Abroad 8. The View from a French Sociologist, Dominique Schnapper 9. A View from Sweden, Robert Erikson 10. A View from Europe, Colin Crouch 11. Some General Remarks, John Scott.

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