French Sociology offers a uniquely comprehensive view of the oldest and still one of the most vibrant national traditions in sociology. Johan Heilbron covers the development of sociology in France from its beginnings in the early nineteenth century through the discipline's expansion in the late twentieth century, tracing the careers of figures from Auguste Comte to Pierre Bourdieu. Presenting fresh interpretations of how renowned thinkers such as Émile Durkheim and his collaborators defined the contours and content of the discipline and contributed to intellectual renewals in a wide range of other human sciences, Heilbron's sophisticated book is both an innovative sociological study and a major reference work in the history of the social sciences. Heilbron recounts the halting process by which sociology evolved from a new and improbable science into a legitimate academic discipline. Having entered the academic field at the end of the nineteenth century, sociology developed along two separate tracks: one in the Faculty of Letters, engendering an enduring dependence on philosophy and the humanities, the other in research institutes outside of the university, in which sociology evolved within and across more specialized research areas. Distinguishing different dynamics and various cycles of change, Heilbron portrays the ways in which individuals and groups maneuvered within this changing structure, seizing opportunities as they arose. French Sociology vividly depicts the promises and pitfalls of a discipline that up to this day remains one of the most interdisciplinary endeavors among the human sciences in France.
Tracing the evolution of French sociology from the early twentieth century to the present day, this insightful book brings to the fore the renowned origins but relatively slow development of the discipline in France. Divided into four chronological sections it focuses on the social changes and institutional transformations that have impacted on the history of sociology in France as it relates to both higher education and research. In doing so, it draws attention to three major features of French sociology: the imbalance between theory and method caused by its philosophical roots, the difficulty of locating it in relation to other disciplines, and the close links between sociology and political thought and action.
1. Introduction, W G Runciman The View from Within 2. The History of Sociology in Britain, A H Halsey 3. What Should be Done About the History of Sociology?, Jennifer Platt 4. Sociology in Briatin in the Twentieth Century: Differentiation and Establishment, Martin Bulmer The View from Without 5. Sociology and Social History: Partnership, Rivalry, or Mutual Incomprehension?, Roderick Floud and Pat Thane 6. Not Really a View from Without: the Relations of Social Anthropology and Sociology, J D Y Peel 7. Demography's British History and its Relation to Sociology, John Ermisch The View from Abroad 8. The View from a French Sociologist, Dominique Schnapper 9. A View from Sweden, Robert Erikson 10. A View from Europe, Colin Crouch 11. Some General Remarks, John Scott.
No national tradition of social theory has been more seductive to Anglo-American readers than the French.There has been a long-standing fascination with French ideas and debates. This extraordinarily accomplished book, written by one of Britain's leading commentators on social theory, provides a peerless account of the French tradition.The book: provides a systematic account of French social theory from the aftermath of the French Revolution (St Simon, Bazard and Comte) to the contemporary scene dominated by Kristeva, Deleuze, Bourdieu and Baudrillard; divides French social theory into three logically coherent cycles: 1800-80 (positivist); 1880-1940 (anthropological); 1940-2000 (Marxist); provides a detailed guide to the three phases of postwar French social theory - existential, structural and post-structural; and situates the discussions of individuals and schools in the relevant social and political contexts. The book is a masterpiece of erudition and scholarship but is written throughout in an engaging and informative style. It will be required reading for anyone interested in social theory and sociology.
The term 'Popular Music' has traditionally denoted different things in France and Britain. In France, the very concept of 'popular' music has been fiercely debated and contested, whereas in Britain and more largely throughout what the French describe as the 'Anglo-saxon' world 'popular music' has been more readily accepted as a description of what people do as leisure or consume as part of the music industry, and as something that academics are legitimately entitled to study. French researchers have for some decades been keenly interested in reading British and American studies of popular culture and popular music and have often imported key concepts and methodologies into their own work on French music, but apart from the widespread use of elements of 'French theory' in British and American research, the 'Anglo-saxon' world has remained largely ignorant of particular traditions of the study of popular music in France and specific theoretical debates or organizational principles of the making and consuming of French musics. French, British and American research into popular music has thus coexisted – with considerable cross-fertilization – for many years, but the barriers of language and different academic traditions have made it hard for French and anglophone researchers to fully appreciate the ways in which popular music has developed in their respective countries and the perspectives on its study adopted by their colleagues. This volume provides a comparative and contrastive perspective on popular music and its study in France and the UK.
Emile Durkheim, one of the founding fathers of sociology, has been the subject of many studies. But this book is the first to introduce the individual and collective work of his colleagues and disciples who formed with him the 'French school of sociology'. Such an association of talented scholars was a unique event in the history of sociology and a decisive landmark in the development of the discipline. In this book, examination of the texts of the Durkheimians is combined with analysis of the social and intellectual group attempted to create a new social science. In this respect, the present book is also instructive about the birth and institutionalisation of academic disciplines in general. But studying the work of the Durkheimians goes beyond historical research; the Durkeimians can still offer lessons in the exploration of the territory of sociology, an area in which so much virgin land remains unmapped.
The Routledge Handbook of European Sociology explores the main aspects of the work and scholarship of European sociologists during the last sixty years (1950-2010), a period that has shaped the methods and identity of the sociological craft. European social theory has produced a vast constellation of theoretical landscapes with a far reaching impact. At the same time there has been diversity and fragmentation, the influence of American sociology, and the effect of social practice and transformations. The guiding question is: does European Sociology really exist today, and if the answer is positive, what does this really mean? Divided into four parts, the Handbook investigates: intellectual and institutional settings regional variations thematic variations European concerns. The Handbook will provides a set of state-of-the-art accounts that break new ground, each contribution teasing out the distinctively European features of the sociological theme it explores. It will be of interest to students and scholars across the social sciences and humanities.
First published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
French Historians 1900-2000: The New Historical Writing inTwentieth-Century France examines the lives and writings of 40of France’s great twentieth-century historians. Blends biography with critical analysis of major works, placingthe work of the French historians in the context of their lifestories Includes contributions from over 30 international scholars Provides English-speaking readers with a new insight into thekey French historians of the last century
Soziologen sind Beobachter und Interpreten der modernen Gesellschaft. Ihr soziologischer Blick kann jedoch niemals ein rein theoretischer sein, denn Soziologen sind Teil ihres Untersuchungsgegenstands, der Gesellschaft. Zu dieser unvermeidlichen Praxisnähe kommt für sie die Herausforderung, mit ihrem soziologischen Wissen Optionen zur gesellschaftlichen Entwicklung aufzeigen und die von ihnen beobachteten Strukturen und Prozesse beeinflussen zu können. Pierre Bourdieu und Ulrich Beck stehen als Soziologen und Intellektuelle mit ihrem Werk und ihrer Biographie für das Austesten der Grenze zwischen Wissenschaft und Politik. In zwei miteinander verknüpften Fallstudien werden ihre Grenzgänge nachvollzogen. Das Agieren der Intellektuellen wird vor dem Hintergrund des Denkens als Soziologen aufgearbeitet.
Durkheim's Ghosts is a fascinating presentation of the tradition of social theory influenced by Emile Durkheim's thinking on the social foundations of knowledge. From Saussure and Levi-Strauss to Foucault, Bourdieu and Derrida, today's criticisms of modern politics and culture owe an important, if unacknowledged, debt to Durkheim. These engaging and innovative essays by leading sociologist Charles Lemert bring together his writings on the contributions of French social theory past and present. Rather than merely interpret the theories, Lemert uses them to explore the futures of sociology, social theory, and culture studies. Durkheim's Ghosts offers the reader original insights into Durkheim's legacy and the wider French traditions for the cultural and social sciences. Of special note is the book's new and exciting theory of culture and semiotics. Provocative, scholarly, imaginative and ambitious this book will be invaluable to anyone interested in social theory, culture, and intellectual history of modern times.
Norman Birnbaum has contributed to Toward a Critical Sociology as an author.Norman Birnbaum is University Professor at Georgetown University Law School and the author of The Crisis of Industrial Society and Toward a Critical Sociology (both from OUP). A founding editor of New Left Review, he has served on the board of Partisan Review and The Nation . He lives in Washington, D.C.
Revised for the first time in over thirty years, this edition of Emile Durkheim’s masterful work on the nature and scope of sociology is updated with a new introduction and improved translation by leading scholar Steven Lukes that puts Durkheim’s work into context for the twenty-first century reader. The Rules of Sociological Method represents Emile Durkheim’s manifesto for sociology. He argues forcefully for the objective, scientific, and methodological underpinnings of sociology as a discipline and establishes guiding principles for future research. The substantial new introduction by leading Durkheim scholar Steven Lukes explains and sets into context Durkheim’s arguments. Lukes examines the still-controversial debates about The Rules of Sociological Method’s six chapters and explains their relevance to present-day sociology. The edition also includes Durkheim’s subsequent thoughts on method in the form of articles, debates with scholars from other disciplines, and letters. The original translation has been revised and reworked in order to make Durkheim’s arguments clearer and easier to read. This is an essential resource for students and scholars hoping to deepen their understanding of one of the pioneering voices in modern sociology and twentieth-century social thought.
In Sociology of Culture and of Cultural Practices, Laurent Fleury presents a synthesis of research and debate from France and the United States. He traces the development of the sociology of culture from its origins (Weber and Simmel) and examines the major trends that have emerged in this branch of sociology. Fleury also raises issues of cultural hierarchy, distinction, and legitimate culture and mass culture and focuses on new areas of research, including the role of institutions, the reception of works of art, aesthetic experience, and emancipation through art.

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