This book is the second edition of the third and last volume of a treatise on projective spaces over a finite field, also known as Galois geometries. This volume completes the trilogy comprised of plane case (first volume) and three dimensions (second volume). This revised edition includes much updating and new material. It is a mostly self-contained study of classical varieties over a finite field, related incidence structures and particular point sets in finite n-dimensional projective spaces. General Galois Geometries is suitable for PhD students and researchers in combinatorics and geometry. The separate chapters can be used for courses at postgraduate level.
This volume contains the proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Arithmetic, Geometry, Cryptography, and Coding Theory (AGCT), held at the Centre International de Rencontres Mathématiques in Marseille, France, from May 18–22, 2015. Since the first meeting almost 30 years ago, the biennial AGCT meetings have been one of the main events bringing together researchers interested in explicit aspects of arithmetic geometry and applications to coding theory and cryptography. This volume contains original research articles reflecting recent developments in the field.
This well-balanced text touches on theoretical and applied aspects of protecting digital data. The reader is provided with the basic theory and is then shown deeper fascinating detail, including the current state of the art. Readers will soon become familiar with methods of protecting digital data while it is transmitted, as well as while the data is being stored. Both basic and advanced error-correcting codes are introduced together with numerous results on their parameters and properties. The authors explain how to apply these codes to symmetric and public key cryptosystems and secret sharing. Interesting approaches based on polynomial systems solving are applied to cryptography and decoding codes. Computer algebra systems are also used to provide an understanding of how objects introduced in the book are constructed, and how their properties can be examined. This book is designed for Masters-level students studying mathematics, computer science, electrical engineering or physics.
Incidence geometry is a central part of modern mathematics that has an impressive tradition. The main topics of incidence geometry are projective and affine geometry and, in more recent times, the theory of buildings and polar spaces. Embedded into the modern view of diagram geometry, projective and affine geometry including the fundamental theorems, polar geometry including the Theorem of Buekenhout-Shult and the classification of quadratic sets are presented in this volume. Incidence geometry is developed along the lines of the fascinating work of Jacques Tits and Francis Buekenhout. The book is a clear and comprehensible introduction into a wonderful piece of mathematics. More than 200 figures make even complicated proofs accessible to the reader.
The seminal ideas of this book played a key role in the development of group theory since the 70s. Several generations of mathematicians learned geometric ideas in group theory from this book. In it, the author proves the fundamental theorem for the special cases of free groups and tree products before dealing with the proof of the general case. This new edition is ideal for graduate students and researchers in algebra, geometry and topology.
In the early years of the 1980s, while I was visiting the Institute for Ad vanced Study (lAS) at Princeton as a postdoctoral member, I got a fascinating view, studying congruence modulo a prime among elliptic modular forms, that an automorphic L-function of a given algebraic group G should have a canon ical p-adic counterpart of several variables. I immediately decided to find out the reason behind this phenomenon and to develop the theory of ordinary p-adic automorphic forms, allocating 10 to 15 years from that point, putting off the intended arithmetic study of Shimura varieties via L-functions and Eisenstein series (for which I visited lAS). Although it took more than 15 years, we now know (at least conjecturally) the exact number of variables for a given G, and it has been shown that this is a universal phenomenon valid for holomorphic automorphic forms on Shimura varieties and also for more general (nonholomorphic) cohomological automorphic forms on automorphic manifolds (in a markedly different way). When I was asked to give a series of lectures in the Automorphic Semester in the year 2000 at the Emile Borel Center (Centre Emile Borel) at the Poincare Institute in Paris, I chose to give an exposition of the theory of p-adic (ordinary) families of such automorphic forms p-adic analytically de pending on their weights, and this book is the outgrowth of the lectures given there.
This is an updated English translation of Cohomologie Galoisienne, published more than thirty years ago as one of the very first versions of Lecture Notes in Mathematics. It includes a reproduction of an influential paper by R. Steinberg, together with some new material and an expanded bibliography.
A consistent and near complete survey of the important progress made in the field over the last few years, with the main emphasis on the rigidity method and its applications. Among others, this monograph presents the most successful existence theorems known and construction methods for Galois extensions as well as solutions for embedding problems combined with a collection of the existing Galois realizations.
The featured review of the AMS describes the author’s earlier work in the field of approach spaces as, ‘A landmark in the history of general topology’. In this book, the author has expanded this study further and taken it in a new and exciting direction. The number of conceptually and technically different systems which characterize approach spaces is increased and moreover their uniform counterpart, uniform gauge spaces, is put into the picture. An extensive study of completions, both for approach spaces and for uniform gauge spaces, as well as compactifications for approach spaces is performed. A paradigm shift is created by the new concept of index analysis. Making use of the rich intrinsic quantitative information present in approach structures, a technique is developed whereby indices are defined that measure the extent to which properties hold, and theorems become inequalities involving indices; therefore vastly extending the realm of applicability of many classical results. The theory is then illustrated in such varied fields as topology, functional analysis, probability theory, hyperspace theory and domain theory. Finally a comprehensive analysis is made concerning the categorical aspects of the theory and its links with other topological categories. Index Analysis will be useful for mathematicians working in category theory, topology, probability and statistics, functional analysis, and theoretical computer science.
This exposition provides the state-of-the art on the differential geometry of hypersurfaces in real, complex, and quaternionic space forms. Special emphasis is placed on isoparametric and Dupin hypersurfaces in real space forms as well as Hopf hypersurfaces in complex space forms. The book is accessible to a reader who has completed a one-year graduate course in differential geometry. The text, including open problems and an extensive list of references, is an excellent resource for researchers in this area. Geometry of Hypersurfaces begins with the basic theory of submanifolds in real space forms. Topics include shape operators, principal curvatures and foliations, tubes and parallel hypersurfaces, curvature spheres and focal submanifolds. The focus then turns to the theory of isoparametric hypersurfaces in spheres. Important examples and classification results are given, including the construction of isoparametric hypersurfaces based on representations of Clifford algebras. An in-depth treatment of Dupin hypersurfaces follows with results that are proved in the context of Lie sphere geometry as well as those that are obtained using standard methods of submanifold theory. Next comes a thorough treatment of the theory of real hypersurfaces in complex space forms. A central focus is a complete proof of the classification of Hopf hypersurfaces with constant principal curvatures due to Kimura and Berndt. The book concludes with the basic theory of real hypersurfaces in quaternionic space forms, including statements of the major classification results and directions for further research.
Assuming only basic algebra and Galois theory, the book develops the method of "algebraic patching" to realize finite groups and, more generally, to solve finite split embedding problems over fields. The method succeeds over rational function fields of one variable over "ample fields". Among others, it leads to the solution of two central results in "Field Arithmetic": (a) The absolute Galois group of a countable Hilbertian pac field is free on countably many generators; (b) The absolute Galois group of a function field of one variable over an algebraically closed field $C$ is free of rank equal to the cardinality of $C$.
Comprehensive account of recent developments in arithmetic theory of modular forms, for graduates and researchers.
This is the first of three volumes on algebraic geometry. The second volume, Algebraic Geometry 2: Sheaves and Cohomology, is available from the AMS as Volume 197 in the Translations of Mathematical Monographs series. Early in the 20th century, algebraic geometry underwent a significant overhaul, as mathematicians, notably Zariski, introduced a much stronger emphasis on algebra and rigor into the subject. This was followed by another fundamental change in the 1960s with Grothendieck's introduction of schemes. Today, most algebraic geometers are well-versed in the language of schemes, but many newcomers are still initially hesitant about them. Ueno's book provides an inviting introduction to the theory, which should overcome any such impediment to learning this rich subject. The book begins with a description of the standard theory of algebraic varieties. Then, sheaves are introduced and studied, using as few prerequisites as possible. Once sheaf theory has been well understood, the next step is to see that an affine scheme can be defined in terms of a sheaf over the prime spectrum of a ring. By studying algebraic varieties over a field, Ueno demonstrates how the notion of schemes is necessary in algebraic geometry. This first volume gives a definition of schemes and describes some of their elementary properties. It is then possible, with only a little additional work, to discover their usefulness. Further properties of schemes will be discussed in the second volume. Ueno's book is a self-contained introduction to this important circle of ideas, assuming only a knowledge of basic notions from abstract algebra (such as prime ideals). It is suitable as a text for an introductory course on algebraic geometry.
The goal of this book is to present local class field theory from the cohomo logical point of view, following the method inaugurated by Hochschild and developed by Artin-Tate. This theory is about extensions-primarily abelian-of "local" (i.e., complete for a discrete valuation) fields with finite residue field. For example, such fields are obtained by completing an algebraic number field; that is one of the aspects of "localisation". The chapters are grouped in "parts". There are three preliminary parts: the first two on the general theory of local fields, the third on group coho mology. Local class field theory, strictly speaking, does not appear until the fourth part. Here is a more precise outline of the contents of these four parts: The first contains basic definitions and results on discrete valuation rings, Dedekind domains (which are their "globalisation") and the completion process. The prerequisite for this part is a knowledge of elementary notions of algebra and topology, which may be found for instance in Bourbaki. The second part is concerned with ramification phenomena (different, discriminant, ramification groups, Artin representation). Just as in the first part, no assumptions are made here about the residue fields. It is in this setting that the "norm" map is studied; I have expressed the results in terms of "additive polynomials" and of "multiplicative polynomials", since using the language of algebraic geometry would have led me too far astray.
This book provides a detailed and largely self-contained description of various classical and new results on solvability and unsolvability of equations in explicit form. In particular, it offers a complete exposition of the relatively new area of topological Galois theory, initiated by the author. Applications of Galois theory to solvability of algebraic equations by radicals, basics of Picard–Vessiot theory, and Liouville's results on the class of functions representable by quadratures are also discussed. A unique feature of this book is that recent results are presented in the same elementary manner as classical Galois theory, which will make the book useful and interesting to readers with varied backgrounds in mathematics, from undergraduate students to researchers. In this English-language edition, extra material has been added (Appendices A–D), the last two of which were written jointly with Yura Burda.
This volume provides an introduction to dessins d'enfants and embeddings of bipartite graphs in compact Riemann surfaces. The first part of the book presents basic material, guiding the reader through the current field of research. A key point of the second part is the interplay between the automorphism groups of dessins and their Riemann surfaces, and the action of the absolute Galois group on dessins and their algebraic curves. It concludes by showing the links between the theory of dessins and other areas of arithmetic and geometry, such as the abc conjecture, complex multiplication and Beauville surfaces. Dessins d'Enfants on Riemann Surfaces will appeal to graduate students and all mathematicians interested in maps, hypermaps, Riemann surfaces, geometric group actions, and arithmetic.
Written by leading experts in the field, this monograph provides homotopy theoretic foundations for surgery theory on higher-dimensional manifolds. Presenting classical ideas in a modern framework, the authors carefully highlight how their results relate to (and generalize) existing results in the literature. The central result of the book expresses algebraic surgery theory in terms of the geometric Hopf invariant, a construction in stable homotopy theory which captures the double points of immersions. Many illustrative examples and applications of the abstract results are included in the book, making it of wide interest to topologists. Serving as a valuable reference, this work is aimed at graduate students and researchers interested in understanding how the algebraic and geometric topology fit together in the surgery theory of manifolds. It is the only book providing such a wide-ranging historical approach to the Hopf invariant, double points and surgery theory, with many results old and new.
Function Algebras on Finite Sets gives a broad introduction to the subject, leading up to the cutting edge of research. The general concepts of the Universal Algebra are given in the first part of the book, to familiarize the reader from the very beginning on with the algebraic side of function algebras. The second part covers the following topics: Galois-connection between function algebras and relation algebras, completeness criterions, and clone theory.
This book is a collection of more than 500 attractive open problems in the field. The largely self-contained chapters provide a broad overview of discrete geometry, along with historical details and the most important partial results related to these problems.

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