Die aufregende Geschichte der Entschlüsselung des Neandertalergenoms – und das lebendige Porträt der neuen Wissenschaft der Paläogenetik In einer folgenreichen Nacht im Jahre 1996 gelang Svante Pääbo die Entschlüsselung der ersten DNA-Sequenzen eines Neandertalers. Eine Sensation! Die verblüffenden Erkenntnisse revolutionierten unser Bild von der Entwicklung des Homo sapiens. Jetzt erzählt der preisgekrönte Wissenschaftler seine persönliche Geschichte und verschränkt sie mit der Geschichte des neuen Gebiets, das er maßgeblich mitentwickelte: der Paläogenetik - von den ersten Analysen an altägyptischen Mumien bis hin zu Mammuts, Höhlenbären und Riesenfaultieren. Ein faszinierender Blick hinter die Kulissen der Spitzenforschung in Deutschland und der spannende Entwicklungsroman einer Wissenschaft, deren Ergebnisse vor wenigen Jahrzehnten noch niemand erahnen konnte
Finally, in the rapidly evolving field of genetic genealogy an up-to-date resource is here! A Genetic Genealogy Handbook: The Basics and Beyond provides genealogists with the knowledge and confidence to use DNA testing for family research. The book guides genealogists in understanding various tests and determining what DNA segments came from which ancestor. The book explains how DNA testing helps when written records stop and discusses how testing proves or disprove oral family history. Learn which tests help adoptees; understand why you resemble your relatives and how testing can connect you with cousins you never knew. Discover how to encourage potential cousins to test and learn guidelines for becoming a project administrator, genetic genealogy speaker or facilitator for your genealogical society’s DNA interest group. A Genetic Genealogy Handbook: The Basics and Beyond helps experienced and fledgling researchers become genetic genealogists able to use DNA testing to resolve genealogical roadblocks.
Discover the answers to your family history mysteries using the most-cutting edge tool available to genealogists. This plain-English guide, newly revised and expanded, is a one-stop resource on genetic genealogy for family historians. Inside, you'll learn what DNA tests are available, with up-to-date pros and cons of the major testing companies (including AncestryDNA) and advice on choosing the right test to answer your specific questions. For those who've already taken DNA tests, this guide will demystify and explain how to interpret DNA test results, including how to understand ethnicity estimates and haplogroup designations, navigate suggested cousin matches, and use third-party tools like GEDmatch to further analyze data. Inside, you'll find: Colorful diagrams and expert definitions that explain key DNA terms and concepts, such as haplogroups and DNA inheritance patterns Detailed guides to each of the major kinds of DNA tests: autosomal-DNA (atDNA), mitochondrial-DNA (mtDNA), Y-chromosomal DNA (Y-DNA), and X-chromosomal DNA (X-DNA) Tips for selecting the DNA test that can best help solve your family mysteries, with case studies showing how each test can be useful in research Information about third-party tools you can use to more thoroughly analyze your test results once you've received them Test companion guides and research forms to help you select the most appropriate DNA test and organize your results and research once you've been tested
"Genetic Genealogy in Practice covers the basic knowledge needed to apply DNA evidence to genealogical questions and then reinforces this foundation with practical applications. Each chapter ends with exercises that include real problems that researchers encounter. Answers allow complex concepts to be reviewed and mastered. As well as covering the basics of DNA testing for family history research problems, Genetic Genealogy in Practice includes discussions of ethical issues, genealogical standards, and tips on how to incorporate genetic evidence into a written conclusion. Researchers of all levels will gain a better understanding of genetic genealogy from this book."--Page [4] of cover.
Unlock the secrets in your DNA! Discover the answers to your family history mysteries using the most-cutting edge tool available. This plain-English guide is a one-stop resource for how to use DNA testing for genealogy. Inside, you'll find guidance on what DNA tests are available, plus the methodologies and pros and cons of the three major testing companies and advice on choosing the right test to answer your specific genealogy questions. And once you've taken a DNA test, this guide will demystify the often-overwhelming subject and explain how to interpret DNA test results, including how to understand ethnicity estimates and haplogroup designations, navigate suggested cousin matches, and use third-party tools like GEDmatch to further analyze your data. To give you a holistic view of genetic testing for ancestry, the book also discusses the ethics and future of genetic genealogy, as well as how adoptees and others who know little about their ancestry can especially benefit from DNA testing. The book features: Colorful diagrams and expert definitions that explain key DNA terms and concepts such as haplogroups and DNA inheritance patterns Detailed guides to each of the major kinds of DNA tests and which tests can solve which family mysteries, with case studies showing how each can be useful Information about third-party tools you can use to more thoroughly analyze your test results once you've received them Test comparison guides and research forms to help you select the most appropriate DNA test and organize your results and research once you've been tested Whether you've just heard of DNA testing or you've tested at all three major companies, this guide will give you the tools you need to unpuzzle your DNA and discover what it can tell you about your family tree.
Popular television shows, such as Finding Your Roots and Who Do You Think You Are?, have ignited a renewed passion for traditional genealogical research and thrown genetic ancestry testing into the spotlight. Once a tool only for historians and forensic scientists, DNA testing is now available directly to the consumer. Supporting the Next Generation Science Standards on heredity and inheritance of traits, this book uses simple language and detailed images and charts to explain how genetic ancestry testing is done, what it can, and cannot, reveal about a family tree, and the potential unintended consequences of being tested. Sidebars offer information about related topics, such as the Human Genome Project, mitochondrial Eve, and genetic genealogy careers.
Reconnect with your roots! Adoptees, foundlings, and others with unknown parentage face unique challenges in researching their ancestors. Enter this book: a comprehensive guide to adoption genealogy that has the resources you need to find your family through genetic testing. Inside, you'll find: Strategies for connecting your genealogy to previous genealogists Detailed guides for using DNA tests and tools, plus how to analyze your test results and apply them to research Real-life success stories that put the book's techniques into practice and inspire you to seek your own discoveries
This book consists of articles from Wikia or other free sources online. Pages: 75. Chapters: Genetic genealogy, Human haplogroups, *, 100% English, Allele, Allele frequency, Ancient DNA, Athey's Haplogroup Predictor, Augustine Warner, Cambridge Reference Sequence, Cline, Descent from Genghis Khan, DYS, Family Tree DNA, Galton-Watson process, Genealogical DNA test, Genetic drift, Genetic pollution, God's utility function, Haplotype, Human migration, Human mitochondrial DNA haplogroup, Human Y-chromosome DNA haplogroup, Hypervariable region, Identical ancestors point, Jefferson DNA data, Last universal ancestor, Lethal alleles, List of DNA tested mummies, List of DYS markers, List of genetic genealogy topics, List of genetic results derived from historical figures, Mitochondrial Eve, Modal haplotype, Most recent common ancestor, Paternal mtDNA transmission, Race and genetics, Recent single origin hypothesis, RecLOH, River out of Eden, Short tandem repeat, Single nucleotide polymorphism, Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation, Surname project, The Genographic Project, The Seven Daughters of Eve, Unique event polymorphism, Y-chromosomal Aaron, Y-chromosomal Adam, *, Human haplogroup, Cline, Models of migration to the New World, Paternal mtDNA transmission. Excerpt: In human genetics, mtDNA haplogroups and Y-DNA haplogroups are designated by letters of the alphabet. When a person takes a genealogical DNA test, the presence of an asterisk (*) in their test result indicates that they are a member of a particular haplogroup, but not of a known subclade (subdivision). Specifically, they do not possess any of the mutations that would place him/her in one of the known "downstream" subclades. For example, a member of the Y-DNA Haplogroup R may belong to the sub-haplogroup R1 (defined by marker M173) or R2 (defined by marker M124). Individuals with neither of these mutations are categorised as belonging to group R*. An allele (pronounced (US), ) is a viable DNA...
René Corneille Deboeck (1913-1985), son of Guillaume Deboeck and Joanne Nobels, married Marie Louise Girardin (1918-2001), daughter of Jean Girardin and Josephina De Maseneer. Ancestors, descendants and relatives lived mainly in Belgium. Deboeck is also spelled de Boeck and de Bock. Includes De Zutter and related families.
Genetic genealogy generates compelling questions as people around the world attempt to understand haplogroups, ethnicity, and genetic matches. DNA Q&A has curated actual questions from real people who've sought to better understand DNA via the Family History Fanatics YouTube channel, eConferences, and live presentations. Is your question, or something similar, in the book? Find out the answer to it and more! "What is the best testing companies for adoptees?" "FAMILY TREE DNA now accepts imported data from the other services. Wouldn't that make their database potentially the best overall?" "Why did I receive completely different ethnicity results when I uploaded my AncestryDNA results to GEDmatch.com and MyHeritage?" "My brother and I sent our samples into AncestryDNA recently. We have the same biological parents, but our results were significantly different. Isn't genetic testing no better than astrology?" "On 23andMe in DNA relatives, a woman is my father's half-sister. He doesn't have a half-sister. What is going on?"
Revisting Race in the Genomic Age takes a cutting-edge look at emerging genetic technologies and their impact on current conceptions of race and human identity. Essays will explore genomic science as an important anthropological and sociological case in the development of race theory as well as examine the social, ethical, and legal implications of emerging genomic technologies. Philosophers join anthropologists and scientists working in human genetic variation research to make this a truly interdisciplinary work. Following the introduction, essays in section one will present the conceptual frameworks on race as related to human genetic variation research. The heart of the book is made of up three sections focusing on three significant themes in this emerging cross-disciplinary engagement. Sections are "Race-targeted Research and Therapeutics," "Genetic Ancestry, Identity, and Group Membership," and "Race and Genetics in Public Discourse."
Do advances in genomic biology create a scientific rationale for long-discredited racial categories? Leading scholars in law, medicine, biology, sociology, history, anthropology, and psychology examine the impact of modern genetics on the concept of race. Contributors trace the interplay between genetics and race in forensic DNA databanks, the biology of intelligence, DNA ancestry markers, and racialized medicine. Each essay explores commonly held and unexamined assumptions and misperceptions about race in science and popular culture. This collection begins with the historical origins and current uses of the concept of "race" in science. It follows with an analysis of the role of race in DNA databanks and racial disparities in the criminal justice system. Essays then consider the rise of recreational genetics in the form of for-profit testing of genetic ancestry and the introduction of racialized medicine, specifically through an FDA-approved heart drug called BiDil, marketed to African American men. Concluding sections discuss the contradictions between our scientific and cultural understandings of race and the continuing significance of race in educational and criminal justice policy.

Best Books