What distinguishes differential geometry in the last half of the twentieth century from its earlier history is the use of nonlinear partial differential equations in the study of curved manifolds, submanifolds, mapping problems, and function theory on manifolds, among other topics. The differential equations appear as tools and as objects of study, with analytic and geometric advances fueling each other in the current explosion of progress in this area of geometry in the last twenty years. This book contains lecture notes of minicourses at the Regional Geometry Institute at Park City, Utah, in July 1992. Presented here are surveys of breaking developments in a number of areas of nonlinear partial differential equations in differential geometry. The authors of the articles are not only excellent expositors, but are also leaders in this field of research. All of the articles provide in-depth treatment of the topics and require few prerequisites and less background than current research articles.
"Analytic and algebraic geometers often study the same geometric structures but bring different methods to bear on them. While this dual approach has been spectacularly successful at solving problems, the language differences between algebra and analysis also represent a difficulty for students and researchers in geometry, particularly complex geometry. The PCMI program was designed to partially address this language gulf, by presenting some of the active developments in algebraic and analytic geometry in a form suitable for students on the 'other side' of the analysis-algebra language divide. One focal point of the summer school was multiplier ideals, a subject of wide current interest in both subjects. The present volume is based on a series of lectures at the PCMI summer school on analytic and algebraic geometry. The series is designed to give a high-level introduction to the advanced techniques behind some recent developments in algebraic and analytic geometry. The lectures contain many illustrative examples, detailed computations, and new perspectives on the topics presented, in order to enhance access of this material to non-specialists."--Publisher's description.
The study of 3-dimensional spaces brings together elements from several areas of mathematics. The most notable are topology and geometry, but elements of number theory and analysis also make appearances. In the past 30 years, there have been striking developments in the mathematics of 3-dimensional manifolds. This book aims to introduce undergraduate students to some of these important developments. Low-Dimensional Geometry starts at a relatively elementary level, and its early chapters can be used as a brief introduction to hyperbolic geometry. However, the ultimate goal is to describe the very recently completed geometrization program for 3-dimensional manifolds. The journey to reach this goal emphasizes examples and concrete constructions as an introduction to more general statements. This includes the tessellations associated to the process of gluing together the sides of a polygon. Bending some of these tessellations provides a natural introduction to 3-dimensional hyperbolic geometry and to the theory of kleinian groups, and it eventually leads to a discussion of the geometrization theorems for knot complements and 3-dimensional manifolds. This book is illustrated with many pictures, as the author intended to share his own enthusiasm for the beauty of some of the mathematical objects involved. However, it also emphasizes mathematical rigor and, with the exception of the most recent research breakthroughs, its constructions and statements are carefully justified.
Geometric group theory refers to the study of discrete groups using tools from topology, geometry, dynamics and analysis. The field is evolving very rapidly and the present volume provides an introduction to and overview of various topics which have played critical roles in this evolution. The book contains lecture notes from courses given at the Park City Math Institute on Geometric Group Theory. The institute consists of a set of intensive short courses offered by leaders in the field, designed to introduce students to exciting, current research in mathematics. These lectures do not duplicate standard courses available elsewhere. The courses begin at an introductory level suitable for graduate students and lead up to currently active topics of research. The articles in this volume include introductions to CAT(0) cube complexes and groups, to modern small cancellation theory, to isometry groups of general CAT(0) spaces, and a discussion of nilpotent genus in the context of mapping class groups and CAT(0) groups. One course surveys quasi-isometric rigidity, others contain an exploration of the geometry of Outer space, of actions of arithmetic groups, lectures on lattices and locally symmetric spaces, on marked length spectra and on expander graphs, Property tau and approximate groups. This book is a valuable resource for graduate students and researchers interested in geometric group theory. Titles in this series are co-published with the Institute for Advanced Study/Park City Mathematics Institute. Members of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) receive a 20% discount from list price.
A co-publication of the AMS, IAS/Park City Mathematics Institute, and Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Articles in this volume are based on lectures presented at the Park City summer school on “Mathematics and Materials” in July 2014. The central theme is a description of material behavior that is rooted in statistical mechanics. While many presentations of mathematical problems in materials science begin with continuum mechanics, this volume takes an alternate approach. All the lectures present unique pedagogical introductions to the rich variety of material behavior that emerges from the interplay of geometry and statistical mechanics. The topics include the order-disorder transition in many geometric models of materials including nonlinear elasticity, sphere packings, granular materials, liquid crystals, and the emerging field of synthetic self-assembly. Several lectures touch on discrete geometry (especially packing) and statistical mechanics. The problems discussed in this book have an immediate mathematical appeal and are of increasing importance in applications, but are not as widely known as they should be to mathematicians interested in materials science. The volume will be of interest to graduate students and researchers in analysis and partial differential equations, continuum mechanics, condensed matter physics, discrete geometry, and mathematical physics. Titles in this series are co-published with the Institute for Advanced Study/Park City Mathematics Institute. Members of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) receive a 20% discount from list price. NOTE: This discount does not apply to volumes in this series co-published with the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM).
This volume includes expanded versions of the lectures delivered in the Graduate Minicourse portion of the 2013 Park City Mathematics Institute session on Geometric Analysis. The papers give excellent high-level introductions, suitable for graduate students wishing to enter the field and experienced researchers alike, to a range of the most important areas of geometric analysis. These include: the general issue of geometric evolution, with more detailed lectures on Ricci flow and Kähler-Ricci flow, new progress on the analytic aspects of the Willmore equation as well as an introduction to the recent proof of the Willmore conjecture and new directions in min-max theory for geometric variational problems, the current state of the art regarding minimal surfaces in R3, the role of critical metrics in Riemannian geometry, and the modern perspective on the study of eigenfunctions and eigenvalues for Laplace–Beltrami operators.
Low-dimensional topology has long been a fertile area for the interaction of many different disciplines of mathematics, including differential geometry, hyperbolic geometry, combinatorics, representation theory, global analysis, classical mechanics, and theoretical physics. The Park City Mathematics Institute summer school in 2006 explored in depth the most exciting recent aspects of this interaction, aimed at a broad audience of both graduate students and researchers. The present volume is based on lectures presented at the summer school on low-dimensional topology. These notes give fresh, concise, and high-level introductions to these developments, often with new arguments not found elsewhere. The volume will be of use both to graduate students seeking to enter the field of low-dimensional topology and to senior researchers wishing to keep up with current developments. The volume begins with notes based on a special lecture by John Milnor about the history of the topology of manifolds. It also contains notes from lectures by Cameron Gordon on the basics of three-manifold topology and surgery problems, Mikhail Khovanov on his homological invariants for knots, John Etnyre on contact geometry, Ron Fintushel and Ron Stern on constructions of exotic four-manifolds, David Gabai on the hyperbolic geometry and the ending lamination theorem, Zoltan Szabo on Heegaard Floer homology for knots and three manifolds, and John Morgan on Hamilton's and Perelman's work on Ricci flow and geometrization.
Symplectic geometry has its origins as a geometric language for classical mechanics. But it has recently exploded into an independent field interconnected with many other areas of mathematics and physics. The goal of the IAS/Park City Mathematics Institute Graduate Summer School on Symplectic Geometry and Topology was to give an intensive introduction to these exciting areas of current research. Included in this proceedings are lecture notes from the following courses: Introductionto Symplectic Topology by D. McDuff; Holomorphic Curves and Dynamics in Dimension Three by H. Hofer; An Introduction to the Seiberg-Witten Equations on Symplectic Manifolds by C. Taubes; Lectures on Floer Homology by D. Salamon; A Tutorial on Quantum Cohomology by A. Givental; Euler Characteristicsand Lagrangian Intersections by R. MacPherson; Hamiltonian Group Actions and Symplectic Reduction by L. Jeffrey; and Mechanics: Symmetry and Dynamics by J. Marsden. Information for our distributors: Titles in this series are copublished with the Institute for Advanced Study/Park City Mathematics Institute. Members of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) receive a 20% discount from list price.
Designed for precollege teachers by a collaborative of teachers, educators, and mathematicians, Probability and Games is based on a course offered in the Summer School Teacher Program at the Park City Mathematics Institute. This course leads participants through an introduction to probability and statistics, with particular focus on conditional probability, hypothesis testing, and the mathematics of election analysis. These ideas are tied together through low-threshold entry points including work with real and fake coin-flipping data, short games that lead to key concepts, and inroads to connecting the topics to number theory and algebra. But this book isn't a “course” in the traditional sense. It consists of a carefully sequenced collection of problem sets designed to develop several interconnected mathematical themes. These materials provide participants with the opportunity for authentic mathematical discovery—participants build mathematical structures by investigating patterns, use reasoning to test and formalize their ideas, offer and negotiate mathematical definitions, and apply their theories and mathematical machinery to solve problems. Probability and Games is a volume of the book series “IAS/PCMI—The Teacher Program Series” published by the American Mathematical Society. Each volume in this series covers the content of one Summer School Teacher Program year and is independent of the rest.

This book presents a number of topics related to surfaces, such as Euclidean, spherical and hyperbolic geometry, the fundamental group, universal covering surfaces, Riemannian manifolds, the Gauss-Bonnet Theorem, and the Riemann mapping theorem. The main idea is to get to some interesting mathematics without too much formality. The book also includes some material only tangentially related to surfaces, such as the Cauchy Rigidity Theorem, the Dehn Dissection Theorem, and the Banach-Tarski Theorem.

The goal of the book is to present a tapestry of ideas from various areas of mathematics in a clear and rigourous yet informal and friendly way. Prerequisites include undergraduate courses in real analysis and in linear algebra, and some knowledge of complex analysis.

Designed for precollege teachers by a collaborative of teachers, educators, and mathematicians, Moving Things Around is based on a course offered in the Summer School Teacher Program at the Park City Mathematics Institute. But this book isn't a “course” in the traditional sense. It consists of a carefully sequenced collection of problem sets designed to develop several interconnected mathematical themes, and one of the goals of the problem sets is for readers to uncover these themes for themselves. The goal of Moving Things Around is to help participants make what might seem to be surprising connections among seemingly different areas: permutation groups, number theory, and expansions for rational numbers in various bases, all starting from the analysis of card shuffles. Another goal is to use these connections to bring some coherence to several ideas that run throughout school mathematics—rational number arithmetic, different representations for rational numbers, geometric transformations, and combinatorics. The theme of seeking structural similarities is developed slowly, leading, near the end of the course, to an informal treatment of isomorphism. Moving Things Around is a volume of the book series “IAS/PCMI—The Teacher Program Series” published by the American Mathematical Society. Each volume in this series covers the content of one Summer School Teacher Program year and is independent of the rest.
Designed for precollege teachers by a collaborative of teachers, educators, and mathematicians, Some Applications of Geometric Thinking is based on a course offered in the Summer School Teacher Program at the Park City Mathematics Institute. But this book isn't a “course” in the traditional sense. It consists of a carefully sequenced collection of problem sets designed to develop several interconnected mathematical themes, and one of the goals of the problem sets is for readers to uncover these themes for themselves. The goal of Some Applications of Geometric Thinking is to help teachers see that geometric ideas can be used throughout the secondary school curriculum, both as a hub that connects ideas from all parts of secondary school and beyond—algebra, number theory, arithmetic, and data analysis—and as a locus for applications of results and methods from these fields. Some Applications of Geometric Thinking is a volume of the book series “IAS/PCMI—The Teacher Program Series” published by the American Mathematical Society. Each volume in this series covers the content of one Summer School Teacher Program year and is independent of the rest. Titles in this series are co-published with the Institute for Advanced Study/Park City Mathematics Institute. Members of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) receive a 20% discount from list price.
The research topic for this IAS/PCMI Summer Session was nonlinear wave phenomena. Mathematicians from the more theoretical areas of PDEs were brought together with those involved in applications. The goal was to share ideas, knowledge, and perspectives. How waves, or ``frequencies'', interact in nonlinear phenomena has been a central issue in many of the recent developments in pure and applied analysis. It is believed that wavelet theory--with its simultaneous localization in both physical and frequency space and its lacunarity--is and will be a fundamental new tool in the treatment of the phenomena. Included in this volume are write-ups of the ``general methods and tools'' courses held by Jeff Rauch and Ingrid Daubechies. Rauch's article discusses geometric optics as an asymptotic limit of high-frequency phenomena. He shows how nonlinear effects are reflected in the asymptotic theory. In the article ``Harmonic Analysis, Wavelets and Applications'' by Daubechies and Gilbert the main structure of the wavelet theory is presented. Also included are articles on the more ``specialized'' courses that were presented, such as ``Nonlinear Schrodinger Equations'' by Jean Bourgain and ``Waves and Transport'' by George Papanicolaou and Leonid Ryzhik. Susan Friedlander provides a written version of her lecture series ``Stability and Instability of an Ideal Fluid'', given at the Mentoring Program for Women in Mathematics, a preliminary program to the Summer Session. This Summer Session brought together students, fellows, and established mathematicians from all over the globe to share ideas in a vibrant and exciting atmosphere. This book presents the compelling results.
Basic techniques for researchers interested in the field of geometric analysis.
These lectures emphasize the relation between the problem of enumerating complicated graphs and the related large deviations questions. Such questions are closely related with the asymptotic distribution of matrices.
Linear and nonlinear waves are a central part of the theory of PDEs. This book begins with a description of one-dimensional waves and their visualization through computer-aided techniques. Next, traveling waves are covered, such as solitary waves for the Klein-Gordon and KdV equations. Finally, the author gives a lucid discussion of waves arising from conservation laws, including shock and rarefaction waves. As an application, interesting models of traffic flow are used to illustrate conservation laws and wave phenomena. This book is based on a course given by the author at the IAS/Park City Mathematics Institute. It is suitable for independent study by undergraduate students in mathematics, engineering, and science programs.
The theme of the 2010 PCMI Summer School was Mathematics in Image Processing in a broad sense, including mathematical theory, analysis, computation algorithms and applications. In image processing, information needs to be processed, extracted and analyzed from visual content, such as photographs or videos. These demands include standard tasks such as compression and denoising, as well as high-level understanding and analysis, such as recognition and classification. Centered on the theme of mathematics in image processing, the summer school covered quite a wide spectrum of topics in this field. The summer school is particularly timely and exciting due to the very recent advances and developments in the mathematical theory and computational methods for sparse representation. This volume collects three self-contained lecture series. The topics are multi-resolution based wavelet frames and applications to image processing, sparse and redundant representation modeling of images and simulation of elasticity, biomechanics, and virtual surgery. Recent advances in image processing, compressed sensing and sparse representation are discussed.
Algebraic Geometry has been at the center of much of mathematics for hundreds of years. It is not an easy field to break into, despite its humble beginnings in the study of circles, ellipses, hyperbolas, and parabolas. This text consists of a series of ex
The recent introduction of the Seiberg-Witten invariants of smooth four-manifolds has revolutionized the study of those manifolds. The invariants are gauge-theoretic in nature and are close cousins of the much-studied SU(2)-invariants defined over fifteen years ago by Donaldson. On a practical level, the new invariants have proved to be more powerful and have led to a vast generalization of earlier results. This book is an introduction to the Seiberg-Witten invariants. The work begins with a review of the classical material on Spin c structures and their associated Dirac operators. Next comes a discussion of the Seiberg-Witten equations, which is set in the context of nonlinear elliptic operators on an appropriate infinite dimensional space of configurations. It is demonstrated that the space of solutions to these equations, called the Seiberg-Witten moduli space, is finite dimensional, and its dimension is then computed. In contrast to the SU(2)-case, the Seiberg-Witten moduli spaces are shown to be compact. The Seiberg-Witten invariant is then essentially the homology class in the space of configurations represented by the Seiberg-Witten moduli space. The last chapter gives a flavor for the applications of these new invariants by computing the invariants for most Kahler surfaces and then deriving some basic toological consequences for these surfaces.
Designed for precollege teachers by a collaborative of teachers, educators, and mathematicians, Probability through Algebra is based on a course offered in the Summer School Teacher Program at the Park City Mathematics Institute. But this book isn't a "course" in the traditional sense. It consists of a carefully sequenced collection of problem sets designed to develop several interconnected mathematical themes, and one of the goals of the problem sets is for readers to uncover these themes for themselves. The specific themes developed in Probability through Algebra introduce readers to the algebraic properties of expected value and variance through analysis of games, to the use of generating functions and formal algebra as combinatorial tools, and to some applications of these ideas to questions in probabilistic number theory. Probability through Algebra is a volume of the book series "IAS/PCMI-The Teacher Program Series" published by the American Mathematical Society. Each volume in that series covers the content of one Summer School Teacher Program year and is independent of the rest. Titles in this series are co-published with the Institute for Advanced Study/Park City Mathematics Institute. Members of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) receive a 20% discount from list price.

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