This volume includes expanded versions of the lectures delivered in the Graduate Minicourse portion of the 2013 Park City Mathematics Institute session on Geometric Analysis. The papers give excellent high-level introductions, suitable for graduate students wishing to enter the field and experienced researchers alike, to a range of the most important areas of geometric analysis. These include: the general issue of geometric evolution, with more detailed lectures on Ricci flow and Kähler-Ricci flow, new progress on the analytic aspects of the Willmore equation as well as an introduction to the recent proof of the Willmore conjecture and new directions in min-max theory for geometric variational problems, the current state of the art regarding minimal surfaces in R3, the role of critical metrics in Riemannian geometry, and the modern perspective on the study of eigenfunctions and eigenvalues for Laplace–Beltrami operators.
A co-publication of the AMS, IAS/Park City Mathematics Institute, and Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Articles in this volume are based on lectures presented at the Park City summer school on “Mathematics and Materials” in July 2014. The central theme is a description of material behavior that is rooted in statistical mechanics. While many presentations of mathematical problems in materials science begin with continuum mechanics, this volume takes an alternate approach. All the lectures present unique pedagogical introductions to the rich variety of material behavior that emerges from the interplay of geometry and statistical mechanics. The topics include the order-disorder transition in many geometric models of materials including nonlinear elasticity, sphere packings, granular materials, liquid crystals, and the emerging field of synthetic self-assembly. Several lectures touch on discrete geometry (especially packing) and statistical mechanics. The problems discussed in this book have an immediate mathematical appeal and are of increasing importance in applications, but are not as widely known as they should be to mathematicians interested in materials science. The volume will be of interest to graduate students and researchers in analysis and partial differential equations, continuum mechanics, condensed matter physics, discrete geometry, and mathematical physics. Titles in this series are co-published with the Institute for Advanced Study/Park City Mathematics Institute. Members of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) receive a 20% discount from list price. NOTE: This discount does not apply to volumes in this series co-published with the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM).
Symplectic geometry has its origins as a geometric language for classical mechanics. But it has recently exploded into an independent field interconnected with many other areas of mathematics and physics. The goal of the IAS/Park City Mathematics Institute Graduate Summer School on Symplectic Geometry and Topology was to give an intensive introduction to these exciting areas of current research. Included in this proceedings are lecture notes from the following courses: Introductionto Symplectic Topology by D. McDuff; Holomorphic Curves and Dynamics in Dimension Three by H. Hofer; An Introduction to the Seiberg-Witten Equations on Symplectic Manifolds by C. Taubes; Lectures on Floer Homology by D. Salamon; A Tutorial on Quantum Cohomology by A. Givental; Euler Characteristicsand Lagrangian Intersections by R. MacPherson; Hamiltonian Group Actions and Symplectic Reduction by L. Jeffrey; and Mechanics: Symmetry and Dynamics by J. Marsden. Information for our distributors: Titles in this series are copublished with the Institute for Advanced Study/Park City Mathematics Institute. Members of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) receive a 20% discount from list price.
This book addresses a new interdisciplinary area emerging on the border between various areas of mathematics, physics, chemistry, nanotechnology, and computer science. The focus here is on problems and techniques related to graphs, quantum graphs, and fractals that parallel those from differential equations, differential geometry, or geometric analysis. Also included are such diverse topics as number theory, geometric group theory, waveguide theory, quantum chaos, quantum wire systems, carbon nano-structures, metal-insulator transition, computer vision, and communication networks. This volume contains a unique collection of expert reviews on the main directions in analysis on graphs (e.g., on discrete geometric analysis, zeta-functions on graphs, recently emerging connections between the geometric group theory and fractals, quantum graphs, quantum chaos on graphs, modeling waveguide systems and modeling quantum graph systems with waveguides, control theory on graphs), as well as research articles.
This is a book written primarily for graduate students and early researchers in the fields of Analysis and Partial Differential Equations (PDEs). Coverage of the material is essentially self-contained, extensive and novel with great attention to details and rigour. The strength of the book primarily lies in its clear and detailed explanations, scope and coverage, highlighting and presenting deep and profound inter-connections between different related and seemingly unrelated disciplines within classical and modern mathematics and above all the extensive collection of examples, worked-out and hinted exercises. There are well over 700 exercises of varying level leading the reader from the basics to the most advanced levels and frontiers of research. The book can be used either for independent study or for a year-long graduate level course. In fact it has its origin in a year-long graduate course taught by the author in Oxford in 2004-5 and various parts of it in other institutions later on. A good number of distinguished researchers and faculty in mathematics worldwide have started their research career from the course that formed the basis for this book.
This is a book written primarily for graduate students and early researchers in the fields of Analysis and Partial Differential Equations (PDEs). Coverage of the material is essentially self-contained, extensive and novel with great attention to details and rigour. The strength of the book primarily lies in its clear and detailed explanations, scope and coverage, highlighting and presenting deep and profound inter-connections between different related and seemingly unrelated disciplines within classical and modern mathematics and above all the extensive collection of examples, worked-out and hinted exercises. There are well over 700 exercises of varying level leading the reader from the basics to the most advanced levels and frontiers of research. The book can be used either for independent study or for a year-long graduate level course. In fact it has its origin in a year-long graduate course taught by the author in Oxford in 2004-5 and various parts of it in other institutions later on. A good number of distinguished researchers and faculty in mathematics worldwide have started their research career from the course that formed the basis for this book.
Geometric group theory refers to the study of discrete groups using tools from topology, geometry, dynamics and analysis. The field is evolving very rapidly and the present volume provides an introduction to and overview of various topics which have played critical roles in this evolution. The book contains lecture notes from courses given at the Park City Math Institute on Geometric Group Theory. The institute consists of a set of intensive short courses offered by leaders in the field, designed to introduce students to exciting, current research in mathematics. These lectures do not duplicate standard courses available elsewhere. The courses begin at an introductory level suitable for graduate students and lead up to currently active topics of research. The articles in this volume include introductions to CAT(0) cube complexes and groups, to modern small cancellation theory, to isometry groups of general CAT(0) spaces, and a discussion of nilpotent genus in the context of mapping class groups and CAT(0) groups. One course surveys quasi-isometric rigidity, others contain an exploration of the geometry of Outer space, of actions of arithmetic groups, lectures on lattices and locally symmetric spaces, on marked length spectra and on expander graphs, Property tau and approximate groups. This book is a valuable resource for graduate students and researchers interested in geometric group theory. Titles in this series are co-published with the Institute for Advanced Study/Park City Mathematics Institute. Members of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) receive a 20% discount from list price.
This book contains lecture notes of minicourses at the Regional Geometry Institute at Park City, Utah, in July 1992. Presented here are surveys of breaking developments in a number of areas of nonlinear partial differential equations in differential geometry. The authors of the articles are not only excellent expositors, but are also leaders in this field of research. All of the articles provide in-depth treatment of the topics and require few prerequisites and less background than current research articles.
Dieses Buch ist eine leicht verständliche Einführung in die Algebra, die den historischen und konkreten Aspekt in den Vordergrund rückt. Der rote Faden ist eines der klassischen und fundamentalen Probleme der Algebra: Nachdem im 16. Jahrhundert allgemeine Lösungsformeln für Gleichungen dritten und vierten Grades gefunden wurden, schlugen entsprechende Bemühungen für Gleichungen fünften Grades fehl. Nach fast dreihundertjähriger Suche führte dies schließlich zur Begründung der so genannten Galois-Theorie: Mit ihrer Hilfe kann festgestellt werden, ob eine Gleichung mittels geschachtelter Wurzelausdrücke lösbar ist. Das Buch liefert eine gute Motivation für die moderne Galois-Theorie, die den Studierenden oft so abstrakt und schwer erscheint. In dieser Auflage wurde ein Kapitel ergänzt, in dem ein alternativer, auf Emil Artin zurückgehender Beweis des Hauptsatzes der Galois-Theorie wiedergegeben wird. Dieses Kapitel kann fast unabhängig von den anderen Kapiteln gelesen werden.
Neben den elementaren Dingen, wie Tangenten, Singularitäten und Wendepunkten werden auch schwierigere Begriffe wie lokale Zweige und Geschlecht behandelt. Höhepunkte sind die klassischen Formeln von Plücker und Clebsch, die Beziehungen zwischen verschiedenen globalen und lokalen Invarianten einer Kurve beschreiben.
Low-dimensional topology has long been a fertile area for the interaction of many different disciplines of mathematics, including differential geometry, hyperbolic geometry, combinatorics, representation theory, global analysis, classical mechanics, and theoretical physics. The Park City Mathematics Institute summer school in 2006 explored in depth the most exciting recent aspects of this interaction, aimed at a broad audience of both graduate students and researchers. The present volume is based on lectures presented at the summer school on low-dimensional topology. These notes give fresh, concise, and high-level introductions to these developments, often with new arguments not found elsewhere. The volume will be of use both to graduate students seeking to enter the field of low-dimensional topology and to senior researchers wishing to keep up with current developments. The volume begins with notes based on a special lecture by John Milnor about the history of the topology of manifolds. It also contains notes from lectures by Cameron Gordon on the basics of three-manifold topology and surgery problems, Mikhail Khovanov on his homological invariants for knots, John Etnyre on contact geometry, Ron Fintushel and Ron Stern on constructions of exotic four-manifolds, David Gabai on the hyperbolic geometry and the ending lamination theorem, Zoltan Szabo on Heegaard Floer homology for knots and three manifolds, and John Morgan on Hamilton's and Perelman's work on Ricci flow and geometrization.
The research topic for this IAS/PCMI Summer Session was nonlinear wave phenomena. Mathematicians from the more theoretical areas of PDEs were brought together with those involved in applications. The goal was to share ideas, knowledge, and perspectives. How waves, or 'frequencies', interact in nonlinear phenomena has been a central issue in many of the recent developments in pure and applied analysis. It is believed that wavelet theory - with its simultaneous localization in both physical and frequency space and its lacunarity - is and will be a fundamental new tool in the treatment of the phenomena.Included in this volume are write-ups of the 'general methods and tools' courses held by Jeff Rauch and Ingrid Daubechies. Rauch's article discusses geometric optics as an asymptotic limit of high-frequency phenomena. He shows how nonlinear effects are reflected in the asymptotic theory. In the article ""Harmonic Analysis, Wavelets and Applications"" by Daubechies and Gilbert the main structure of the wavelet theory is presented.Also included are articles on the more 'specialized' courses that were presented, such as ""Nonlinear Schrodinger Equations"" by Jean Bourgain and ""Waves and Transport"" by George Papanicolaou and Leonid Ryzhik. Susan Friedlander provides a written version of her lecture series ""Stability and Instability of an Ideal Fluid"", given at the Mentoring Program for Women in Mathematics, a preliminary program to the Summer Session. This Summer Session brought together students, fellows, and established mathematicians from all over the globe to share ideas in a vibrant and exciting atmosphere. This book presents the compelling results.
"Analytic and algebraic geometers often study the same geometric structures but bring different methods to bear on them. While this dual approach has been spectacularly successful at solving problems, the language differences between algebra and analysis also represent a difficulty for students and researchers in geometry, particularly complex geometry. The PCMI program was designed to partially address this language gulf, by presenting some of the active developments in algebraic and analytic geometry in a form suitable for students on the 'other side' of the analysis-algebra language divide. One focal point of the summer school was multiplier ideals, a subject of wide current interest in both subjects. The present volume is based on a series of lectures at the PCMI summer school on analytic and algebraic geometry. The series is designed to give a high-level introduction to the advanced techniques behind some recent developments in algebraic and analytic geometry. The lectures contain many illustrative examples, detailed computations, and new perspectives on the topics presented, in order to enhance access of this material to non-specialists."--Publisher's description.
Das Buch bietet eine Einführung in die Topologie, Differentialtopologie und Differentialgeometrie. Es basiert auf Manuskripten, die in verschiedenen Vorlesungszyklen erprobt wurden. Im ersten Kapitel werden grundlegende Begriffe und Resultate aus der mengentheoretischen Topologie bereitgestellt. Eine Ausnahme hiervon bildet der Jordansche Kurvensatz, der für Polygonzüge bewiesen wird und eine erste Idee davon vermitteln soll, welcher Art tiefere topologische Probleme sind. Im zweiten Kapitel werden Mannigfaltigkeiten und Liesche Gruppen eingeführt und an einer Reihe von Beispielen veranschaulicht. Diskutiert werden auch Tangential- und Vektorraumbündel, Differentiale, Vektorfelder und Liesche Klammern von Vektorfeldern. Weiter vertieft wird diese Diskussion im dritten Kapitel, in dem die de Rhamsche Kohomologie und das orientierte Integral eingeführt und der Brouwersche Fixpunktsatz, der Jordan-Brouwersche Zerlegungssatz und die Integralformel von Stokes bewiesen werden. Das abschließende vierte Kapitel ist den Grundlagen der Differentialgeometrie gewidmet. Entlang der Entwicklungslinien, die die Geometrie der Kurven und Untermannigfaltigkeiten in Euklidischen Räumen durchlaufen hat, werden Zusammenhänge und Krümmung, die zentralen Konzepte der Differentialgeometrie, diskutiert. Den Höhepunkt bilden die Gaussgleichungen, die Version des theorema egregium von Gauss für Untermannigfaltigkeiten beliebiger Dimension und Kodimension. Das Buch richtet sich in erster Linie an Mathematik- und Physikstudenten im zweiten und dritten Studienjahr und ist als Vorlage für ein- oder zweisemestrige Vorlesungen geeignet.
The study of 3-dimensional spaces brings together elements from several areas of mathematics. The most notable are topology and geometry, but elements of number theory and analysis also make appearances. In the past 30 years, there have been striking developments in the mathematics of 3-dimensional manifolds. This book aims to introduce undergraduate students to some of these important developments. Low-Dimensional Geometry starts at a relatively elementary level, and its early chapters can be used as a brief introduction to hyperbolic geometry. However, the ultimate goal is to describe the very recently completed geometrization program for 3-dimensional manifolds. The journey to reach this goal emphasizes examples and concrete constructions as an introduction to more general statements. This includes the tessellations associated to the process of gluing together the sides of a polygon. Bending some of these tessellations provides a natural introduction to 3-dimensional hyperbolic geometry and to the theory of kleinian groups, and it eventually leads to a discussion of the geometrization theorems for knot complements and 3-dimensional manifolds. This book is illustrated with many pictures, as the author intended to share his own enthusiasm for the beauty of some of the mathematical objects involved. However, it also emphasizes mathematical rigor and, with the exception of the most recent research breakthroughs, its constructions and statements are carefully justified.
This exploration of the interaction between probability and other areas of mathematics features a number of influential thinkers on the subject, including several Fields Medal recipients. The lectures trace recent progress in areas such as the Schramm-Loewner Evolution, random matrix theory and renormalization group theory. The lectures are motivated by principles of modern physics but have a distinctly mathematical orientation.
Das neue Lehrbuch zur Funktionentheorie, im Aufbau angelehnt an das klassische Werk von Lars Ahlfors, ist als begleitender Text für eine einsemestrige einführende Vorlesung konzipiert. Darüber hinaus behandelt der Autor aber auch einige weiterführende Themen. Der Band enthält zahlreiche Übungen sowie im Anhang drei Kapitel über den Zusammenhangsbegriff, kompakte metrische Räume und harmonische Funktionen. Besonderen Wert legt der Autor darauf, alle Beweise elegant und vollständig darzustellen. Der Band eignet sich auch für das Selbststudium.

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