This textbook introduces geometric measure theory through the notion of currents. Currents, continuous linear functionals on spaces of differential forms, are a natural language in which to formulate types of extremal problems arising in geometry, and can be used to study generalized versions of the Plateau problem and related questions in geometric analysis. Motivating key ideas with examples and figures, this book is a comprehensive introduction ideal for both self-study and for use in the classroom. The exposition demands minimal background, is self-contained and accessible, and thus is ideal for both graduate students and researchers.
This textbook introduces geometric measure theory through the notion of currents. Currents, continuous linear functionals on spaces of differential forms, are a natural language in which to formulate types of extremal problems arising in geometry, and can be used to study generalized versions of the Plateau problem and related questions in geometric analysis. Motivating key ideas with examples and figures, this book is a comprehensive introduction ideal for both self-study and for use in the classroom. The exposition demands minimal background, is self-contained and accessible, and thus is ideal for both graduate students and researchers.
``Metric geometry'' is an approach to geometry based on the notion of length on a topological space. This approach experienced a very fast development in the last few decades and penetrated into many other mathematical disciplines, such as group theory, dynamical systems, and partial differential equations. The objective of this graduate textbook is twofold: to give a detailed exposition of basic notions and techniques used in the theory of length spaces, and, more generally, to offer an elementary introduction into a broad variety of geometrical topics related to the notion of distance, including Riemannian and Carnot-Caratheodory metrics, the hyperbolic plane, distance-volume inequalities, asymptotic geometry (large scale, coarse), Gromov hyperbolic spaces, convergence of metric spaces, and Alexandrov spaces (non-positively and non-negatively curved spaces). The authors tend to work with ``easy-to-touch'' mathematical objects using ``easy-to-visualize'' methods. The authors set a challenging goal of making the core parts of the book accessible to first-year graduate students. Most new concepts and methods are introduced and illustrated using simplest cases and avoiding technicalities. The book contains many exercises, which form a vital part of the exposition.
Generalized Functions, Volume 5: Integral Geometry and Representation Theory is devoted to the theory of representations, focusing on the group of two-dimensional complex matrices of determinant one. This book emphasizes that the theory of representations is a good example of the use of algebraic and geometric methods in functional analysis, in which transformations are performed not on the points of a space, but on the functions defined on it. The topics discussed include Radon transform on a real affine space, integral transforms in the complex domain, and representations of the group of complex unimodular matrices in two dimensions. The properties of the Fourier transform on G, integral geometry in a space of constant curvature, harmonic analysis on spaces homogeneous with respect to the Lorentz Group, and invariance under translation and dilation are also described. This volume is suitable for mathematicians, specialists, and students learning integral geometry and representation theory.
In 1848 James Challis showed that smooth solutions to the compressible Euler equations can become multivalued, thus signifying the onset of a shock singularity. Today it is known that, for many hyperbolic systems, such singularities often develop. However, most shock-formation results have been proved only in one spatial dimension. Serge Alinhac's groundbreaking work on wave equations in the late 1990s was the first to treat more than one spatial dimension. In 2007, for the compressible Euler equations in vorticity-free regions, Demetrios Christodoulou remarkably sharpened Alinhac's results and gave a complete description of shock formation. In this monograph, Christodoulou's framework is extended to two classes of wave equations in three spatial dimensions. It is shown that if the nonlinear terms fail to satisfy the null condition, then for small data, shocks are the only possible singularities that can develop. Moreover, the author exhibits an open set of small data whose solutions form a shock, and he provides a sharp description of the blow-up. These results yield a sharp converse of the fundamental result of Christodoulou and Klainerman, who showed that small-data solutions are global when the null condition is satisfied. Readers who master the material will have acquired tools on the cutting edge of PDEs, fluid mechanics, hyperbolic conservation laws, wave equations, and geometric analysis.
Minimal surfaces date back to Euler and Lagrange and the beginning of the calculus of variations. Many of the techniques developed have played key roles in geometry and partial differential equations. Examples include monotonicity and tangent cone analysis originating in the regularity theory for minimal surfaces, estimates for nonlinear equations based on the maximum principle arising in Bernstein's classical work, and even Lebesgue's definition of the integral that he developed in his thesis on the Plateau problem for minimal surfaces. This book starts with the classical theory of minimal surfaces and ends up with current research topics. Of the various ways of approaching minimal surfaces (from complex analysis, PDE, or geometric measure theory), the authors have chosen to focus on the PDE aspects of the theory. The book also contains some of the applications of minimal surfaces to other fields including low dimensional topology, general relativity, and materials science. The only prerequisites needed for this book are a basic knowledge of Riemannian geometry and some familiarity with the maximum principle.
Difference equations are playing an increasingly important role in the natural sciences. Indeed many phenomena are inherently discrete and are naturally described by difference equations. Phenomena described by differential equations are therefore approximations of more basic discrete ones. Moreover, in their study it is very often necessary to resort to numerical methods. This always involves a discretization of the differential equations involved, thus replacing them by difference equations. This book shows how Lie group and integrability techniques, originally developed for differential equations, have been adapted to the case of difference ones. Each of the eleven chapters is a self-contained treatment of a topic, containing introductory material as well as the latest research results. The book will be welcomed by graduate students and researchers seeking an introduction to the field. As a survey of the current state of the art it will also serve as a valuable reference.
Highly oscillatory phenomena range across numerous areas in science and engineering and their computation represents a difficult challenge. A case in point is integrals of rapidly oscillating functions in one or more variables. The quadrature of such integrals has been historically considered very demanding. Research in the past 15 years (in which the authors played a major role) resulted in a range of very effective and affordable algorithms for highly oscillatory quadrature. This is the only monograph bringing together the new body of ideas in this area in its entirety. The starting point is that approximations need to be analyzed using asymptotic methods rather than by more standard polynomial expansions. As often happens in computational mathematics, once a phenomenon is understood from a mathematical standpoint, effective algorithms follow. As reviewed in this monograph, we now have at our disposal a number of very effective quadrature methods for highly oscillatory integrals—Filon-type and Levin-type methods, methods based on steepest descent, and complex-valued Gaussian quadrature. Their understanding calls for a fairly varied mathematical toolbox—from classical numerical analysis, approximation theory, and theory of orthogonal polynomials all the way to asymptotic analysis—yet this understanding is the cornerstone of efficient algorithms. The text is intended for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, as well as applied mathematicians, scientists, and engineers who encounter highly oscillatory integrals as a critical difficulty in their computations.
Systematically develop the concepts and tools that are vital to every mathematician, whether pure or applied, aspiring or established A comprehensive treatment with a global view of the subject, emphasizing the connections between real analysis and other branches of mathematics Included throughout are many examples and hundreds of problems, and a separate 55-page section gives hints or complete solutions for most.
An authorised reissue of the long out of print classic textbook, Advanced Calculus by the late Dr Lynn Loomis and Dr Shlomo Sternberg both of Harvard University has been a revered but hard to find textbook for the advanced calculus course for decades. This book is based on an honors course in advanced calculus that the authors gave in the 1960's. The foundational material, presented in the unstarred sections of Chapters 1 through 11, was normally covered, but different applications of this basic material were stressed from year to year, and the book therefore contains more material than was covered in any one year. It can accordingly be used (with omissions) as a text for a year's course in advanced calculus, or as a text for a three-semester introduction to analysis. The prerequisites are a good grounding in the calculus of one variable from a mathematically rigorous point of view, together with some acquaintance with linear algebra. The reader should be familiar with limit and continuity type arguments and have a certain amount of mathematical sophistication. As possible introductory texts, we mention Differential and Integral Calculus by R Courant, Calculus by T Apostol, Calculus by M Spivak, and Pure Mathematics by G Hardy. The reader should also have some experience with partial derivatives. In overall plan the book divides roughly into a first half which develops the calculus (principally the differential calculus) in the setting of normed vector spaces, and a second half which deals with the calculus of differentiable manifolds.
The implicit function theorem is part of the bedrock of mathematical analysis and geometry. Finding its genesis in eighteenth century studies of real analytic functions and mechanics, the implicit and inverse function theorems have now blossomed into powerful tools in the theories of partial differential equations, differential geometry, and geometric analysis. There are many different forms of the implicit function theorem, including (i) the classical formulation for Ck functions, (ii) formulations in other function spaces, (iii) formulations for non-smooth function, and (iv) formulations for functions with degenerate Jacobian. Particularly powerful implicit function theorems, such as the Nash–Moser theorem, have been developed for specific applications (e.g., the imbedding of Riemannian manifolds). All of these topics, and many more, are treated in the present uncorrected reprint of this classic monograph. ​ Originally published in 2002, The Implicit Function Theorem is an accessible and thorough treatment of implicit and inverse function theorems and their applications. It will be of interest to mathematicians, graduate/advanced undergraduate students, and to those who apply mathematics. The book unifies disparate ideas that have played an important role in modern mathematics. It serves to document and place in context a substantial body of mathematical ideas.​
String theory says we live in a ten-dimensional universe, but that only four are accessible to our everyday senses. According to theorists, the missing six are curled up in bizarre structures known as Calabi-Yau manifolds. In The Shape of Inner Space, Shing-Tung Yau, the man who mathematically proved that these manifolds exist, argues that not only is geometry fundamental to string theory, it is also fundamental to the very nature of our universe. Time and again, where Yau has gone, physics has followed. Now for the first time, readers will follow Yau’s penetrating thinking on where we’ve been, and where mathematics will take us next. A fascinating exploration of a world we are only just beginning to grasp, The Shape of Inner Space will change the way we consider the universe on both its grandest and smallest scales.
This book is a printed edition of the Special Issue "Differential Geometrical Theory of Statistics" that was published in Entropy
Basic Algebra and Advanced Algebra systematically develop concepts and tools in algebra that are vital to every mathematician, whether pure or applied, aspiring or established. Advanced Algebra includes chapters on modern algebra which treat various topics in commutative and noncommutative algebra and provide introductions to the theory of associative algebras, homological algebras, algebraic number theory, and algebraic geometry. Many examples and hundreds of problems are included, along with hints or complete solutions for most of the problems. Together the two books give the reader a global view of algebra and its role in mathematics as a whole.
Hansen/Mowen’s CORNERSTONES OF COST MANAGEMENT, 4E demonstrates the dynamic nature of cost accounting in today’s changing business environment. The book covers functional-based cost and control, and then activity-based cost systems, giving students the skills to manage any cost management system. Developed using extensive research on student learning behavior, this book presents concepts in a unique format that speaks to how students learn. Cornerstones examples in each chapter emphasize the How, Why, and What-Ifs of basic cost management concepts, while delving into the conceptual nature of each equation or topic. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

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