This book is a geometrical survey of the Sanskrit and Prakrt scientific and quasi-scientific literature of India, beginning with the Vedic literature and ending with the early part of the 17th century. It deals in detail with the Sulbasutras in the Vedic literature, with the mathematical parts of Jaina Canonical works and of the Hindu Siddhantas and with the contributions to geometry made by the astronomer mathematicians Aryabhata I & II, Sripati, Bhaskara I & II, Sangamagrama Madhava, Paramesvara, Nilakantha, his disciples and a host of others. The works of the mathematicians Mahavira, Sridhara and Narayana Pandita and the Bakshali Manuscript have also been studied. The work seeks to explode the theory that the Indian mathematical genius was predominantly algebraic and computational and that it eschewed proofs and rationales. There was a school in India which delighted to demonstrate even algebraical results geometrically. In their search for a sufficiently good approximation for the value of pie Indian mathematicians had discovered the tool of integration. Which they used equally effectively for finding the surface area and volume of a sphere and in other fields. This discovery of integration was the sequel of the inextricable blending of geometry and series mathematics.
Geometry Civilized is a unique combination of history and mathematics. It contains a full introduction to plane geometry and trigonometry within a fascinating historical framework that sets off the technical material. This approach to geometrical ideas gives the book its unique, readable style. The author has included a wide range of unusual and engaging geometric problems, many of which are taken from practical applications, drawn from sources ranging from ancient to modern. The study of geometry has been an important element of education in Europe since the time of the Greeks. This book helps us to understand why such emphasis has been placed on obtaining a good understanding of geometry. But the history presented here is not confined to the Western tradition. Examples drawn from other cultures, particularly Chinese and Indian, underscore the peculiarities of the geometry we have inherited from the Greeks, and thereby make Euclid's approach more accessible. Book reviews from the hardback: 'He has written a marvellous tale of how, throughout much of recorded history, geometrical thinking and civilisation have been closely intertwined. ...Definitely a book to dip into and reflect on a superior form of brainfood for the beach this summer perhaps? Heilbron's enthusiasm is contagious.' Ian Stewart, New Scientist 'The book is wonderfully illustrated. There are diagrams on almost every page, apt illustrations from older books, and well chosen photographs,together with eight colour plates. The appearance of the book is quite seductive, for which Oxford University Press should be congratulated.' Jeremy Gray, Nature 'This is a handsome book, well researched and entertainingly written. It shows how powerfully a historically informed account can communicate. If you thought Euclidean geometry was something only your great-grandparents did - try it, you will be surprised.' BJune Barrow-Green, The TIMES Higher Education Supplement
To understand modern science as a coherent story, it is essential to recognize the accomplishments of the ancient Hindus. They invented our base-ten number system and zero that are now used globally, carefully mapped the sky and assigned motion to the Earth in their astronomy, developed a sophisticated system of medicine with its mind-body approach known as Ayurveda, mastered metallurgical methods of extraction and purification of metals, including the so-called Damascus blade and the Iron Pillar of New Delhi, and developed the science of self-improvement that is popularly known as yoga. Their scientific contributions made impact on noted scholars globally: Aristotle, Megasthenes, and Apollonius of Tyana among the Greeks; Al-Birūnī, Al-Khwārizmī, Ibn Labbān, and Al-Uqlīdisī, Al-Jāḥiz among the Islamic scholars; Fa-Hien, Hiuen Tsang, and I-tsing among the Chinese; and Leonardo Fibbonacci, Pope Sylvester II, Roger Bacon, Voltaire and Copernicus from Europe. In the modern era, thinkers and scientists as diverse as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Johann Gottfried Herder, Carl Jung, Max Müller, Robert Oppenheimer, Erwin Schrödinger, Arthur Schopenhauer, and Henry David Thoreau have acknowledged their debt to ancient Hindu achievements in science, technology, and philosophy. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), one of the largest scientific organizations in the world, in 2000, published a timeline of 100 most important scientific finding in history to celebrate the new millennium. There were only two mentions from the non-Western world: (1) invention of zero and (2) the Hindu and Mayan skywatchers astronomical observations for agricultural and religious purposes. Both findings involved the works of the ancient Hindus. Ancient Hindu Science is well documented with remarkable objectivity, proper citations, and a substantial bibliography. It highlights the achievements of this remarkable civilization through painstaking research of historical and scientific sources. The style of writing is lucid and elegant, making the book easy to read. This book is the perfect text for all students and others interested in the developments of science throughout history and among the ancient Hindus, in particular.
By establishing a dialogue in which the meditative practices of Buddhism and Christianity speak to the theories of modern philosophy and science, B. Alan Wallace reveals the theoretical similarities underlying these disparate disciplines and their unified approach to making sense of the objective world. Wallace begins by exploring the relationship between Christian and Buddhist meditative practices. He outlines a sequence of meditations the reader can undertake, showing that, though Buddhism and Christianity differ in their belief systems, their methods of cognitive inquiry provide similar insight into the nature and origins of consciousness. From this convergence Wallace then connects the approaches of contemporary cognitive science, quantum mechanics, and the philosophy of the mind. He links Buddhist and Christian views to the provocative philosophical theories of Hilary Putnam, Charles Taylor, and Bas van Fraassen, and he seamlessly incorporates the work of such physicists as Anton Zeilinger, John Wheeler, and Stephen Hawking. Combining a concrete analysis of conceptions of consciousness with a guide to cultivating mindfulness and profound contemplative practice, Wallace takes the scientific and intellectual mapping of the mind in exciting new directions.
Lange bevor die Schrift entwickelt wurde, hat der Mensch geometrische Strukturen wahrgenommen und systematisch verwendet: ob beim Weben oder Flechten einfacher zweidimensionaler Muster oder beim Bauen mit dreidimensionalen Körpern. Das Buch liefert einen faszinierenden Überblick über die geometrischen Vorstellungen und Erkenntnisse der Menschheit von der Urgesellschaft bis hin zu den mathematischen und künstlerischen Ideen des 20. Jahrhunderts.
The field of geometry reflects a conglomeration of discoveries over time. Filled with detailed diagrams, this insightful volume offers serious students a comprehensive understanding of the fundamentals of geometry, including geometric shapes, axioms, and formulas. In addition, it covers some of the field's most illustrious minds, from Euclid to Wendelin Werner, figures who have helped produce the various branches of geometry as we know them today. This enlightening volume will help students understand the principles of geometry, and also the fascinating story behind the numbers.
The present volume provides a fascinating overview of geometrical ideas and perceptions from the earliest cultures to the mathematical and artistic concepts of the 20th century. It is the English translation of the 3rd edition of the well-received German book “5000 Jahre Geometrie,” in which geometry is presented as a chain of developments in cultural history and their interaction with architecture, the visual arts, philosophy, science and engineering. Geometry originated in the ancient cultures along the Indus and Nile Rivers and in Mesopotamia, experiencing its first “Golden Age” in Ancient Greece. Inspired by the Greek mathematics, a new germ of geometry blossomed in the Islamic civilizations. Through the Oriental influence on Spain, this knowledge later spread to Western Europe. Here, as part of the medieval Quadrivium, the understanding of geometry was deepened, leading to a revival during the Renaissance. Together with parallel achievements in India, China, Japan and the ancient American cultures, the European approaches formed the ideas and branches of geometry we know in the modern age: coordinate methods, analytical geometry, descriptive and projective geometry in the 17th an 18th centuries, axiom systems, geometry as a theory with multiple structures and geometry in computer sciences in the 19th and 20th centuries. Each chapter of the book starts with a table of key historical and cultural dates and ends with a summary of essential contents of geometr y in the respective era. Compelling examples invite the reader to further explore the problems of geometry in ancient and modern times. The book will appeal to mathematicians interested in Geometry and to all readers with an interest in cultural history. From letters to the authors for the German language edition I hope it gets a translation, as there is no comparable work. Prof. J. Grattan-Guinness (Middlesex University London) "Five Thousand Years of Geometry" - I think it is the most handsome book I have ever seen from Springer and the inclusion of so many color plates really improves its appearance dramatically! Prof. J.W. Dauben (City University of New York) An excellent book in every respect. The authors have successfully combined the history of geometry with the general development of culture and history. ... The graphic design is also excellent. Prof. Z. Nádenik (Czech Technical University in Prague)
Philosophen und Mathematiker hat das Nachsinnen über das Wesen des Unendlichen buchstäblich den Verstand geraubt – und dennoch ist es ein Konzept, das immer wieder unser Leben bestimmt. In diesem mit Anekdoten und Geschichten gespickten Buch nimmt uns Brian Clegg mit auf eine Reise durch das Grenzland zwischen dem extrem Großen und dem Ultimativen, von Archimedes, der die Zahl der Sandkörner bestimmte, die das Universum füllen würden, bis zu den neuesten Theorien über die physikalische Realität des Unendlichen.
The updated new edition of the classic and comprehensive guide to the history of mathematics For more than forty years, A History of Mathematics has been the reference of choice for those looking to learn about the fascinating history of humankind’s relationship with numbers, shapes, and patterns. This revised edition features up-to-date coverage of topics such as Fermat’s Last Theorem and the Poincaré Conjecture, in addition to recent advances in areas such as finite group theory and computer-aided proofs. Distills thousands of years of mathematics into a single, approachable volume Covers mathematical discoveries, concepts, and thinkers, from Ancient Egypt to the present Includes up-to-date references and an extensive chronological table of mathematical and general historical developments. Whether you're interested in the age of Plato and Aristotle or Poincaré and Hilbert, whether you want to know more about the Pythagorean theorem or the golden mean, A History of Mathematics is an essential reference that will help you explore the incredible history of mathematics and the men and women who created it.
Facts101 is your complete guide to A History of Mathematics. In this book, you will learn topics such as Euclid, Archimedes and Apollonius, Mathematical Methods in Hellenistic Times, and The Final Chapter s of Greek Mathematics plus much more. With key features such as key terms, people and places, Facts101 gives you all the information you need to prepare for your next exam. Our practice tests are specific to the textbook and we have designed tools to make the most of your limited study time.
The fifth installment of a projected Census of the Exact Sciences in Sanskrit,Ó which will provide all available bibliographical info. concerning works in Jyotihsastra & related fields & biographical info. concerning their authors. Jyotihsastra is traditionally divided into 3 skandhas or branches: hora or genethlialogy & other forms of horoscopic astrology, ganita or math. & mathematical astronomy, & samhita or divination. This vol. contains entries on authors whose names being with the Sanskrit semivowels (y, r, l, & v). This material is preceded by additional abbrev. of journals, additional biblio., & additional manuscript catalogs, as well as entries supplemental to those in vols. I-IV of Series A. No new material after Spring of 1992.
What is algebra? For some, it is an abstract language of x's and y’s. For mathematics majors and professional mathematicians, it is a world of axiomatically defined constructs like groups, rings, and fields. Taming the Unknown considers how these two seemingly different types of algebra evolved and how they relate. Victor Katz and Karen Parshall explore the history of algebra, from its roots in the ancient civilizations of Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, China, and India, through its development in the medieval Islamic world and medieval and early modern Europe, to its modern form in the early twentieth century. Defining algebra originally as a collection of techniques for determining unknowns, the authors trace the development of these techniques from geometric beginnings in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia and classical Greece. They show how similar problems were tackled in Alexandrian Greece, in China, and in India, then look at how medieval Islamic scholars shifted to an algorithmic stage, which was further developed by medieval and early modern European mathematicians. With the introduction of a flexible and operative symbolism in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, algebra entered into a dynamic period characterized by the analytic geometry that could evaluate curves represented by equations in two variables, thereby solving problems in the physics of motion. This new symbolism freed mathematicians to study equations of degrees higher than two and three, ultimately leading to the present abstract era. Taming the Unknown follows algebra’s remarkable growth through different epochs around the globe.
two main (interacting) ways. They constitute that with which exploration into problems or questions is carried out. But they also constitute that which is exchanged between scholars or, in other terms, that which is shaped by one (or by some) for use by others. In these various dimensions, texts obviously depend on the means and technologies available for producing, reproducing, using and organizing writings. In this regard, the contribution of a history of text is essential in helping us approach the various historical contexts from which our sources originate. However, there is more to it. While shaping texts as texts, the practitioners of the sciences may create new textual resources that intimately relate to the research carried on. One may think, for instance, of the process of introduction of formulas in mathematical texts. This aspect opens up a wholerangeofextremelyinterestingquestionstowhichwewillreturnatalaterpoint.But practitioners of the sciences also rely on texts produced by themselves or others, which they bring into play in various ways. More generally, they make use of textual resources of every kind that is available to them, reshaping them, restricting, or enlarging them. Among these, one can think of ways of naming, syntax of statements or grammatical analysis, literary techniques, modes of shaping texts or parts of text, genres of text and so on.Inthissense,thepractitionersdependon,anddrawon,the“textualcultures”available to the social and professional groups to which they belong.
Die Mathematik im mittelalterlichen Islam hatte großen Einfluss auf die allgemeine Entwicklung des Faches. Der Autor beschreibt diese Periode der Geschichte der Mathematik und bezieht sich dabei auf die arabischsprachigen Quellen. Zu den behandelten Themen gehören Dezimalrechnen, Geometrie, ebene und sphärische Trigonometrie, Algebra sowie die Approximation von Wurzeln von Gleichungen. Das Buch wendet sich an Mathematikhistoriker und -studenten, aber auch an alle Interessierten mit Mathematikkenntnissen der weiterführenden Schule.

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