Taking his inspiration from a 16th century French manual on etiquette, young George Washington compiled his own set of instructions under the title, The Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior. These concise rules to live by have been studied and copied by millions of readers eager to absorb Washington’s secrets of success in life and work. Neither unduly severe nor sentimental, the rules have stood the test of time and still reverberate today.
Every American is taught a pristine narrative of the life and legacy of George Washington and can easily recite the highlights of the "Father of Our Country". The remarkable Virginian led an under-resourced, rag-tag army to ultimate victory in the American Revolution before becoming the nation's first president, setting it on its path toward superpower status. He may not have actually chopped down a cherry tree or tossed a silver dollar across the Potomac, but his contemporaries considered his character above reproach. When Washington voluntary resigned as commander of the armies, he stunned the world. Everyone in the colonies and the world realized that Washington, at the head of the last army standing in the colonies, could have made himself king of the new United States on the spot, and it would have been a move supported by his rank and file soldiers. Instead, Washington became the first Westerner to voluntarily demobilize his army, ensuring civilian control of the new nation. King George III called Washington "the greatest character of the age" for making that decision. As President from 1788-1796, Washington set every precedent for the executive branch of the new government, from forming a "Cabinet" to limiting himself to two terms. He even set precedents with his farewell address, which helped guide the policies of subsequent administrations.
Copied out by hand as a young man aspiring to the status of Gentleman, the 110 precepts which make up this work were based on a set of rules composed by French Jesuits in 1595. The first English edition of these rules was available in Francis Hawkins' Youths Behavior, or Decency in Conversation Amongst Men, which appeared in 1640, and it is from this work that George Washington seems to have copied. However much he may have simplified them, these precepts had a strong influence on Washington, who aimed to always live by them. The rules focus on self-respect and respect for others through details of etiquette and offer pointers on such issues as how to dress, walk, eat in public, and address one's superiors.
Among the manuscript books of George Washington, preserved in the State Archives at Washington City, the earliest bears the date, written in it by himself, 1745. Washington was born February 11, 1731 O. S., so that while writing in this book he was either near the close of his fourteenth, or in his fifteenth, year. It is entitled "Forms of Writing", has thirty folio pages, and the contents, all in his boyish handwriting, are sufficiently curious. Amid copied forms of exchange, bonds, receipts, sales, and similar exercises, occasionally, in ornate penmanship, there are poetic selections, among them lines of a religious tone on "True Happiness". But the great interest of the book centres in the pages headed : "Rules of Civility and Decent Behaviour in Company and Conversation". The book had been gnawed at the bottom by Mount Vernon mice, before it reached the State Archives, and nine of the 110 Rules have thus suffered, the sense of several being lost...
It were a noble task for any competent hand to adapt the Rules given in this volume, and those of the later French work, and still more those of Master Obadiah Walker's book on -Education,- to the conditions and ideas of our time, for the use of schools. From the last-named work, that of a Master of University College, Oxford, I will take for my conclusion a pregnant passage. -The greatest Magnetismes in the World are Civility, Conforming to the innocent humours, and infirmities, sometimes, of others, readiness to do courtesies for all, Speaking well of all behind their backs. And sly Affability, which is not only to be used in common and unconcerning speech, but upon all occasions. A man may deny a request, chide, reprehend, command &c. affably, with good words, nor is there anything so harsh which may not be inoffensively represented.
A chance encounter with a handsome banker in a Greenwich Village jazz bar on New Year's Eve 1938 catapults witty Wall Street secretary Katey Kontent into the upper echelons of New York society, where she befriends a shy multi-millionaire, an Upper East Side ne'er-do-well and a single-minded widow. A first novel. Reprint.
This classic essay on the responsibilities of a doctor was first published in New York in 1769. It remains a perfect gift for a young doctor just starting out or for one who is older and wiser. This classic will be an inspiration to any who read its timeless message.
In 1840 Mann wrote On the Art of Teaching. Its message has lived on as a timeless and inspiring appeal to teachers.
A selection of the first President's writings follows his life from an entry in his journal written as a teenager to his last diary entry written the day before he died, showing a man who was dedicated to his family, friends, home, and the country he helped shape.
A guide to personal and professional empowerment through civility and social skills, written by two White House Social Secretaries who offer an important fundamental message—everyone is important and everyone deserves to be treated well. Former White House social secretaries Lea Berman, who worked for George and Laura Bush, and Jeremy Bernard, who worked for Michelle and Barack Obama, have written an entertaining and uniquely practical guide to personal and professional success in modern life. Their daily experiences at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue taught them valuable lessons about how to work productively with people from different walks of life and points of view. These Washington insiders share what they’ve learned through first person examples of their own glamorous (and sometimes harrowing) moments with celebrities, foreign leaders and that most unpredictable of animals—the American politician. This book is for you if you feel unsure of yourself in social settings, if you’d like to get along more easily with others, or if you want to break through to a new level of cooperation with your boss and coworkers. They give specific advice for how to exude confidence even when you don’t feel it, ways to establish your reputation as an individual whom people like, trust, and want to help, and lay out the specific social skills still essential to success - despite our increasingly digitized world. Jeremy and Lea prove that social skills are learned behavior that anyone can acquire, and tell the stories of their own unlikely paths to becoming the social arbiters of the White House, while providing tantalizing insights into the character of the first ladies and presidents they served. This is not a book about old school etiquette; they explain the things we all want to know, like how to walk into a roomful of strangers and make friends, what to do about a difficult colleague who makes you dread coming to work each day, and how to navigate the sometimes-treacherous waters of social media in a special chapter on “Virtual Manners.” For lovers of White House history, this is a treasure of never-before-published anecdotes from the authors and their fellow former social secretaries as they describe pearl-clutching moments with presidents and first ladies dating back to the Johnson administration. The authors make a case for the importance of a return to treating people well in American political life, maintaining that democracy cannot be sustained without public civility. Foreword by Laura Bush
Unabridged version of "Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation," by George Washington, offered here for chump change. Copied out by hand, Washington's "Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation," were maxims by which proper people should be influenced. Included here are copies of Washington's original pages, and translations of the rule. Read from his young hand. Ponder the rules of revolutionary American culture. Apply some to your life. Table of Contents History of Washington and the 110 Rules 3 Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation 6 Image of rules 1-12 9 Image of rules 13-24 14 Image of rules 25-31 18 Image of rules 32-42 22 Image of rules 43-53 26 Image of rules 54-63 30 Image of rules 64-75 34 Image of rules 76-87 38 Image of rules 88-103 42
History of George Washington's journals.
A revisionist biography of George Washington chronicles his quarter-century career in public life, from his heroic deeds as a leader through the legacy that has been passed down to his political descendants
Presents 110 quotations about civility and behavior that George Washington copied when he was fourteen years old and attempted to live by.
From 1771 to his death in 1790, Benjamin Franklin was in the process of writing what he referred to as his Memoirs. Portions of the unfinished work were published posthumously as Memoirs of the Private Life of Benjamin Franklin, first in French in 1791, and then in English in 1793. Today the complete unfinished manuscript is known as The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, and is considered one of the most famous and influential examples of autobiography ever written. In the heart of the work, Franklin wrote of his "bold and arduous Project of arriving at Perfection" when he was a young man. He prepared a list of thirteen virtues he wished to perfect in himself, and created a chart in which to keep track of his shortcomings. Among Franklin's list of virtues were personal traits (frugality, moderation, tranquility) and social traits (sincerity, justice, humility). Franklin strayed from the virtuous path on many occasions, and discovered perfection was an impossible thing to achieve, but felt a better man for the effort. Applewood Books now offers Benjamin Franklin's Book of Virtues as Franklin intended it - a beautiful little hardcover, complete with the list of thirteen virtues and a chart to monitor one's own progress.
The newest addition to Applewood's "Books of American Wisdom" series is this handsome guide to the American flag, a concise collection of the history and etiquette of the U.S. flag. The book, bound in hardcover in a distinctive blue leatherette with gold stamping, includes details of the laws relating to the U.S. flag , as described in the United States Code; information about the Pledge of Allegiance and Flag Day; a guide to flag presentation and care; and a timeline of flags, noting the date each state was added to the union. It makes the perfect gift for anyone who cherishes the flag and the republic for which it stands.
"In Faith of Our Founding Father, author Janice T. Connell examines the spiritual life of our first president. She takes us on a journey from his boyhood, scarred by the early death of his father, to the pinnacle of the Presidency." "Washington was no stranger to sorrow, cold, hunger, persecution, violence or terrorism. His great accomplishment was to face misfortune and conquer it. He achieved his victory by discipline, commitment, prayer, and the graced ability to bend his will under the yoke of Divine Providence. Faith of Our Founding Father contains the entire text of the Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation, a text he learned by heart as a young schoolboy and which governed his code of behavior throughout his life. It also contains the full text of his daily prayers, which provided him solace and enriched his faith until the day he died."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
George Washington wrote an astonishing number of letters, both personal and professional. The majority—about 140,000 documents—are from his years as commander in chief during the Revolutionary War, from 1775 to 1783. This Glorious Struggle presents a selection of Washington's most important and interesting letters from that time, including many that have never been published. Washington's lively and often surprisingly candid notes to his wife and family, friends, Congress, fellow soldiers—and even the enemy—chronicle his most critical tactical and strategic decisions, while offering a rare glimpse of the extremes of depression and exultation into which he was cast by the fortunes of war. The letters are arranged chronologically and give a dramatic sense of the major phases of the war, from Boston, Trenton, and Valley Forge, to Monmouth and Yorktown. The more personal missives show us a Washington who worried about his wife's well-being and who appreciated a good joke and a well-laid table, not to mention the company of the ladies. This Glorious Struggle brings Washington to vivid life, offering a fresh and intimate sense of this most towering American figure and the critical role he played in the creation of our country.

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