In The Naked Heart, Peter Gay explores the bourgeoisie's turn inward. At the very time that industrialists, inventors, statesmen, and natural scientists were conquering new objective worlds, Gay writes, "the secret life of the self had grown into a favorite and wholly serious indoor sport." Following the middle class's preoccupation with inwardness through its varied cultural expressions (such as fiction, art, history, and autobiography), Gay turns also to the letters and confessional diaries of both obscure and prominent men and women. These revealing documents help to round out a sparkling portrait of an age.
Unterhaltungstheater, Tanz, Populärmusik, Vergnügungspark oder Drogenkonsum: Berlins ausschweifende Vergnügungskultur zwischen 1880 und 1930.
Critics often comment on the importance of landscape in Wuthering Heights, and in this edition, Christopher Heywood locates the text more precisely than previous editions amid Yorkshire’s limestone north and moorland south, drawing out the importance of the region’s slaveholding society. Heywood also makes an important contribution to scholarship arguing persuasively for a re-structuring of the chapter and section breaks. Finally, this edition includes a variety of appendices that help to illuminate the novel’s historical background.
Classical political economy rests on the assumption that the market and the family are overlapping and mutually dependent realms, dominated in turn by economic men and domestic women. Here, Brian Cooper explores the role of economic theory in 'normalizing' the family in the first half of the nineteenth century. Drawing on a wide range of sources - novels, books on etiquette and statistical sources, as well as works of economics - the book examines the impacts of these different forms on contemporary debate and will be of interest to historians of economic thought, feminist economics and those interested in rhetoric and economics.
Storm Jameson writes of Stendhal "as one speaks in suitable company of a friend". She knew him very well. Over the years she read everything available by him and she immersed herself in his life and his writings - and the two cannot be separated. As a biographical subject, Stendhal is vastly more rewarding than many literary figures. Something was forever happening to him; usually another passionate love affair. Life at home, in his youth, was a smouldering battle-ground: he hated his father, and when he rejoiced at the execution of Louis XVI, "be sure", Storm Jameson adds, "that another head glimmered in his mind." There was his naively close relationship with his sister Pauline, whom however he later outgrew, so that "he would do anything he could for her except live with her." There was his brief but horrifying experience of Napoleon's wars. And of course, there was his passion for travel, for society, for the opera, for Italy. It all became part of the texture of his books. What is so astonishing is that his contemporaries were unconscious of his genius: even his old friend Merimee patronised him as a failure. Posterity has set that right, and this study, so lucidly and perceptively written, and providing so many insights, gives a marvellously concise picture of a rich and varied life.
The twenty-ninth volume of the Centenary Edition of Carlyle's collected works, first published in 1896.
Das Goethe-Buch für unsere Zeit: Rüdiger Safranski nähert sich dem letzten Universalgenie aus den primären Quellen – Werke, Briefe, Tagebücher, Gespräche, Aufzeichnungen von Zeitgenossen. So wird Goethe ungewohnt lebendig: Ein junger Mann aus gutem Hause, dem Studentenleben zugetan und dauerverliebt, wird Bestsellerautor, bekommt eine gutdotierte Stellung, dilettiert in Naturforschungen, flüchtet nach Italien, lebt in wilder Ehe – und bei alledem schreibt er seine unvergesslichen Werke. Doch er wollte noch mehr: Das Leben selbst sollte zum Kunstwerk werden. Safranskis souverän geschriebenes Buch macht uns zu Zeitgenossen dieses Menschen und schildert eindringlich, wie Goethe sich zu Goethe gemacht hat.
Chosen by author Elizabeth Gilbert as one of her ten favorite books, Daniel Ladinsky’s extraordinary renderings of 250 unforgettable lyrical poems by Hafiz, one of the greatest Sufi poets of all time More than any other Persian poet—even Rumi—Hafiz expanded the mystical, healing dimensions of poetry. Because his poems were often ecstatic love songs from God to his beloved world, many have called Hafiz the "Invisible Tongue." Indeed, Daniel Ladinsky has said that his work with Hafiz is an attempt to do the impossible: to render Light into words—to make the Luminous Resonance of God tangible to our finite senses. I am a hole in a flute that the Christ's breath moves through— listen to this music! With this stunning collection of Hafiz's most intimate poems, Ladinsky has succeeded brilliantly in presenting the essence of one of Islam's greatest poetic and religious voices. Each line of The Gift imparts the wonderful qualities of this master Sufi poet and spiritual teacher: encouragement, an audacious love that touches lives, profound knowledge, generosity, and a sweet, playful genius unparalleled in world literature.

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