A small egg appears to obey commands, until the cracking of the shell and a cheeping sound explain how it is possible, in a text with pull-tabs and a pop-up illustration.
In the tradition of the acclaimed graphic memoirs Fun Home and Persepolis, Phoebe Potts’s Good Eggs is a funny, insightful, and deeply moving book about learning to appreciate what we have...even when we can’t seem to get what we want. In Good Eggs, Phoebe’s quest to conceive a baby forces her to come to terms with her lapsed Judaism, her aspirations as an artist, her neurotic family, and her depression—happily, all with the support of her true loving husband. Potts’s clever, charming, and wonderfully detailed graphic novel evokes the intimacy of Alison Bechdel and the humor of New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast.
'Suzy Becker is a wonderful writer, hilarious, touching, and sweet.' - Anne Lamott, author of Help, Thanks, Wow and Operating Instructions
An egg is the simplest and most versatile of ingredients. Nutritious, rich in protein, low in fat, perfect for a quick brunch, essential for baking and key to so many starters, main courses and puddings, there is something magical about the humble egg. Eggs are cheap and available to us all – particularly to those who keep chickens. Inspired to find the most imaginative ways to make the best use of her hens’ steady supply, and at the same time use as much fruit and vegetables from her garden as possible, Genevieve Taylor has created a year’s worth of recipes that are shaped by the changing seasons and are spontaneous, unfussy and joyful. Her passion for food that tastes and looks gorgeous, whether for every day or for parties, shines through each and every recipe and photograph in this wonderfully handy book. Move over omelette and custard, here are tortillas and tarts, pasta and pies, sauces and ice-creams, curries and clafouti and a couple of cakes for every month of the year.
From the bestselling creators of The Bad Seed, a timely story about not having to be Grade A perfect! Meet the good egg. He’s a verrrrrry good egg indeed. But trying to be so good is hard when everyone else is plain ol’ rotten. As the other eggs in the dozen behave badly, the good egg starts to crack from all the pressure of feeling like he has to be perfect. So, he decides enough is enough! It’s time for him to make a change… Dynamic duo Jory John and Pete Oswald hatch a funny and charming story that reminds us of the importance of balance, self-care, and accepting those who we love (even if they are sometimes a bit rotten). Perfect for reading aloud and shared story time!
Responsible Meg has always taken care of her bipolar younger brother Matt. But when she decides to get pregnant - and have her embryos screened for bipolar disorder - is she taking the idea of "being responsible" too far? A funny and surprising play about bioethics, siblings, and the limits of unconditional love. ..". Instead of slipping into pedantic debate, the play successfully broaches these topics through subtle theatrical devices ... [GOOD EGG] has a powerful message that addresses important social themes that need much attention." -The Happiest Medium "In a heated moment, Matt says to Meg that ' ... when you have everything you want, sometimes you don't like anything you get.' Those words are powerful in a myriad of ways, all pointing to the value of restraint. Just because you have the power and every reason to do something, that doesn't mean you should. [the play] hits this sentiment right on the nose." -Stage and Cinema ..". a brilliant monologue that Fortenberry nails [is] the playwright's attempt to share not only the human side of bipolar disorder, but also the scientific realities and questions about the illness ... Fortenberry tells her story through the clever technique of juxtaposition and foil, which helps the audience feel both sympathy and repulsion for the chaotic but artistically passionate Matt as well as the dependable but perfectionistic Meg." -Not As Crazy As You Think "GOOD EGG thus effectively lays out the moral dilemmas involved in choosing whether or not to screen for hereditary disorders and diseases, as well as believably presenting a bipolar character who has a chance to describe the internal processes of the brain during high and low points ... The science-driven arguments are refreshingly poignant ... Particularly captivating is Matt's monologue about his [bipolar] disorder." -Theatre Is Easy "Playwright Dorothy Fortenberry doesn't try to teach us a lesson here. Is Matt's illness an inner demon? From the perspective of those who must live with him - of Meg - of course, it appears that way. But, as he says later on, 'Maybe I don't want to be sane. Maybe sane is overrated.'" -BlogCritic
Cracking good yolks to have you beating a path to the book shop. Egg-cellant puns to scramble your brains. Basically, it's eggs-actly what you need to become an eggstraordinarily eggs-pert joker!
A collection of more than two hundred egg recipes re-introduces the joys of this basic food, restoring such favorites as eggnog, lemon chiffon tort, and popovers--as well as omelettes, frittatas, breads, stuffed eggs, pasta, quiche, souffles, custards, meringues, cookies, pies, and tarts--to the American kitchen. Reprint.
Welcome to Miss Qiunzella Thiskwin Penniquiqul Thistle Crumpet’s Camp for Hardcore Lady Types. The five scouts of Roanoke cabin—Jo, April, Molly, Mal, and Ripley—love their summers at camp. They get to hang out with their best friends, earn Lumberjane scout badges, annoy their no-nonsense counselor Jen . . . and go on supernatural adventures. That last one? A pretty normal occurrence at Miss Qiunzella’s, where the woods contain endless mysteries. Book three shines the spotlight on Ripley, the smallest, youngest, most animal-loving member of the cabin. When Ripley comes across an abandoned egg, she’s determined to take care of it until the parent comes back. Unfortunately, her plan is quickly foiled by egg poachers, who steal the egg for their own collection.
Not all the foods in the refrigerator get along like peas in a pod. The vegetables are steamed, and Bad Apple and Second Banana are the problem. Good Egg suggests his friends try different responses to these two bullies. They try hiding, then standing their ground. At first, Good Egg's tactics don't bear fruit. Only by using his noodle does Good Egg avoid getting scrambled and save his friends' bacon. In this story told on two levels, young readers will be entertained by the hijinks of the anthropomorphic food characters and will appreciate the allegory about not letting one bad apple spoil the bunch. Adult readers are served plenty of food for thought with hilarious gastronomical idioms and puns. An author's note explaining all the wordplay adds English language educational opportunities.
Whether you are trying to conceive naturally or through IVF, the quality of your eggs will have a powerful impact on how long it takes you to get pregnant and whether you face an increased risk of miscarriage. Poor egg quality is emerging as the single most important cause of age-related infertility, recurrent miscarriage, and failed IVF cycles. It is also a major contributor to infertility in PCOS. Based on a comprehensive investigation of a vast array of scientific research, It Starts with the Egg reveals a groundbreaking new approach for improving egg quality and fertility. With a concrete strategy that includes minimizing exposure to toxins such as BPA and phthalates, choosing the right vitamins and supplements to safeguard developing eggs, and harnessing nutritional advice shown to boost IVF success rates, this book offers practical solutions that will help you get pregnant faster and deliver a healthy baby. "This timely synthesis of scientific literature is essential reading for both women and men wanting practical, evidence-based recommendations to enhance their fertility." - Dr. Loretta McKinnon, Epidemiologist, Princess Alexandra Hospital. "A thoroughly-researched and eye-opening account of how small, simple lifestyle changes can have powerful, positive effects on your health and fertility. A must-read for women wanting the best chance of conceiving a healthy baby." - Beth Greer, bestselling author of Super Natural Home
Jessica the frog befriends the animal that hatches from an egg she brought home, thinking it is a chicken.
"Forward's book is a knockout. In science fiction there is only a handful of books that stretch the mind--and this is one of them"--Arthur C. Clarke From the Paperback edition.
From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler meets Chasing Vermeer in this clever middle grade debut When Theodora Tenpenny spills a bottle of rubbing alcohol on her late grandfather’s painting, she discovers what seems to be an old Renaissance masterpiece underneath. That’s great news for Theo, who’s struggling to hang onto her family’s two-hundred-year-old townhouse and support her unstable mother on her grandfather’s legacy of $463. There’s just one problem: Theo’s grandfather was a security guard at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and she worries the painting may be stolen. With the help of some unusual new friends, Theo's search for answers takes her all around Manhattan, and introduces her to a side of the city—and her grandfather—that she never knew. To solve the mystery, she'll have to abandon her hard-won self-reliance and build a community, one serendipitous friendship at a time.
In this innovative cookbook, James Beard award-winning author Michael Ruhlman explains why the egg is the key to the craft of cooking. For culinary visionary Michael Ruhlman, the question is not whether the chicken or the egg came first, it's how anything could be accomplished in the kitchen without the magic of the common egg. He starts with perfect poached and scrambled eggs and builds up to brioche and Italian meringue. Along the way readers learn to make their own mayonnaise, pasta, custards, quiches, cakes, and other preparations that rely fundamentally on the hidden powers of the egg. A unique framework for the book is provided in Ruhlman's egg flowchart, which starts with the whole egg at the top and branches out to describe its many uses and preparations -- boiled, pressure-cooked, poached, fried, coddled, separated, worked into batters and doughs, and more. A removable illustrated flowchart is included with the book. Nearly 100 recipes are grouped by technique and range from simple (Egg Salad with Tarragon and Chives) to sophisticated (nougat). Dozens of step-by-step photographs guide the home cook through this remarkable culinary journey.
Fried, scrambled, poached, or baked, eggs are one of the most essential and esteemed ingredients in the kitchen, In these pages you'll find more than 40 recipes from scrambles to stratas and everything in between.
In this unique cookbook, two chefs from the Zuni Cafe in San Francisco share their wonderful egg creations, from eggs baked in braised-mashed potatoes to caviar and scrambled eggs.
Elena Rudina lives in the impoverished Russian countryside. Her father has been dead for years. One of her brothers has been conscripted into the Tsar's army, the other taken as a servant in the house of the local landowner. Her mother is dying, slowly, in their tiny cabin. And there is no food. But then a train arrives in the village, a train carrying untold wealth, a cornucopia of food, and a noble family destined to visit the Tsar in Saint Petersburg - a family that includes Ekaterina, a girl of Elena's age. When the two girls' lives collide, an adventure is set in motion, an escapade that includes mistaken identity, a monk locked in a tower, a prince travelling incognito, and - in a starring role only Gregory Maguire could have conjured - Baba Yaga, witch of Russian folklore, in her ambulatory house perched on chicken legs.
Marianne Pinhoe, a young witch discovering her powers, stumbles upon a mysterious egg in her grandmother's attic, which leads her on a magical adventure, along with her fellow enchanter Cat.

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