Restorative justice is the policy of eschewing traditional punishments in favour of group counselling involving both victims and perpetrators. Until now there has been no critical analysis of governmental rationales that legitimize restorative practices over traditional approaches but Governing Practices of Restorative Justice fills this gap and addresses the mentalities of governance most prominent in restorative justice. The author provides comprehensible commentary on the central images of this discursive arena in a style accessible to participants and observers alike of restorative justice.
This 2001 collection looks at the restorative justice movement and the relationship between restorative justice and civil society.
Explores the concept of Restorative Justice in diverse spiritual traditions.
Restorative justice is a relatively new concept in corrections. Repairing Communities examines how restorative justice can be used to rehabilitate offenders as opposed to simply punishing them. This book's contributors examine the benefits of restorative justice to the offender, the victim, and corrections. Topics discussed include: Moral and Philosophical Foundations of Restorative Justice, Community is Not a Place, Linking Crime Prevention to Restorative Justice, Practical Concerns, Building Peace, the VORP Approach, and Community Justice Sanctioning Models. This book includes the vocabulary of restorative justice and real-life examples which demonstrate the principles examined.
Theories and practices of justice do not meet the socio-political challenges of our times. For those theorists attempting to develop an alternative to the criminal justice system, restorative justice has provided an alternative horizon. The restorative justice approach involves meeting people, understanding and recognising their vulnerability through participatory and deliberative forums and practices. The aim of this collection is to bridge the distance between restorative justice and the critical theory tradition. It, on the one hand, takes into account the limits of restorative justice as they have been articulated, or can be articulated through critical social theory, and on the other hand emphasises the ground-breaking potential that restorative justice can bring to this tradition as a way to address crimes, conflicts and injustices, and to pursue justice.
Past methods of probation and parole supervision have largely relied on caseworkers who monitor their "clients" as well as they can. But, as numbers of "clients" increase, studies indicate that this model is ineffectual. The time has come to significantly rethink the approaches to community supervision. This book addresses the specific ways of achieving these goals by presenting six case studies of probation programs that represent a practical side of the community justice ideal. What emerges is a provocative and enlightening new approach to the problems of probation and parole.
Martin Wrightís original ground-breaking and influential analysis of the defects of the adversarial system of justice, plus the arguments in favour of a more constructive and victim-oriented approach. A book that has had a major influence on victimsí issues and restorative justice - and that is essential reading for anyone wishing to understand these developments. One of the most compelling arguments about the need for change in relation to victims and offenders. A critically acclaimed and key work in the annals of criminal justice.
This 2002 book addresses the potential for restorative justice to deal with conflicts within families.
This book addresses the role of victims in our criminal justice system and the shortcomings they perceive in the way they are treated. It examines whether restorative justice can offer them more justice than they receive from the formal court-based system.Research into the shortcomings of the court-based system has identified a number of issues that victims want to address. In brief, they want a less formal process where their views count, more information about both the processing and the outcome of their case, a greater opportunity forparticipation in the way their case is dealt with, fairer and more respectful treatment, and emotional as well as material restoration as an outcome. Over the past three decades, the victim movement worldwide has agitated for an enhanced role for victims in criminal justice. Despite some successes,it appears that structural as well as political factors may mean that victims have won as much as they are likely to gain from formal justice.A series of randomized controlled trials in Canberra, known as the Reintegrative Shaming Experiments (RISE), has provided an opportunity to compare rigorously the impact on victims of court-based justice with a restorative justice program known as conferencing. In these experiments, middle-rangeproperty and violent offences committed by young offenders were assigned either to court (as they would normally have been treated) or to a conference. Empirical evidence from RISE examined in this book suggests that the restorative alternative of conferencing more often than court has the capacity to give victims what they say they want in achieving meaningful victim participation and restoration, especially emotional restoration.
The collection considers the growing importance of the border as a prime site for criminal justice activity and explores the impact of border policing on human rights and global justice. It covers a range of subjects from e-trafficking, child soldiers, the 'global war on terror' in Africa and police activities that generate crime.
This work is a collective reflection on the modern self as a narrative. Modernity as a metamorphic conglomeration of permeating discourses, new practices and institutional forms, a historical unfolding of centrifugal and centripetal discursive dynamics of regulation and normalization offers limitless grounds for a critical investigation. The modern self, both as the revelation of the inner self and as a reflection of the collective, arises from the dialogical interplay within the intersubjective communicative space of social discourse. The bestiary proposed in this series of articles attempts to rethink the spectacle consisting of modern dichotomies by which the self is declined along ontological, metaphysical, and ethical premises: the real and the ideal, the said and the unsaid, the rational and the irrational, the bound and the free, the familiar and the exotic, the universal and the particular, self and world. The reader is therefore encouraged to engage in a multiple reading of the articles presented in this collection. As individual scholarly pieces of inquiry, these articles provide thoughtful insights into the inexhaustible topic of modernity and the modern subject–they tell stories of the past, the present, and of a prospective future. As academic works, however, they also reflect and/or unsettle disciplinary paradigms and scholarly practices, from which they acquire legitimacy and visibility; they conform, apply, reconfigure and/or experiment with new grounds by borrowing from an eclectic mix of various thinkers, their tools, and their axiomatic propositions that constitute their theoretical and critical apparatus. This exercise is ultimately an introspective journey in which we are placed not only as the spectator–the one who gazes through the bars–but also the spectacle–the beast subject to the gaze–finding itself in a predicament of which the subject, itself, is the architect.
Das im Zentrum des neuseelandischen Jugendstrafrechts stehende Forum der -Family Group Conference- - das auf Grundlage der Maori-Kultur entwickelt wurde - ist seit 1989 durch den neuseelandischen -Children, Young Persons, And Their Families Act- im dortigen Jugendstrafrecht verankert und jeder jugendstrafrechtlichen Entscheidung vorgeschaltet. Das Family Group Conferencing gilt mittlerweile vielerorts als vielversprechendes, neuartiges System ausserhalb des Gerichtssaals mit der Moglichkeit, formliche Verfahren zu vermeiden. Aufgrund dessen ist es bereits von vielen anderen Landern adaptiert worden. Aber ist es auch auf das deutsche Recht ubertragbar? Fur die Frage, ob eine solche Adaption auch fur Deutschland sinnvoll und moglich ware, werden zunachst die historischen, kulturellen und sozialen Hintergrunde beider Vergleichslander untersucht und verglichen. Alsdann werden die theoretischen Grundlagen des neuseelandischen Jugendstrafrechtssystems dargestellt. In einem weiteren Schritt werden zehn Experten-Interviews ausgewertet, um die Sicht neuseelandischer Praktiker bezuglich des von Theoretikern hochgelobten Verfahrens zu ergrunden. Nach einer Darstellung des deutschen Jugendstrafrechtssystems und eines Vergleichs mit seinem neuseelandischen Pendant wird in einem abschliessenden Resumee festgestellt, dass die Einfuhrung eines der Family Group Conference vergleichbaren Forums in das deutsche Jugendstrafrecht zu befurworten ware."
This book contains recent cutting-edge articles from leading criminological theorists. The contributors focus on theory rather than empirical research and describe the new theoretical directions of their respective approaches and how they envision the future development of their theories. Taken together the articles represent different multi-disciplinary perspectives and present a cross-section of contemporary criminological theory.
When it was first introduced, the restorative justice movement was met with widespread resistance and skepticism. Now, more than twenty-five years later, the movement has flourished and continues to make great strides in reforming the traditional justice system. Today, the restorative justice movement is Andorsed by many former skeptics. There are 1,300 victim offAnder mediation programs thriving throughout North America and Europe, and this form of mediation is now Andorsed by the American Bar Association.The Handbook of Victim Offender Mediation is the first resource to provide a conceptual-and-research based framework and a practical process for mediating a wide-variety of criminal conflicts between victims of crime and their offAnders. Written by a pioneer in the field, Mark Umbreit-the founding director of the University of Minnesota's Center for Restorative Justice & Peacemaking and the National Restorative Justice Training Institute-this essential resource is based on the empirically grounded principles of restorative justice through victim offAnder mediation, and it explains how to put in place and apply this highly effective process.Step-by-step, this comprehensive handbook clearly defines how the process works, shows how to identify appropriate victim and offAnder participants, and reveals what it takes to prepare both sides for the upcoming meeting, which is facilitated through a humanistic dialogue- driven form of mediation. The Handbook of Victim Offender Mediation also shows how to establish a safe place for dialogue and outlines the most efficient methods for conducting an effective, sensitive, and often emotion- laden victim offAnder mediation. In addition, the author provides practical information for developing ongoing programs and instructions for training mediators, establishing case referral criteria, executing case management procedures, and developing strategies for obtaining referrals from courts and probation officers.This indispensa
Much critical scholarship has detailed the punitive effects of accusations that lead to criminalization. Less well documented is the founding role that accusation plays in creating potential criminals. In an attempt at redress, this collection foregrounds how ideas and rituals of accusation initiate criminalization processes. It offers various perspectives on the mechanisms by which legal persons come to be identified as suitable subjects for criminal justice arenas. By analyzing how criminal accusation operates in theoretical, historical, socio-legal, criminological, political, cultural, and procedural realms, this book launches an important new field of inquiry.

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