The book collects together the work of the late John Hughes, Dean of Jesus College, who died in 2014 in a car crash aged 35. John was a rising star in the Church of England and a much respected intellect. He did his undergraduate theology at Jesus in Cambridge, his Master's work in Oxford with Oliver O'Donovan, and his PhD with Catherine Pickstock in Cambridge whilst training for ordination. John was a much loved teacher with an effective pastoral ministry and colourful character. At his Requiem Mass 120 clergy proceeded the coffin in front of a congregation of a thousand. John was a philosophical theologian with a breadth of interests. Nevertheless, there was an underlying and unifying project. Following in the wake of the Nouvelle Theologie and radical orthodoxy, John's wider project was to show the integral relation of grace and nature. He was thus able to hold together a romantic Christian Socialism, a love of culture and a committed pastoral ministry. For John, there was no pure nature or neutral secular realm, but all things could be seen in the light of faith as graced and caught up in the redeeming love of God. John integrated a rich catholic spirituality and theological understanding with an incisive critique of contemporary philosophical schools.
"Inspired me to ask myself why and to stop postponing the forgotten dreams." —Geneen Roth, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Women Food and God and This Messy Magnificent Life Full of inspirational insights and advice, lifehacks, and real-world examples, Someday is Not a Day in the Week is CEO Sam Horn’s motivational guide to help readers get what they want in life today rather than "someday." Are you: • Working, working, working? • Busy taking care of everyone but yourself? • Wondering what to do with the rest of your life? • Planning to do what makes you happy someday when you have more time, money, or freedom? What if someday never happens? As the Buddha said, “The thing is, we think we have time.” Sam Horn is a woman on a mission about not waiting for SOMEDAY ... and this is her manifesto. Her dad’s dream was to visit all the National Parks when he retired. He worked six to seven days a week for decades. A week into his long-delayed dream, he had a stroke. Sam doesn’t want that to happen to you. She took her business on the road for a Year by the Water. During her travels, she asked people, “Do you like your life? Your job? If so, why? If not, why not?” The surprising insights about what makes people happy or unhappy, what they’re doing about it (or not), and why...will inspire you to carve out time for what truly matters now, not later. Life is much too precious to postpone. It’s time to put yourself in your own story. The good news is, there are “hacks” you can do right now to make your life more of what you want it to be. And you don’t have to be selfish, quit your job, or win the lottery to do them. Sam Horn offers actionable, practical advice in short, snappy chapters to show you how to get started on your best life — now.
Original Scholarly Monograph
Josiah Royce and William James lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on Irving Street, just two doors apart, and Charles Peirce grew up only blocks away. John Dewey was born and educated in nearby Vermont. These four great thinkers shared more than geographic space; they engaged in a series of formative philosophical discussions. By tracing the interactions of Royce (1855–1916) with James, Peirce, and Dewey, Oppenheim "re-imagines pragmatism" in a way that highlights the late Royce's role as mediator and favors the "seed-plant" image of O. W. Holmes, Jr., over the corridor image of Papini. // Josiah Royce emphasized that communities of all sizes—ranging from families to towns—needed "reverence for the relations of life" not only to thrive but to survive. This theme permeates the dialectic of Royce’s interactions with Peirce, James, and Dewey. Oppenheim analyzes the agreement and disagreement of these thinkers on the method and content of philosophy, skepticism and intelligibility, and nominalism and intentionality, as he uncovers their varied stances toward transcendent Reality. // Oppenheim repudiates Ralph Barton Perry’s tactic of using Royce as a foil to display James positively, by offering a richer portrait of Royce. Oppenheim calls attention to Royce’s "doctrine of two levels" and its effects on the distinction of human and super-human, by showing the contrast of Royce’s "third attitude of will" against two primarily self-centered attitudes of will, and by examining the roles of Spirit, Community, and semiotic process in Royce’s late thought.
Grace? A rather mysterious celestial substance, poured into our souls... Grace is indeed mysterious, but exploring it with a little expert help can be fascinating. The author blends the best of contemporary theology with the simplest realities of human experience - smiles, meals, relationships, estrangements - to provide a satisfying and manageable account of Grace. This book encompasses both the intensely personal level of our own graced life-stories and the limitless sweep of God's action in our graced world. God is in the details and even in the mess. This book reveals how God accepts us as we are but also hints at what we are to become. The panorama is breath-taking, as are the social and political implications of trying to be escorts of grace to one another.
By developing a philosophical reconstruction of the moral philosophy that underlies the Secunda Pars of the Summa Theologiae of Thomas Aquinas, Jean Porter illuminates Aquinas' theory of morality and shows its relevance to contemporary Christian ethics.
Provides a theologically substantive yet accessible overview of moral theology grounded in the Catholic tradition that is also illuminative to non-Catholic Christians.
In this comprehensive anthology, twenty-seven outstanding scholars from North America and Europe address every major aspect of Thomas Aquinas's understanding of morality and comment on his remarkable legacy. While there has been a revival of interest in recent years in the ethics of St. Thomas, no single work has yet fully examined the basic moral arguments and content of Aquinas' major moral work, the Second Part of the Summa Theologiae. This work fills that lacuna. The first chapters of The Ethics of Aquinas introduce readers to the sources, methods, and major themes of Aquinas's ethics. The second part of the book provides an extended discussion of ideas in the Second Part of the Summa Theologiae, in which contributors present cogent interpretations of the structure, major arguments, and themes of each of the treatises. The third and final part examines aspects of Thomistic ethics in the twentieth century and beyond. These essays reflect a diverse group of scholars representing a variety of intellectual perspectives. Contributors span numerous fields of study, including intellectual history, medieval studies, moral philosophy, religious ethics, and moral theology. This remarkable variety underscores how interpretations of Thomas's ethics continue to develop and evolve--and stimulate fervent discussion within the academy and the church. This volume is aimed at scholars, students, clergy, and all those who continue to find Aquinas a rich source of moral insight.
If we have learned anything from recent advances in cosmology and astronomy, it is that we have only barely begun to comprehend the vastness of our universe and all that it contains. For Christians, this raises some fascinating questions: If there are intelligent beings out there, what would be their relationship to what Christianity claims is a special history on Earth of life with God? Would the fact of persons on other planets banish or modify our understanding of God? Would it reduce the importance of Jesus? What role might goodness and evil play in extraterrestrial civilizations? Might God have incarnated himself among other races of creatures, as he became incarnate as Jesus among us? Respectful of the sciences that disclose the reality of the universe, Thomas O'Meara wonders about good and evil, intelligence and freedom, revelation and life as they might exist in other galaxies. In this book, one possible aspect of the universe we live in meets the perspective of Christian revelation.
The present volume, the first in the new Catholic Moral Thought series, responds to the need for a new introduction to the basic and central elements of Catholic moral theology written in the light of Veritatis splendor.
The bestselling Catholicism has now been revised and updated for an eagerly-anticipated second edition. This lucid and accessible account explains how Roman Catholicism and its beliefs and practices came to be what they are. Renowned scholars Gerald O'Collins and Mario Farrugia move through history to sum up the present characteristics of Catholic Christianity and the major challenges it faces in the third millennium. Clear and engaging, the authors present matters in a fresh and original way. They skilfully depict the Catholic heritage and show that Catholicism is a dynamic and living faith. O'Collins and Farrugia engage with contemporary moral issues and explore the challenges which Catholics and other Christians must face. This is an authoritative, lively, and up-to-date introduction to Catholicism for the twenty-first century.
BONUS: This edition contains an excerpt from Terry Brooks's The Measure of the Magic. Since the death of Allanon, life in the Four Lands has drastially changed. Yet Par Ohmsford still has some power of the Wishsong. And when a message from the ancient Druid, Allanon, reaches them, Par is ordered to recover the long-lost Sword of Shinnara, and the glory that once was the Four Lands....
We are here on earth not to guard a museum but to cultivate a garden flourishing with life and promised to a glorious future, John XXIII exhorted the Church at the dawn of the Second Vatican Council. In an age when some skeptics suggest that the reformed liturgy has lost the wonder and spiritual depth of previous ages, Standing Together in the Community of God affirms that we need not look back; the Sacred Mysteries are already in our midst. Their wellspring and summit is the heart of God, shared in the Trinity's own communion, announced now as pure Gift. Praising God for God's saving acts in Jesus, as Vatican II reminded us, we encounter Christ's sacramental presence in four modes: in the person of the priest who gathers the community into communion, in the elements and actions of the sacraments, in the word proclaimed and preached, and in the assembly praying and singing (SC #7). In rhythm and harmony, these modes invite us to encounter the multivalent depth of the Mysteries that announce Christ in you, the hope of glory (Col 1:27). Together they proclaim the Risen One among us, the totus Christus, hope for a hungry world. Allowing each mode its respect as a bearer of the sacred, these focal words and actions in the liturgy echo a communion song that announces Christ's real presence to us and for us and with us. Beginning deep within, this is a spirituality and piety for the twenty-first century, ever ancient and ever new. Paul A. Janowiak, SJ, has been an associate professor of sacramental and liturgical theology at the School of Theology and Ministry at Seattle University in Seattle, Washington. He now teaches at the Jesuit School of Theology of Santa Clara University in Berkeley, California.
There is a hunger in the modern world for spirituality. One vast resource of spiritual wisdom comes from the pre-Reformation church--from the martyrs of the first centuries of Christianity, through the long tradition of monasticism, to the medieval Christian mystics. These are the deep wells of Christian reflection from persons such as John Chrysostom, Augustine, Benedict, Francis of Assisi, Bonaventure, Bernard of Clairvaux, Meister Eckhart, Hildegard of Bingen, and Julian of Norwich, to mention just a few. The spiritual insights of over seventy men and women of pre-Reformation Christianity are found in these pages. From these figures we can learn more about the practices of prayer and contemplation, a life of following Christ, the relevance of community, the challenge of asceticism, the movement of withdrawal and engagement, the love of God for God's own sake, living the gospel, sacrificing for the kingdom of God, the longing for union with God, the practices of justice, and a life of prophetic witness. For us, so embedded and shaped by the modern world, this ancient wisdom will come as refreshing water and as a breath of fresh air, with the wings of the Spirit and whispers of angels.
The girl knows she's different. She doesn't age. She has no family. She has visions of a past life, but no clear clues as to what she is, or where she comes from. But there is a face in her dreams – a light that breaks through the darkness. She knows his name is Gabriel. On her way home from work, the girl encounters an injured stranger whose name is Jonah. Soon, she will understand that Jonah belongs to a generation of Vampires that serve darker forces. Jonah and the few like him are fighting with help from an unlikely ally, a rogue Angel named Gabriel. In the crossfire between good and evil, love and hate, and life and death, the girl learns her name: Lailah. But when the lines between black and white begin to blur, where in the spectrum will she find her place? And with whom? Gabriel and Jonah both want to protect her. But Lailah will have to fight her own battle to find out who she truly is.
Dean Koontz, the bestselling master of suspense, invites you into the shocking world of Moonlight Cove—where four unlikely survivors confront the darkest realms of human nature. The citizens of Moonlight Cove, California, are changing. Some are losing touch with their deepest emotions. Others are surrendering to their wildest urges. And the few who remain unchanged are absolutely terrified—if not brutally murdered in the dead of night...
The year was 1939 when a small community near Augusta, Georgia first heard TC utter the riveting phrase, Keep your elbows resting on the needle. TC, a lumberjack and a rich timber baron made a pack. They had stepped across each others shadows since young boys one being of enormous wealth the other having a perfect aim and strength for felling 60 pines and cypress trees. Amidst civil strife, TC convinced a small contingency of friends to follow him deep into the forest across the rugged Acorn Trail to grow their own dreams. On an early morning in May 1945 ten covered wagons had reached the Acorn trail. Having been separated by politics, religion, race and the volatile mixture of love and revenge, few could ever return as the road home was splattered with the blood and ill deeds many had left behind. Forty-five years later, they would take an accounting. Some would call them cowards who high-tailed it. They would offer to drain two manmade lakes slowly. There was Meeliah, an island girl left along while Clay Albert tended to the lives of a rich Philadelphia family and she knew how to bake a pineapple sweet potato pie that could arouse and her jungle sting was severe. Her punishment would be unending; Clay Albert was determined to break her. One day they could not coax her out of the lake. One Sunday three brides-to-be would go off in a huff looking for adventure, a thing called hatching. They came upon a black family. Their intent was to enjoy some freshly churned ice cream and place ribbons in the pretty little girls hair. But three days later, one of the teenage boys would be bludgeoned to death. Was it something they did, said, or wrote? Would Barbara Lynn, a bride-to-be, get to live in the cottage behind the plantation house where slave graves were recently discovered? Did Tim really love her or was he after her blood line. Hed proclaimed, There are no brown spots about me; I am White from tick to tock and my eyes Really? While one community dismantled and escaped into the forest, another one a state away vowed to leave a forest in Dorchester County, South Carolina, beat their tools into cleats and create the greatest civilization of modern times one that would one day leave the gravity of the earth and float among the stars. They had promised their mother a homeland. But first they would tenderly assault unjust social and political structures. Some pressed into their minds that it would take 100 years, but more than one retorted, Were going to do it in one generation. The year is 2012 and counting to 2033 from 1933; a 100 years. Although Thelma claimed to be the mother of more children than any woman known hardly six could be counted at any one time; they having gone on to the other side she said. Shed referred to them as her glories, her carrots. Were they fathom? With little to go on but the suspicious tone of a business attorney and some missing birth certificates, the author recreates this lost civilization in, The Dark Circle The Search for the lost children of the Mud. The tenderness and love between Miles and Thelma Dunston are captured as the, The Slave Girl and the Jew. Five overlapping stories tell of their courage and toils of rebirth of these families and the triumph of the human spirit.
Acclaimed, award-winning essayist and novelist Brian Doyle (1956-2017)--whose writing, in the words of Mary Oliver, is "a gift to us all"--presents one hundred original prayers that evoke his deep Catholic belief in the mystery and miracle of the ordinary (and the whimsical) in human life. In, A Book of Uncommon Prayer: 100 Celebrations of the Miracle & Muddle of the Ordinary, which was named "A Best Spiritual Book of the Year" by Spirituality & Practice, you will find a series of prayers unlike any of the beautiful, formal, orthodox prayers of the Catholic tradition or the warm, extemporized prayers heard from pulpits and dinner tables. Doyle's often-dazzling, always-poignant prayers include eye-opening hymns to shoes and faith and family. In Doyle's words, "the world is crammed with miracles, so crammed and tumultuous that if we stop, see, savor, we are agog," and the pages of his newest book give voice and body to this credo. By focusing on experiences that may seem the most unprayerful (one prayer is titled "Prayer on Seeing Yet Another Egregious Parade of Muddy Paw Prints on the Floor"), he gives permission to discover the joys and treasures in what he often calls the muddle of everyday life.
Natural law theory is controversial today because it presumes that there is a stable 'human nature' that is subject to a 'law.' How do we know that 'human nature' is stable and not ever-evolving? How can we expect 'law' not to constrict human freedom and potential? Furthermore if there is a 'law,' there must be a lawgiver. Matthew Levering argues that natural law theory makes sense only within a broader worldview, and that the Bible sketches both such a persuasive worldview and an account of natural law that offers an exciting portrait of the moral life. To establish the relevance of biblical readings to the wider philosophical debate on natural law, this study offers an overview of modern natural law theories from Cicero to Nietzsche, which reverse the biblical portrait by placing human beings at the center of the moral universe. Whereas the biblical portrait of natural law is other-directed, ordered to self-giving love, the modern accounts turn inward upon the self. Drawing on the thought of St. Thomas Aquinas, Levering employs theological and philosophical investigation to achieve a contemporary doctrine of natural law that accords with the biblical witness to a loving Creator who draws human beings to share in the divine life. This book provides both an introduction to natural law theory and a compelling challenge to re-think current biblical scholarship on the topic.

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