In her fifth case, Episcopal priest and cellist Lavinia Grey--Mother Vinnie to her friends--investigates some strange goings-on in her New Jersey suburb when a man discovers his father's remains are missing from the local cemetery.
PRIVATE INVESTIGATOR Cate Harlow has a terrified new client. A woman named Jennifer Brooks-Warren has come to Catherine Harlow, Private Investigations in desperate need of help; a contract has been put out on her life. Her request is for Cate Harlow to find the professional assassin who has been hired to kill her before he fulfills his contract, something he seems more than able to do considering that he is "a ghost,"the best and most elusive professional eliminator in the world and is off the radar as far as contact goes. Making it all the harder for the intrepid Cate is the name of the person responsible for taking out the contract killing in the first place. It's none other than Jennifer Brooks-Warren herself! Add to the mix the fact that Cate's best friend, Melissa fears the body of one of her former "clients" is about to be exhumed with incriminating evidence of his strange erotic interests, her ex-husband and sometime lover, Detective Will Benigni is driving her crazy studying for his long postponed Bar exam, and her solid-as-a-rock secretary Myrtle Goldberg Tuttle is certain that her loving husband, pastry-baking accountant Harry is cheating on her, and you have the makings of a perfect blend of mystery, thriller, and humor in one page-turning novel. "A master of well-told stories, Houghton deftly layers crime, assassins, and ordinary people in a thriller that readers will enjoy immensely! PI Cate Harlow is the new Queen of Crime!" Victoria Charles, The Examiner "Wild, witty, and utterly irresistible, Houghton perfectly choreographs all the moves in this outstanding mystery murder novel. Wonderful back stories with supporting characters as well!" Carole Nelson Douglas, best-selling author
Twenty-one rare, seldom-anthologized stories include "A Bottomless Grave" by Ambrose Bierce, "The Ship that Saw a Ghost" by Frank Norris, Guy de Maupassant's "The Tomb," other gems of the genre.
Etonians aren't exactly noted for their grey matter, but I've always found them perfectly adjusted to society. Jack, a possible paranoid schizophrenic with a Messiah complex, inherits the title of the 14th Earl of Gurney after his father passes away in a bizarre accident. Singularly unsuited to a life in the upper echelons of elite society, Jack finds himself at the centre of a ruthless power struggle as his scheming family strives to uphold their reputation. Bubbling with acerbic wit and feverish energy, Olivier Award-winning and Oscar-nominated-writer Peter Barnes's razor-sharp satire combines a ferocious mix of hilarity and horror whilst mercilessly exposing the foibles of the English nobility. This edition of the play is published to coincide with the first-ever revival of this classic cult comedy at the Trafalgar Studios, London, on 16 January 2015.
Although much has been said and written about coincidences, there is a marked absence when it comes to the development of a comprehensive model that incorporates the many different ways in which they can be understood and explained. One reason for this omission is undoubtedly the sharp divide that exists between those who find coincidences meaningful and those who do not, with the result that the conclusions of the many books and articles on the subject have tended to fall into distinct camps. The Many Faces of Coincidence attempts to remedy this impasse by proposing an inclusive categorisation for coincidences of all shapes and sizes. At the same time, some of the implications arising from the various explanations are explored, including the possibility of an underlying unity of mind and matter constituting the ground of being.
Alliterative Revivals is the first full-length study of the sophisticated historical consciousness of late medieval alliterative romance. Drawing from historicism, feminism, performance studies, and postcolonial theory, Christine Chism argues that these poems animate British history by reviving and acknowledging potentially threatening figures from the medieval past—pagan judges, primeval giants, Greek knights, Jewish forefathers, Egyptian sorcerers, and dead ancestors. In addressing the ways alliterative poems centralize history—the dangerous but profitable commerce of the present with the past—Chism's book shifts the emphasis from the philological questions that have preoccupied studies of alliterative romance and offers a new argument about the uses of alliterative poetry, how it appealed to its original producers and audiences, and why it deserves attention now. Alliterative Revivals examines eight poems: St. Erkenwald, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, The Wars of Alexander, The Siege of Jerusalem, the alliterative Morte Arthure, De Tribus Regibus Mortuis, The Awntyrs off Arthure, and Somer Sunday. Chism both historicizes these texts and argues that they are themselves obsessed with history, dramatizing encounters between the ancient past and the medieval present as a way for fourteenth-century contemporaries to examine and rethink a range of ideologies. These poems project contemporary conflicts into vivid, vast, and spectacular historical theaters in order to reimagine the complex relations between monarchy and nobility, ecclesiastical authority and lay piety, courtly and provincial culture, western Christendom and its easterly others, and the living and their dead progenitors. In this, alliterative romance joins hands with other late fourteenth-century literary texts that make trouble at the borders of aristocratic culture.
A lawyer by profession, Theodore Martin (1816-1909) gained literary distinction as both a humorous essayist and versatile translator. He found his greatest success, however, in the role of biographer to Prince Albert (1819-61). Commissioned by Queen Victoria to memorialise her late husband, this five-volume work was first published between 1875 and 1880. Intended as a continuation of the biography begun by Charles Grey (also reissued in this series), it has been described as 'less adulatory in tone than might be expected'. A treasury of letters and memoranda, it presents a detailed portrait of the character, words and deeds of a man whose life was necessarily immersed in the great events of his time. Volume 2 covers the period from 1848 to 1854, the births of Princes Arthur and Leopold, the collapse of the Chartist movement and the 'spectacular success' of the Great Exhibition of 1851.
Likoma Island in Lake Malawi is renowned throughout Africa for its exotic and treacherous beauty - and its secret history of human sacrifice, hidden treasure and unspeakable horror. A history that cannot be hidden forever. Lana Devereaux travels to Malawi seeking the truth behind her fathers disappearance near Likoma Island fifteen years ago. But Lana soon finds herself caught in a web of deciet, passion and black magic that stretches back over two hundred years and has ramifications that reach well beyond the shores of Lake Malawi.
This third volume of The Journal Of Claude Fredericks is his journal for the year 1943, a Wanderjahr that begins with a spring in Cambridge, where Volume Two ended, but with Fredericks, having left studies at Harvard, living now in a room at Maud Bemiss house on Nutting Road near the Cowley Fathers, seeing various friends from earlier, Brie Taylor, John Simon, Anthony Clark, Paul Doguereau, the George Sartons, and making new friends as well. The summer is spent in a cabin on the shore near Belfast Maine, writing and studying still and coming to know the family that lives on the hill. In September, after spending ten days with Paul Doguereau and Fanny Mason in Walpole New Hampshire on the beautiful Mason estate overlooking the Connecticut and a month in New York living in an apartment on University Place and seeing his friend May Sarton and coming to know Muriel Rukeyser and Julian Beck, he heads with his friend William Quinn to Iowa to live with several friends of theirs who also have left Harvard, in particular Michael Millen and Paul Rail, all of them proclaiming in different ways, as Quinn and Fredericks do in theirs, their objections to Americas part in the war that had begun in December 1941. After two weeks Fredericks leaves to stay with a friend in Chicago, Martha Johnson, and to settle in and write about the troubling events of the previous days and then go on to Missouri, to pay filial pieties to members of his family there and after that go south with his mother to Mexico City for a week and then with her to Acapulco for ten days at Christmas, a spot at that time still undiscovered and with only two small hotels. Finally at the years end he heads back east to New York, where he has plans to settle down and live forever, in the city he had always loved the most of any he knew.
There is a church not too far from us that recently added a $25 million addition to their building.Our local newspaper ran a front-page story not too long ago about a study revealing that one in five people in our city lives in poverty.This is a book about those two numbers.It's a book about faith and fear,wealth and war,poverty, power, safety, terror,Bibles, bombs, and homeland insecurity,It's about empty empires and the truth that everybody's a priest, it's about oppression, occupation, and what happens when Christians support, animate and participate in the very things Jesus came to set people free from.It's about what it means to be a part of the church of Jesus in a world where some people fly planes into buildings while others pick up groceries in Hummers.
An Afrikaner crime reporter returns home to face the evil and complex legacy of South African apartheid in “a witness-bearing act of the rarest courage” (Michael Kerr). Rian Malan’s classic work of reportage, My Traitor’s Heart is at once beautiful, horrifying, and profound in ways that earned him comparisons to Michael Herr and Ryszard Kapuściński and inspired the London Times to call him “South Africa’s Hunter S. Thompson.” An Afrikaner, Malan is the scion of a centuries-old clan deeply involved in the creation of apartheid. As a young crime reporter, he covered the atrocities of an undeclared race war and ultimately fled the country, unhinged by what he had seen. Eight years later, he returns to confront his own demons, and those that are tearing his country apart. With unflinching candor, Malan explores the grizzly violence and perverse rationalizations at the root of his nation’s identity. Written in the final years of apartheid’s bloody collapse, My Traitor’s Heart still resonates, offering a “passionate, blazingly honest testament” to the darkest recesses of the black and white South African psyches. “Those who read it will never again see South Africa the same way” (Los Angeles Times Book Review).
Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, the 1999 National Book Award for Nonfiction, finalist for the Lionel Gelber Prize and the Kiriyama Pacific Rim Book Prize, Embracing Defeat is John W. Dower's brilliant examination of Japan in the immediate, shattering aftermath of World War II. Drawing on a vast range of Japanese sources and illustrated with dozens of astonishing documentary photographs, Embracing Defeat is the fullest and most important history of the more than six years of American occupation, which affected every level of Japanese society, often in ways neither side could anticipate. Dower, whom Stephen E. Ambrose has called "America's foremost historian of the Second World War in the Pacific," gives us the rich and turbulent interplay between West and East, the victor and the vanquished, in a way never before attempted, from top-level manipulations concerning the fate of Emperor Hirohito to the hopes and fears of men and women in every walk of life. Already regarded as the benchmark in its field, Embracing Defeat is a work of colossal scholarship and history of the very first order. John W. Dower is the Elting E. Morison Professor of History at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for War Without Mercy.
"In the following pages the Author has placed before the reader an account of the changes in the design of Decorative Furniture and Woodwork, from the earliest period of which we have any reliable or certain record until the present time. A careful selection of illustrations has been made, and the representations of the different interiors will convey an idea of the character and disposition of the furniture of the periods to which they refer." Contains chapters on Roman furniture, the Renaissance Period and its variations throughout Europe, Asian furniture, and many more. Originally released in 1892.
Jack Whyte has written a lyrical epic, retelling the myths behind the boy who would become the Man Who Would Be King--Arthur Pendragon. He has shown us, as Diana Gabaldon said, "the bone beneath the flesh of legend." In his last book in this series, we witnessed the young king pull the sword from the stone and begin his journey to greatness. Now we reach the tale itself-how the most shining court in history was made. Clothar is a young man of promise. He has been sent from the wreckage of Gaul to one of the few schools remaining, where logic and rhetoric are taught along with battle techniques that will allow him to survive in the cruel new world where the veneer of civilization is held together by barbarism. He is sent by his mentor on a journey to aid another young man: Arthur Pendragon. He is a man who wants to replace barbarism with law, and keep those who work only for destruction at bay. He is seen, as the last great hope for all that is good. Clothar is drawn to this man, and together they build a dream too perfect to last--and, with a special woman, they share a love that will nearly destroy them all... The name of Clothar may be unknown to modern readers, for tales change in the telling through centuries. But any reader will surely know this heroic young man as well as they know the man who became his king. Hundreds of years later, chronicles call Clothar, the Lance Thrower, by a much more common name. That of Lancelot. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
A reappraisal of Lope's literary career, bringing out the complexities of his dramatic texts.

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