Here is a popular book with big set-piece descriptions accompanied by illustrations at its core, but with enough science to attract both the specialist reader and to educate the lay reader without scaring them off. Disaster books traditionally feed on hype, sensationalism and bad science. Eden redresses the balance. What then is the place of weather disasters in our climate? Are they freaks or a necessary part of the whole? How rare are meteorological event does it take to cause chaos in our day-to-day lives? Are we becoming more at risk and less capable of dealing with them? Or do we just complain more? These days we try and mitigate the effects of different hazards, by acquiring personal and property protection - individually, personally and politically. So what is the role of local and central government, the insurance industry, the media and the public? And how do we actually measure disaster? By rarity, insurance cost, death toll, recovery times or what? Can we merge all these so we can compare -say- the 1976 drought with the 1891 blizzard? Can we rank disasters? 15,000 died in the European heatwave of August 2003. Is this the shape of things to come? What will happen if the Gulf Stream/North Atlantic Drift stops flowing? Here are just a few of Philip Eden's topics in a book which will be riveting to readers.
From deciding the best day for a picnic, to the devastating effects of hurricanes and typhoons, the weather impacts our lives on a daily basis. Although new techniques allow us to forecast the weather with increasing accuracy, most people do not realize the vast global movements and forces which result in their day-to-day weather. In this Very Short Introduction, Storm Dunlop explains what weather is and how it differs from climate, discussing what causes weather, and how we measure it. Analyzing the basic features and properties of the atmosphere, he shows how these are directly related to the weather experienced on the ground, and to specific weather phenomena and extreme weather events. He describes how the global patterns of temperature and pressure give rise to the overall circulation within the atmosphere, the major wind systems, and the major oceanic currents, and how features such as mountains and the sea affect local weather. He also looks at examples of extreme and dangerous weather, such as of tropical cyclones (otherwise known as hurricanes and typhoons), describing how "Hurricane Hunters" undertake the dangerous task of flying through them. We measure weather in a number of ways: observations taken on the land and sea; observations within the atmosphere; and measurements from orbiting satellites. Dunlop concludes by looking at how these observations have been used to develop increasingly sophisticated long and short-range weather forecasting, including ensemble forecasting. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
The perfect companion to learning about the weather, no matter where you live or whether it is raining or sunny outside, an enlightening and entertaining miscellany of our planet’s most complex, diverse and powerful system -without which life simply would not exist.
This highly readable and informative guide imparts a wealth of solid scientific data about hurricanes, tornadoes, thunderstorms, wind, fog, ice storms, and other events. The text is embellished with 72 drawings and 20 photographs.
It has been estimated that, as a result of natural disasters, during the 1970s and 1980s three million lives were lost worldwide, the number of disasters increased threefold, the economic losses per decade almost doubled and the insurance losses quadrupled. In the light of these figures, the United Nations proclaimed the 1990s as the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction and this book focuses on the British contribution to the Decade and is supplemented by papers from America, Asia, Europe and Africa.
The North Sea regions are some of the busiest shipping lanes in the world (which have recently seen the introduction of oil and gas rigs), and the surrounding land areas are some of the most populous. This book presents a historical investigation of great storms that have affected the North Sea and neighboring northern seas, the British Isles, and the fringe of northwest Europe. All those wind storms with serious effects that could be identified within the past 500-600 years are recorded and a few earlier cases discussed. In every case, observations of weather and other circumstances reported during the storm have been used to produce a modern and reasonably full meteorological analysis that will facilitate wind strength estimates and wind measurements and aid in the diagnosis of storm origins. As a scientific study, this work takes advantage of the unequaled abundance in this region of historical reports and records. The book is destined to further meteorological understanding and help examine weather trends and secular variations and the impact of storms on human affairs, especially in damage to buildings, forests, and other aspects of the landscape, particularly coasts. It will be of interest to atmospheric scientists, engineers, geographers, historians, and administrators.
This book is a collection of twenty one papers presented during the symposium on Coping with Natural Hazards at University of Pune on 5 and 6 October 2001. This very successful symposium, organised by the National Academy of Sciences, outlined the strategies our country should adopt to be prepared to face hazards like earthquakes, floods, landslides, avalanches, cyclones, droughts and desertification. It contains papers by pre-eminent scientists and leading lights like Professors M G K Menon, P K Das, D R Sikka and R K Bhandari and many others. Each paper has been critically reviewed by atleast two experts in their respective fields.
'China's reemergence as a global economic powerhouse has compressed into a single generation an industrial and urban revolution on a scale the world has never seen. Its transformation looks to many foreigners, and to millions of newly prosperous Chinese, like a near-miraculous escape from the agonies of its recent history - late imperial, warlord-republican and Maoist. The great merit of Jonathan Fenby's vivid account of the years since 1850 is to underline how heavily that history still weighs on the present' Rosemary Righter, The Times
Weather is the quintessential Canadian story. Despite it's characterization in the rest of the world as a land of bush and blizzards, Canada is a country of geographical and climatic variations. It experiences just about every type of extreme weather possible - tornadoes, droughts, dust storms, ice storms, hail storms, hurricanes, floods - in addition to lots of snowstorms. The weather is rarely boring and there are times when it has been so extreme, it has surprised everyone.
At Risk reasserts the significance of the human factor in disasters. Establishing that the social, political and economic environment is as much a cause of disasters as the natural environment, the book argues that disaster mitigation is rooted in the potential humans have to understand their vulnerability and to take common action. Famines and drought, biological hazards, floods, coastal storms, earthquakes, volcanoes and landslides: At Risk draws practical and policy conclusions with a view to disaster reduction and the promotion of a safer environment.
Es wird alles immer schlimmer, eine schreckliche Nachricht jagt die andere: Die Reichen werden reicher, die Armen ärmer. Es gibt immer mehr Kriege, Gewaltverbrechen, Naturkatastrophen. Viele Menschen tragen solche beängstigenden Bilder im Kopf. Doch sie liegen damit grundfalsch. Unser Gehirn verführt uns zu einer dramatisierenden Weltsicht, die mitnichten der Realität entspricht, wie der geniale Statistiker und Wissenschaftler Hans Rosling erklärt. Wer das Buch gelesen hat, wird • ein sicheres, auf Fakten basierendes Gerüst besitzen, um die Welt so zu sehen, wie sie wirklich ist • die zehn gängigsten Arten von aufgebauschten Geschichten erkennen • bessere Entscheidungen treffen können • wahre Factfulness erreichen – jene offene, neugierige und entspannte Geisteshaltung, in der Sie nur noch Ansichten teilen und Urteile fällen, die auf soliden Fakten basieren

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