This series offers comprehensive coverage of countries around the world. The emphasis of the series will be on up-to-date information, current affairs, and newsworthy entries. Each book will offer complete coverage of one country, including sections on society, geography, culture, people, history, and economy.
This historical essay explores Greece in the 1990s. It seeks to illuminate vital aspects of the Greek phenomenon using themes such as politics, institutions, society, ideology, foreign policy, geography and culture.
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Examining every aspect of the culture from antiquity to the founding of Constantinople in the early Byzantine era, this thoroughly cross-referenced and fully indexed work is written by an international group of scholars. This Encyclopedia is derived from the more broadly focused Encyclopedia of Greece and the Hellenic Tradition, the highly praised two-volume work. Newly edited by Nigel Wilson, this single-volume reference provides a comprehensive and authoritative guide to the political, cultural, and social life of the people and to the places, ideas, periods, and events that defined ancient Greece.
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In this collection of new essays, an international group of experts explores the significance of reciprocity (the principle and practice of voluntary requital, of benefit for benefit or harm for harm) in ancient Greek culture. Reciprocity has been seen as an important notion for anthropologists studying economic and social relations. A key question has been whether reciprocity constitutes an alternative pattern to the commercial, political, and ethical relationships characteristic of modern Western society. This volume takes the question forward in connection with Greek culture from Homer to the Hellenistic period. Building on previous research on this topic (especially on Homeric society), it provides a wide-ranging examination of reciprocity inGreek epic and drama, historiography, oratory, religion, and ethical philosophy. It asks fundamental questions about the importance of reciprocity in different phases of Greek history, the interplay between reciprocity and the ideology of Athenian democracy, and between reciprocity and altruism in ethical thought. Clear and non-technical, with all Greek translated, this volume will make debate on this important subject available to a wide circle of readers in classical, literary, anthropological, and historical studies.
Grote's classic twelve-volume work established the shape of Greek history which prevails in accounts of the ancient world today.
Follow the fascinating course of history from classical Greece to the development of the modern nation in this fascinating portrait of Greek culture. From the most well-known temples and ruins of ancient Athens, Crete, and Delphi, to the contemporary disputes on the Island of Cyprus, students will gain an impressive understanding of Greek culture through the use of thought-provoking primary source material. Greece: A Primary Source Cultural Guide illuminates the origins of Greek mythology, examines ancient historical conflicts, and allows students a chance to glimpse such remarkable structures as the Parthenon and Acropolis alongside a comprehensive examination of the country, its people, and its influential artistic achievements.
The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome is the clearest and most accessible guide to the world of classical antiquity ever produced. This multivolume reference work is a comprehensive overview of the major cultures of the classical Mediterranean world--Greek, Hellenistic, and Roman--from the Bronze Age to the fifth century CE. It also covers the legacy of the classical world and its interpretation and influence in subsequent centuries. The Encyclopedia brings the work of the best classical scholars, archaeologists, and historians together in an easy-to-use format. The articles, written by leading scholars in the field, seek to convey the significance of the people, places, and historical events of classical antiquity, together with its intellectual and material culture. Broad overviews of literature, history, archaeology, art, philosophy, science, and religion are complimented by articles on authors and their works, literary genres and periods, historical figures and events, archaeologists and archaeological sites, artists and artistic themes and materials, philosophers and philosophical schools, scientists and scientific areas, gods, heroes, and myths. Areas covered include: · Greek and Latin Literature · Authors and Their Works · Historical Figures and Events · Religion and Mythology · Art, Artists, Artistic Themes, and Materials · Archaeology, Philosophers, and Philosophical Schools · Science and Technology · Politics, Economics, and Society · Material Culture and Everyday Life
This is the first general monograph on ancient Greek dress in English to be published in more than a century. By applying modern dress theory to the ancient evidence, this book reconstructs the social meanings attached to the dressed body in ancient Greece. Whereas many scholars have focused on individual aspects of ancient Greek dress, from the perspectives of literary, visual, and archaeological sources, this volume synthesizes the diverse evidence and offers fresh insights into this essential aspect of ancient society.
Focuses on the ancient arts and modern treasures of Greece, introducing its mythology, crafts, foods, festivals, and Olympic games.
The development of Greek sculpture, architecture, and painting during the Classical period is examined within a social and cultural context
Largely excluded from any public role, the women of ancient Greece nonetheless appear in various guises in the art and writing of the period, and in legal documents. These representations reveal a great deal about women's day-to-day experience as well as their legal and economic position - and how they were regarded by men.
Now reissued in a second, updated edition, this book provides a concise, illustrated introduction to the history of modern Greece, from the first stirrings of the national movement in the late eighteenth century to the present day. It is designed to provide a basic introduction for general and academic readers with little or no prior knowledge of the subject, and supersedes Professor Clogg's A Short History of Modern Greece which became a classic following its initial publication in 1979. This wholly new book, first published in 1992, was conceived afresh for a broad readership.
This is new to the Key Themes in Ancient History series, a range of books designed for students and teachers of ancient history, aimed at providing a readable, authoritative and concise introduction to some of the major topics in Greek and Roman history. In Sport and Society in Ancient Greece , the author addresses such important themes as the link between sport, religion and warfare and the games as an arena for expression of difference between individuals or groups, while providing a guide to the ancient evidence and to the current state of thinking on the subject. He also evaluates the significance of these themes in our understanding of ancient culture. The book contains a useful bibliographical essay with suggestions for further reading, a complete list of works cited and a nice calendar of important dates for the evidence.
The art of classical Greece, and its political and philosophical ideas, have had a profound influence on Western civilization. It was in the fifth and fourth centuries B.C. that this Greek cultureâe"material, political and intellectualâe"reached its zenith. At the same time, the Greek states were at their most powerful and quarrelsome. J. K. Davies traces the flowering of this extraordinary society, drawing on a wealth of documentary material: houses and graves, extant sculpture and vases, as well as the writings of historians, orators, biographers, dramatists, and philosophers.

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