Grief is a personal journey, never the same for any two people and as unique as your life and your relationships. Although loss is an inevitable part of life, how you approach this fact can make the difference between meaningless pain and the manifestation of understanding and wisdom. This book describes a mindful approach to dealing with grief that can help you make that difference. By walking this mindful path, you will discover that you are capable of transforming and healing the grief you carry and finding the spiritual and emotional resilience you need to move through this challenging time. These mindfulness practices, explained here in simple and practical language, will help you bear your time of grief. But they will do more than that, too. They will guide you to a life more fully lived, with more meaning. These simple practices will help you experience what richness comes from asking deeper questions about loss and about life.
In this compassionate and practical book, a Buddhist psychotherapist, Sameet Kumar, Ph.D., who specializes in applying meditation techniques to clinical problems, uses a unique combination of Buddhist spiritual practice and proven psychological strategies to help readers develop, understand, and transform their grief.
Grief is a personal journey, never the same for any two people and as unique as your life and your relationships. Although loss is an inevitable part of life, how you approach this fact can make the difference between meaningless pain and the manifestation of understanding and wisdom. This book describes a mindful approach to dealing with grief that can help you make that difference. By walking this mindful path, you will discover that you are capable of transforming and healing the grief you carry and finding the spiritual and emotional resilience you need to move through this challenging time. These mindfulness practices, explained here in simple and practical language, will help you bear your time of grief. But they will do more than that, too. They will guide you to a life more fully lived, with more meaning. These simple practices will help you experience what richness comes from asking deeper questions about loss and about life.
If you have lost a loved one suddenly or traumatically, have experienced extreme trauma yourself, or simply cannot process the death of someone dear to you, the pain can be overwhelming. For most people, grief resolves on its own, given time; but for many others, grief can lead to serious psychological problems such as depression, anxiety, anger, and an intense, inconsolable yearning for the deceased. Prolonged or complicated grief is a serious psychological condition that can leave you feeling dazed, stunned, or in shock for months or even years after your loss. Your sorrow does not diminish with time. In fact, it may even increase. No matter how much support you receive from family and friends, you simply cannot “get over it.” However, there are steps you can take to begin healing. Mindfulness for Prolonged Grief offers you real tools for overcoming the painful symptoms of prolonged grief. In the book, you will learn to relieve your pain by maintaining a healthy lifestyle, improving the quality of your sleep, and reconnecting with your life’s goals. In addition, you will discover how mindfulness exercises and guided meditations can help you process your grief, manage your intense emotions, and deal with loss without resorting to avoidant behaviors (such as addiction) as coping mechanisms. Loss is an extremely painful part of life, but with help you can build the resilience you need to heal, and use your grief as a powerful vehicle for growth.
Do you find yourself ruminating about things you can't control? Worrying about those yet-to-complete goals and projects? What about just feeling like you're not the person you want to be? People who worry and ruminate find it difficult to stop anxiously anticipating future events and regretting or rethinking past actions. Left unchecked, this tendency can lead to mental health problems such as depression and generalized anxiety disorder. The Mindful Path Through Worry and Rumination offers powerful mindfulness strategies derived from Buddhist spiritual practices and proven psychological techniques to help you stop overthinking what you can't control-the future and the past-and learn how to find contentment in the present moment.
Soothing mindfulness exercises to help you cope during your time of grief. Without proper support, navigating the icy waters of grief may feel impossible. The grieving person may feel spiritually bankrupt and often the loss is so painful that the bereaved may lose faith in what they once held dear. Mindfulness meditation can restore hope by offering a compassionate safe haven for healing and self-reflection. While nobody can predict the path of someone else's grief, this book will guide the reader forward through the grieving process with simple mindfulness-based exercises to restore mind, body and spirit. These easy-to-follow meditations will help the reader to cope with the pain of loss, and embark on a healing journey. Each chapter focuses on a different aspect of grief, and the guided meditations will calm the mind and increase clarity and focus. Mindfulness and Grief will help readers to begin the process of reconstructing the shattered self that is left in the wake of any major loss.
For those who have suffered the loss of a loved one, here are strength and thoughtful words to inspire and comfort.
If you’ve experienced loss, you may feel intense emotional or even physical pain. In fact, it’s not uncommon for grieving people to experience depression, anxiety, fatigue, and a variety of other physical, mental, and spiritual symptoms. If you’ve tried other ways to move beyond your loss but have yet to find relief, you may be surprised to discover the transformative effects of yoga. Yoga for Grief Relief combines over 100 illustrations of gentle yogic poses and the power of psychophysiology and neuroscience to help you recapture a true sense of well-being. You’ll also find breathing exercises, cleansing techniques, and self-relaxation tips to help you work through your loss and begin on the journey to self-knowledge and re-identification. At its core, yoga is about accepting change. If you are open to viewing your loss as an opportunity for growth, this book will help transform your grief with gentle clarity and awareness. To find out more, visit yogaforgriefrelief.com
Now there is a hand to hold... Each year about eight million Americans suffer the death of someone close to them. Now for thse who face the challenges of sudden death, there is a hand to hold, written by two women who have experienced sudden loss. This updated edition of the best-selling bereavement classic will touch, comfort, uplift and console. Authors Brook Noel and Pamela D. Blair, Ph.D. explore sudden death and offers a comforting hand to hold for those who are grieving the sudden death of a loved one. Featured on ABC World News, Fox and Friends and many other shows, this book acts as a touchstone of sanity through difficult times. I Wasn't Ready to Say Goodbye covers such difficult topics as the first few weeks, suicide, death of a child, children and grief, funerals and rituals, physical effects, homicide and depression. New material covers the unique circumstances of loss, men and women's grieving styles, religion and faith, myths and misunderstandings, I Wasn't Ready to Say Goodbye reflects the shifting face of grief. These pages have offered solace to over eighty thousand people, ranging from seniors to teenagers and from the newly bereaved to those who lost a loved one years ago. Individuals engulfed by the immediate aftermath will find a special chapter covering the first few weeks. Tapping their personal histories and drawing on numerous interviews, authors Brook Noel and Pamela D. Blair, Ph.D, explore unexpected death and its role in the cycle of life. I Wasn't Ready to Say Goodbye provides survivors with a rock-steady anchor from which to weather the storm of pain and begin to rebuild their lives. PRAISE FOR I WASN'T READY TO SAY GOODBYE "I highly recommend this book, not only to the bereaved, but to friends and counselors as well." Helen Fitzgerald, author of The Grieving Child, The Mourning Handbook, and The Grieving Teen "This book, by women who have done their homework on grief... can hold a hand and comfort a soul through grief 's wilderness. Oustanding references of where to see other help." George C. Kandle, Pastoral Psychologist "Finally, you have found a friend who can not only explain what has just occurred, but can take you by the hand and lead you to a place of healing and personal growth. Whether you are dealing with the loss of a family member, a close personal associate or a friend, this guide can help you survive and cope, but even more importantly... heal." The Rebecca Review "For those dealing with the loss of a loved one, or for those who want to help someone who is, this is a highly recommended read." Midwest Book Review
A therapist and expert on grief is faced with the slow decline of her beloved mother. She imparts to the reader lessons learned, both personal and professional, in anticipating grief and the loss of a loved one. 'This is a unique book by a professional who understands the field of loss and grief ... Poignantly heartbreaking.' - Melba Vasquez, President, American Psychology Association's Division on Counseling Psychology.
This is a self-help grief recovery book for anyone who is going through anticipatory grief - early grief before a death or dreaded event has occured. It is packed with coping tips and, best of all, 114 Healing Steps, which lead the reader to his or her healing path.
Everyone experiences grief, but few books offer real help with the debilitating emotions of bereavement.
Why are more and more psychotherapists embracing meditation practice, while so many Buddhists are exploring psychology? “Both psychology and Buddhism seek to provide freedom from suffering,” explains Bruce Tift, “yet each offers a completely different approach for reaching this goal.” In Already Free, Tift opens a fresh and provocative dialogue between these two profound perspectives on the human condition. Tift reveals how psychotherapy’s “Developmental” approach of understanding the way our childhood wounds shape our adult selves both contradicts and supports the “Fruitional” approach of Buddhism, which tells us that the freedom we seek is always available. In this investigation, he uncovers insights for connecting with authentic experience, releasing behaviors that no longer serve us, enhancing our relationships, and more. “When we use the Western and Eastern approaches together,” writes Bruce Tift, “they can help us open to all of life—its richness, its disturbances, and its inherent completeness.”
Amid the world-shattering pain of loss, what helps? “After the death of his beloved partner from cancer, Newland finds himself asking how effective his long years of Buddhist practice have been in helping him come to terms with overwhelming grief. This finely written book offers a lucid meditation on what it means to practice the Dharma when everything falls apart.” —Stephen Batchelor, author of Buddhism without Beliefs and After Buddhism In the tradition of C. S. Lewis’s A Grief Observed, Guy Newland offers this brave record of falling to pieces and then learning to make sense of his pain and grief within his spiritual tradition. Drawing inspiration from all corners of the Buddhist world—from Dogen and the Dalai Lama, to Pema Chödrön and ancient Pali texts—this book reverberates with honesty, kindness, and deep humanity. Newland shows us the power of responding fully and authentically to the death of a loved one. “A sad, beautiful, and necessary book—and a map waiting for many who will need it.” —James Ishmael Ford, author of If You’re Lucky Your Heart Will Break “Guy Newland faces squarely the pain of death and the pain of grief and offers a work of uncommon power, insight, and honesty—and extraordinary compassion.” —Jay L. Garfield, author of Engaging Buddhism
Helping widows and widowers learn how to cope with the grief of losing their helpmate, their lover, and perhaps their financial provider, this guide shows them how to find continued meaning in life when doing so seems difficult. Bereaved spouses will find advice on when and how to dispose of their mate's belongings, dealing with their children, and redefining their role with friends and family. Suggestions are provided for elderly mourners, young widows and widowers, unmarried lovers, and same-sex partners. The information and comfort offered apply to individuals whose spouse died recently or long ago.
The five stages of grief are so deeply imbedded in our culture that no American can escape them. Every time we experience loss—a personal or national one—we hear them recited: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. The stages are invoked to explain everything from how we will recover from the death of a loved one to a sudden environmental catastrophe or to the trading away of a basketball star. But the stunning fact is that there is no validity to the stages that were proposed by psychiatrist Elisabeth Kübler-Ross more than forty years ago. In The Truth About Grief, Ruth Davis Konigsberg shows how the five stages were based on no science but nonetheless became national myth. She explains that current research paints a completely different picture of how we actually grieve. It turns out people are pretty well programmed to get over loss. Grieving should not be a strictly regimented process, she argues; nor is the best remedy for pain always to examine it or express it at great length. The strength of Konigsberg’s message is its liberating force: there is no manual to grieving; you can do it freestyle. In the course of clarifying our picture of grief, Konigsberg tells its history, revealing how social and cultural forces have shaped our approach to loss from the Gettysburg Address through 9/11. She examines how the American version of grief has spread to the rest of the world and contrasts it with the interpretations of other cultures—like the Chinese, who focus more on their bond with the deceased than on the emotional impact of bereavement. Konigsberg also offers a close look at Kübler-Ross herself: who she borrowed from to come up with her theory, and how she went from being a pioneering psychiatrist to a New Age healer who sought the guidance of two spirits named Salem and Pedro and declared that death did not exist. Deeply researched and provocative, The Truth About Grief draws on history, culture, and science to upend our country’s most entrenched beliefs about its most common experience.
We tend to understand grief as a predictable five-stage process of denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. But in The Other Side of Sadness, George Bonanno shows that our conventional model discounts our capacity for resilience. In fact, he reveals that we are already hardwired to deal with our losses efficiently - not by graduating through static phases. Weaving in explorations of mourning rituals and the universal experiences of the death of a parent or child, Bonanno examines how our inborn emotions - anger and denial, but also relief and joy - help us deal effectively with loss. And grieving goes beyond mere sadness; it can deepen interpersonal connections and often involves positive experiences. In the end, mourning is not predictable, but incredibly sophisticated. Combining personal anecdotes and original research, The Other Side of Sadness is a must-read for those going through the death of a loved one, mental health professionals, and readers interested in neuroscience and positive psychology.
Included are essays by Shunryu Suzuki, Beginner's Mind; Sam Keen, Fire in the Belly; E.F. Schumacher, Small is Beautiful; Joanna Macy, World as Lover, World as Self; Gary Snyder, Pultzer Prize-winning poet and author of The Practice of the Wild, and many others.
Just as grief is an experience that affects us physically, mentally, emotionally, cognitively, and spiritually, yoga sustains and strengthens us in all of those same areas. This book demonstrates how the principles and practices of yoga can help relieve symptoms of grief allowing those who have experienced loss to move toward wholeness, peace, and feelings of connection with loved ones who have died. Exploring the six branches of yoga, the book shows how each branch can support us through grief in different ways whether it be the self-reflection of Jnana Yoga, the spiritual devotion of Bhakti Yoga, the meditation of Raja Yoga, or the physical postures of Hatha Yoga. We are shown how to begin and sustain a personal practice, both on and off the yoga mat, which helps us to cope with and move through grief on multiple levels. Expressive and experiential exercises are included to help explore each of the branches of yoga and find ways to put the tenets of each branch into real life practice.
Acknowledging the unique set of symptoms that accompanies a period of mourning, this guide is the ideal companion to weathering the storm of physical distress. From muscle aches and pains to problems with eating and sleeping, this handbook addresses how the body responds to the impact of profound loss. Low energy, headaches, and other conditions are also taken into account. With 100 ways to help soothe the body and calm the mind, this compassionate study is an excellent resource in understanding the connection between the two.

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