Viele Radiohörer der 50er und 60er Jahre haben ihn noch im Ohr, wenn er sich mit seinem kunstvoll fehlerhaften Deutsch als »Mister Pumpernickel« am Mikrofon meldete und als Deutschlands erster Discjockey seine Schallplatten auf den Teller legte. Aber daß der Engländer und Wahldeutsche Chris Howland, später auch TV-Moderator des legendären »Studio B«, viele Jahre in seiner Muttersprache Erzählungen schrieb, weiß kaum jemand – Geschichten über eine vergangene Zeit: eine Kindheit im England des Krieges, das Rekrutenleben in der englischen Armee in den ersten Monaten nach Kriegsende und vor allem über den Einsatz des jungen Soldaten im besetzten und zerstörten Deutschland als Radiosprecher des englischen Soldatensenders BFN.
In Happy Days, Samuel Beckett pursues his relentless search for the meaning of existence, probing the tenuous relationships that bind one person to another, and each to the universe, top time past and time present. Once again, stripping theater to its barest essentials, Happy Days offers only two characters: Winnie, a woman of about fifty, and Willie, a man of about sixty. In the first act Winnie is buried up to her waist in a mound of earth, but still has the use of her arms and few earthly possessions—toothbrush, tube of toothpaste, small mirror, revolver, handkerchief, spectacles; in the second act she is embedded up to her neck and can move only her eyes. Willie lives and moves—on all fours—behind the mound, appearing intermittently and replying only occasionally into Winnie’s long monologue, but the knowledge of his presence is a source of comfort and inspiration to her, and doubtless the prerequisite for all her “happy days.”
Olly Murs invites you behind the scenes in his official illustrated autobiography filled with hundreds of brand new and exclusive photos. 'My life has been a non-stop roller-coaster of extreme emotions, crazy days, unexpected highs and yet my life hasn't been without its low points too. I've tried to imagine myself sitting down with you explaining what I was thinking and feeling during those times. I hope this book will give you a behind-the-scenes view of my journey into a place where I finally found what had been missing in my life for all those years: music.' Endearingly written with disarming honesty and filled with exclusive new and unseen photographs on and offstage, Happy Days takes you closer to Olly than you've ever been before.
Excerpt from Happy Days Hough tloe lovely Nin All loula' pass away Why should Woman fine, If out Fashion stay? About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
In the 21st century, why do we keep talking about the fifties and sixties? In "Happy Days and Wonder Years", Daniel Marcus reveals how interpretations of these decades have figured in the cultural politics of the United States since 1970.
Two couples, each with a twelve-year-old child, travel to Paris; within a few moments of discovering each other in a crowd, one of their children disappears. A day later, one of the mothers disappears, too. The story that follows is a wonderfully strange, beautifully composed examination of happiness and desperation, complete with a man in a bear suit, a teen pop star, and eight really excellent songs. Sheila Heti’s debut play was first commissioned in 2001, for a feminist theater company that never ended up staging it. Its turbulent creation became the backdrop of Heti’s last novel, How Should a Person Be?, which was named a Best Book of the Year by the New York Times and the New Yorker—and now the play itself can be revealed at last. With new introductions by Sheila Heti and director Jordan Tannahill, All Our Happy Days Are Stupid offers a novel’s worth of wisdom and humor, of wild hope and dreamlike confrontations, and page after page of unforgettable lines. Seen until now only by a lucky few, its publication is a cause for celebration.
Though best known for his caustic newspaper columns, H. L. Mencken's most enduring contribution to American literature may be his autobiographical writings, most of which first appeared in the New Yorker. In Happy Days, Mencken recalls memories of a safe and happy boyhood in the Baltimore of the 1880s and celebrates a way of life that he saw swiftly changing—from a time of straw hats and buggy rides to locomotives and bread lines.
Acclaimed 60 Minutes commentator and true-crime author Shana Alexander turns her journalist’s eye to her own unconventional family—and herself—in this fascinating, moving memoir Shana Alexander spent most of her life trying to figure out her enigmatic parents. Milton Ager was a famous songwriter whose creations included “Ain’t She Sweet” and “Happy Days Are Here Again.” Cecelia Ager was a film critic and Variety columnist. They were a glamorous Jazz Age couple that moved in charmed circles with George and Ira Gershwin, Dorothy Parker, and Jerome Kern. They remained together for fifty-seven years, and yet they lived separate lives. This wise, witty, unflinchingly candid memoir is also a revealing account of Alexander’s own life, from her successful career as a writer and national-news commentator to her troubled marriages and emotionally wrenching love affairs. She shares insights about growing up with a cold, hypercritical mother, her relationship with her younger sister, the suicide of her adopted daughter, and her reconciliation with her parents after a twenty-year estrangement. “I had to do a lot of detective work to uncover the truth about my parents’ lives,” Alexander said. “I knew almost nothing about them as people. But by the end they really did become my best friends.”
The apocalypse has come and gone. The dead are walking the earth. Humanity is down to its few surviving members, eeking out a primitive existence behind the fortified walls of a compound in the middle of a desert wasteland. Law and government are dead- just like most of the people- leaving a morally grey code of conduct in their place. And I couldnt be happier. See, Ive had urges my entire life; urges that would have eventually had me strapped into an electric chair if polite society had stayed the same. Sometimes I could control my needs; sometimes not. But now - in this broken America- Im an Exterminator. My job is to seek out any threat and put it down, and damn it, I love my work. But twenty-four hours can change everything, and a morally grey code of conduct can turn black just as quickly. Thats when you find out who you really are, and what youre actually capable of doing. Welcome to Branberry Street; were the little cul-de-sac at the end of the world. Dexter meets Zombieland. A must read for lovers of the zombie genre. John Palick 5 stars.Inkitt.com Praise for the Black Directive N.D. Mellens epic debut...Fabulously grisly...Gives fans of dark, violent fantasy exactly what they crave. Kirkus If Buffy the Vampire Slayer could transform into a Super Saiyan, youd have Maqui Tomisson. Max Tabree, author of Bully Server
"This true tale of a Hollywood childhood, a fairytale role in one of television's all-time most popular shows, and a journey to dynamic and radiant health through a living-foods diet reveals author Cathy Silvers to be as enthusiastic an advocate of healthy living as "Jenny Piccolo" was boy-crazy"--Provided by publisher.
Political conventions in years past were more than pep rallies for preselected candidates -- they were suspenseful, no-holds-barred battles for the nomination. In 1932, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the man who would become one of America's most beloved presidents, was far from a shoo-in for the Democratic nomination at the party's convention in Chicago. Using new sources of information, award-winning reporter Steve Neal weaves the compelling story of how FDR finally got the nod along with the personalities of the day who influenced the decision, including Joseph P. Kennedy, Al Smith, Huey Long, and William Randolph Hearst.
Everyone's favourite troublemaker, William Brown, is back in a hilarious collection of classic Just William stories - now with a brand new cover-look illustrated by Steven Lenton. When William's mother offers him a birthday party, he is suspicious - what's the catch? Convinced that he will have to do something boring in exchange, William refuses to be caught out. But offers of food, a pet, even hidden treasure are very hard to refuse . . . This tousle-headed, snub-nosed, hearty, lovable imp of mischief has been harassing his unfortunate family and delighting his admirers since 1922.
In 1971, my family of four left the bustle of the city for the suburbs of Long Island where we discovered the world of garage sales and flea markets. Before long we were a part of the action, creating "Happy Days," a 30-year family business entailing the buying and selling of antique and collectible toys. We never thought that our middle class suburban family would traverse the United States and the globe encountering humorous and surprising situations wherever we went. After all, who would suspect that something as innocent as selling children's playthings would lead to dealing with mobsters, actors, dreamers, schemers and at least one murderer?!

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