In Happy Days, Samuel Beckett pursues his relentless search for the meaning of existence, probing the tenuous relationships that bind one person to another, and each to the universe, top time past and time present. Once again, stripping theater to its barest essentials, Happy Days offers only two characters: Winnie, a woman of about fifty, and Willie, a man of about sixty. In the first act Winnie is buried up to her waist in a mound of earth, but still has the use of her arms and few earthly possessions—toothbrush, tube of toothpaste, small mirror, revolver, handkerchief, spectacles; in the second act she is embedded up to her neck and can move only her eyes. Willie lives and moves—on all fours—behind the mound, appearing intermittently and replying only occasionally into Winnie’s long monologue, but the knowledge of his presence is a source of comfort and inspiration to her, and doubtless the prerequisite for all her “happy days.”
"This true tale of a Hollywood childhood, a fairytale role in one of television's all-time most popular shows, and a journey to dynamic and radiant health through a living-foods diet reveals author Cathy Silvers to be as enthusiastic an advocate of healthy living as "Jenny Piccolo" was boy-crazy"--Provided by publisher.
Sang Chun, a Korean orphan boy, and his friends play and work together to help their teacher build a school. Grades 5-7.
In the 21st century, why do we keep talking about the fifties and sixties? In "Happy Days and Wonder Years", Daniel Marcus reveals how interpretations of these decades have figured in the cultural politics of the United States since 1970.
Olly Murs invites you behind the scenes in his official illustrated autobiography filled with hundreds of brand new and exclusive photos. 'My life has been a non-stop roller-coaster of extreme emotions, crazy days, unexpected highs and yet my life hasn't been without its low points too. I've tried to imagine myself sitting down with you explaining what I was thinking and feeling during those times. I hope this book will give you a behind-the-scenes view of my journey into a place where I finally found what had been missing in my life for all those years: music.' Endearingly written with disarming honesty and filled with exclusive new and unseen photographs on and offstage, Happy Days takes you closer to Olly than you've ever been before.
Though best known for his caustic newspaper columns, H. L. Mencken's most enduring contribution to American literature may be his autobiographical writings, most of which first appeared in the New Yorker. In Happy Days, Mencken recalls memories of a safe and happy boyhood in the Baltimore of the 1880s and celebrates a way of life that he saw swiftly changing—from a time of straw hats and buggy rides to locomotives and bread lines.
A black comedy about a thirtysomething man on the verge of a nervous breakdown follows too-young Antoine--a death obsessed man--into a "rest home" five years shy of forty where he befriends an Alzheimer's patient named Al and is constantly seduced by the nurses caring for him. Original.
Even happy days come to an end. In this remarkable collection, Cressida Connolly explores the lives of children and young people who find themselves split in two. A conversation on a trip to the zoo heralds the end of a family; a boy watches his father fold Aunt Rose into his arms and loses his vocation; a young girl grows jealous of the attention paid to her dying sister. Examining familiar emotions--love, loss, jealousy, loneliness--with a fresh eye, The Happiest Days is an exciting, original, startling debut.
As human beings, we search for the same thing our entire lives: happiness. There are many paths to this elusive and precious destination. But once attained, some joys last, while others wither quickly. What are the secrets to finding-and keeping-lifelong happiness? Do these secrets even exist? Do you search for true happiness? Within these ancient practices, you can discover tools to help you become the cocreator of your destiny. Do you search for your perfect soul mate? Finding this person isn't hard at all, once you understand how universal energy truly works. Do you search for financial stability? The key to this treasure is well within reach-with the right education and some hard work. We all have the power to turn our dreams into reality; this guide, packed with ancient theories and backed by modern science about the power of mind energy, can help you do so. The power of Feng Shui is immeasurable; it can change your life. By living in harmony with the universal Chi, you can shape your destiny. You'll learn how Feng Shui's potent secret formulas can be used to create your new destiny. Are you ready for happiness beyond anything you could have imagined? Feng Shui beyond Boundaries can show you the path; it's time to take that first step on your journey to a new life.
Acclaimed 60 Minutes commentator and true-crime author Shana Alexander turns her journalist’s eye to her own unconventional family—and herself—in this fascinating, moving memoir Shana Alexander spent most of her life trying to figure out her enigmatic parents. Milton Ager was a famous songwriter whose creations included “Ain’t She Sweet” and “Happy Days Are Here Again.” Cecelia Ager was a film critic and Variety columnist. They were a glamorous Jazz Age couple that moved in charmed circles with George and Ira Gershwin, Dorothy Parker, and Jerome Kern. They remained together for fifty-seven years, and yet they lived separate lives. This wise, witty, unflinchingly candid memoir is also a revealing account of Alexander’s own life, from her successful career as a writer and national-news commentator to her troubled marriages and emotionally wrenching love affairs. She shares insights about growing up with a cold, hypercritical mother, her relationship with her younger sister, the suicide of her adopted daughter, and her reconciliation with her parents after a twenty-year estrangement. “I had to do a lot of detective work to uncover the truth about my parents’ lives,” Alexander said. “I knew almost nothing about them as people. But by the end they really did become my best friends.”
Everyone's favourite troublemaker, William Brown, is back in a hilarious collection of classic Just William stories - now with a brand new cover-look illustrated by Steven Lenton. When William's mother offers him a birthday party, he is suspicious - what's the catch? Convinced that he will have to do something boring in exchange, William refuses to be caught out. But offers of food, a pet, even hidden treasure are very hard to refuse . . . This tousle-headed, snub-nosed, hearty, lovable imp of mischief has been harassing his unfortunate family and delighting his admirers since 1922.
Everybody recognises the Grump, everybody knows a grump. And maybe there's a little grump in every one of us . . . The Grump, at eighty years old, is more focused on death than life; building his own coffin and keen to write his will in ink - who can trust technology, after all? - he knows that everything was much better in the old days. But when the Grump finds himself in hospital in a semi-conscious state after falling down his basement steps, his life passes before his eyes. Thinking of the people closest to him and reflecting on the changes society has brought about, he realises he must come to terms with the cards life has dealt him. With wry humour and sharp observations on family and relationships, The Happy Days of the Grump is a black comedy, sure to bring a smile to the face of even the grumpiest among us.
In Happy Days Were Here Again, William F. Buckley Jr. offers a collection of his finest essays from the latter part of his long career. Sometimes celebrating, sometimes assailing, Buckley takes on opponents ranging from Mikhail Gorbachev to Carl Sagan to Leonard Bernstein; reflects on the academic scene, the Gulf War, and the idea of sin; and offers appreciations of friends, both right and left. For everyone who appreciates the wit and style of America's pre-eminent conservative, this is a must-have collection.
A key question for U.S. policymakers is whether the recent strength in federal revenue is likely to continue. This question is addressed through an econometric analysis of the determinants of tax revenue, using time series that are adjusted for tax policy changes. The results suggest that growth in corporate profits and capital gains each contributed forty percent of the increase in the revenue-to-GDP ratio from 2004-2006, and rising income inequality explains much of the rest. While part of the revenue rise is the result of structural changes taking place in the U.S. economy, some of the recent buoyancy is likely to prove temporary, reflecting the highly cyclical nature of these variables.

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