For Readers of Ray Kurzweil and Michio Kaku, a New Look at the Cutting Edge of Artificial Intelligence Imagine a robotic stuffed animal that can read and respond to a child’s emotional state, a commercial that can recognize and change based on a customer’s facial expression, or a company that can actually create feelings as though a person were experiencing them naturally. Heart of the Machine explores the next giant step in the relationship between humans and technology: the ability of computers to recognize, respond to, and even replicate emotions. Computers have long been integral to our lives, and their advances continue at an exponential rate. Many believe that artificial intelligence equal or superior to human intelligence will happen in the not-too-distance future; some even think machine consciousness will follow. Futurist Richard Yonck argues that emotion, the first, most basic, and most natural form of communication, is at the heart of how we will soon work with and use computers. Instilling emotions into computers is the next leap in our centuries-old obsession with creating machines that replicate humans. But for every benefit this progress may bring to our lives, there is a possible pitfall. Emotion recognition could lead to advanced surveillance, and the same technology that can manipulate our feelings could become a method of mass control. And, as shown in movies like Her and Ex Machina, our society already holds a deep-seated anxiety about what might happen if machines could actually feel and break free from our control. Heart of the Machine is an exploration of the new and inevitable ways in which mankind and technology will interact.
Die Nobelpreis-Schmiede Massachusetts Institute of Technology ist der bedeutendste technologische Think Tank der USA. Dort arbeitet Professor Max Tegmark mit den weltweit führenden Entwicklern künstlicher Intelligenz zusammen, die ihm exklusive Einblicke in ihre Labors gewähren. Die Erkenntnisse, die er daraus zieht, sind atemberaubend und zutiefst verstörend zugleich. Neigt sich die Ära der Menschen dem Ende zu? Der Physikprofessor Max Tegmark zeigt anhand der neusten Forschung, was die Menschheit erwartet. Hier eine Auswahl möglicher Szenarien: - Eroberer: Künstliche Intelligenz übernimmt die Macht und entledigt sich der Menschheit mit Methoden, die wir noch nicht einmal verstehen. - Der versklavte Gott: Die Menschen bemächtigen sich einer superintelligenten künstlichen Intelligenz und nutzen sie, um Hochtechnologien herzustellen. - Umkehr: Der technologische Fortschritt wird radikal unterbunden und wir kehren zu einer prä-technologischen Gesellschaft im Stil der Amish zurück. - Selbstzerstörung: Superintelligenz wird nicht erreicht, weil sich die Menschheit vorher nuklear oder anders selbst vernichtet. - Egalitäres Utopia: Es gibt weder Superintelligenz noch Besitz, Menschen und kybernetische Organismen existieren friedlich nebeneinander. Max Tegmark bietet kluge und fundierte Zukunftsszenarien basierend auf seinen exklusiven Einblicken in die aktuelle Forschung zur künstlichen Intelligenz.
Der weltberühmte Poet Robert Gu wäre beinahe an Alzheimer gestorben und hat dabei zwanzig Jahre Fortschritt verpasst. Jetzt kommt er im Jahr 2025 mit wiederhergestelltem Verstand und Körper in San Diego zu sich und ist von der Realität schockiert. Bücher sind so gut wie ausgestorben. Computer wurden mittlerweile durch "intelligente" Kontaktlinsen ersetzt, die ihn beinahe an jedem Ort mit dem Internet verbinden können. Selbst er hat sich verändert. Er ist fünfundsiebzig, sieht jedoch fast wie ein Teenager aus. Und das ist nur die Spitze des Eisbergs des neuen Digitalen Zeitalters. Während Gu versucht, mit seiner Zukunft zurechtzukommen, zerrt ein Fremder ihn und andere Unschuldige in eine Verschwörung, die katastrophale Konsequenzen nach sich ziehen könnte ...
Looking for ways to handle the transition to a digital economy Robots, artificial intelligence, and driverless cars are no longer things of the distant future. They are with us today and will become increasingly common in coming years, along with virtual reality and digital personal assistants. As these tools advance deeper into everyday use, they raise the question—how will they transform society, the economy, and politics? If companies need fewer workers due to automation and robotics, what happens to those who once held those jobs and don't have the skills for new jobs? And since many social benefits are delivered through jobs, how are people outside the workforce for a lengthy period of time going to earn a living and get health care and social benefits? Looking past today's headlines, political scientist and cultural observer Darrell M. West argues that society needs to rethink the concept of jobs, reconfigure the social contract, move toward a system of lifetime learning, and develop a new kind of politics that can deal with economic dislocations. With the U.S. governance system in shambles because of political polarization and hyper-partisanship, dealing creatively with the transition to a fully digital economy will vex political leaders and complicate the adoption of remedies that could ease the transition pain. It is imperative that we make major adjustments in how we think about work and the social contract in order to prevent society from spiraling out of control. This book presents a number of proposals to help people deal with the transition from an industrial to a digital economy. We must broaden the concept of employment to include volunteering and parenting and pay greater attention to the opportunities for leisure time. New forms of identity will be possible when the "job" no longer defines people's sense of personal meaning, and they engage in a broader range of activities. Workers will need help throughout their lifetimes to acquire new skills and develop new job capabilities. Political reforms will be necessary to reduce polarization and restore civility so there can be open and healthy debate about where responsibility lies for economic well-being. This book is an important contribution to a discussion about tomorrow—one that needs to take place today.
In seinem Kultbuch „Eine kurze Geschichte der Menschheit“ erklärte Yuval Noah Harari, wie unsere Spezies die Erde erobern konnte. In „Homo Deus“ stößt er vor in eine noch verborgene Welt: die Zukunft. Was wird mit uns und unserem Planeten passieren, wenn die neuen Technologien dem Menschen gottgleiche Fähigkeiten verleihen – schöpferische wie zerstörerische – und das Leben selbst auf eine völlig neue Stufe der Evolution heben? Wie wird es dem Homo Sapiens ergehen, wenn er einen technikverstärkten Homo Deus erschafft, der sich vom heutigen Menschen deutlicher unterscheidet als dieser vom Neandertaler? Was bleibt von uns und der modernen Religion des Humanismus, wenn wir Maschinen konstruieren, die alles besser können als wir? In unserer Gier nach Gesundheit, Glück und Macht könnten wir uns ganz allmählich so weit verändern, bis wir schließlich keine Menschen mehr sind.
A provocative attempt to think about what was previously considered unthinkable: a serious philosophical case for the rights of robots. We are in the midst of a robot invasion, as devices of different configurations and capabilities slowly but surely come to take up increasingly important positions in everyday social reality—self-driving vehicles, recommendation algorithms, machine learning decision making systems, and social robots of various forms and functions. Although considerable attention has already been devoted to the subject of robots and responsibility, the question concerning the social status of these artifacts has been largely overlooked. In this book, David Gunkel offers a provocative attempt to think about what has been previously regarded as unthinkable: whether and to what extent robots and other technological artifacts of our own making can and should have any claim to moral and legal standing. In his analysis, Gunkel invokes the philosophical distinction (developed by David Hume) between “is” and “ought” in order to evaluate and analyze the different arguments regarding the question of robot rights. In the course of his examination, Gunkel finds that none of the existing positions or proposals hold up under scrutiny. In response to this, he then offers an innovative alternative proposal that effectively flips the script on the is/ought problem by introducing another, altogether different way to conceptualize the social situation of robots and the opportunities and challenges they present to existing moral and legal systems.
This book combines insights from the humanities and modern neuroscience to explore the contribution of affect and embodiment on meaning-making in case studies from animation, video games, and virtual worlds. As we interact more and more with animated characters and avatars in everyday media consumption, it has become vital to investigate the ways that animated environments influence our perception of the liberal humanist subject. This book is the first to apply recent research on the application of the embodied mind thesis to our understanding of embodied engagement with nonhumans and cyborgs in animated media, analyzing works by Émile Cohl, Hayao Miyazaki, Tim Burton, Norman McLaren, the Quay Brothers, Pixar, and many others. Drawing on the breakthroughs of modern brain science to argue that animated media broadens the viewer’s perceptual reach, this title offers a welcome contribution to the growing literature at the intersection of cognitive studies and film studies, with a perspective on animation that is new and original. ‘Affect and Embodied Meaning in Animation’ will be essential reading for researchers of Animation Studies, Film and Media Theory, Posthumanism, Video Games, and Digital Culture, and will provide a key insight into animation for both undergraduate and graduate students. Because of the increasing importance of visual effect cinema and video games, the book will also be of keen interest within Film Studies and Media Studies, as well as to general readers interested in scholarship in animated media.
The professional landscape is transforming, and the only way to maintain competitive advantage is to maximize the unique skills of your workforce. In Humanity Works, bestselling author, global workplace consultant and futurist Alexandra Levit provides a guide to making the most of the human traits of creativity, judgement, problem solving and interpersonal sensitivity. Revealing what the 'robot takeover' will really look like, how talent and machines can work side by side and how you can make organizational structures more agile and innovation focused, this book will prepare you to lead organizations of the future. Humanity Works doesn't just explain the fascinating trends of the future of work; it condenses cutting-edge academic and business thinking to show what you can do about the future right now. Original, real-life case studies including Nestle, The Washington Post, Deloitte, and Pepsi combined with exercises and workplace tools will equip you for staying innovative and successful in the wake of major workplace disruption. Everything hinges on capturing the human edge in your organization.
Das Jahr 2045 markiert einen historischen Meilenstein: Es ist das Jahr, in dem der Mensch seine biologischen Begrenzungen mithilfe der Technik überwinden wird. Diese als technologische Singularität bekannt gewordene Revolution wird die Menschheit für immer verändern. Googles Chefingenieur Ray Kurzweil, dessen wahnwitzigen Visionen in den vergangenen Jahrzehnten immer wieder genau ins Schwarze trafen, zeichnet in diesem Klassiker des Transhumanismus mit beispielloser Detailwut eine bunt schillernde Momentaufnahme der technischen Evolution und legt dar, weshalb diese so bald kein Ende finden, sondern im Gegenteil immer weiter an Dynamik gewinnen wird. Daraus ergibt sich eine ebenso faszinierende wie schockierende Vision für die Zukunft der Menschheit.
Die beste Suchmaschine ist unser Geist Seit 2007 bietet Google seinen Mitarbeitern ein Programm für persönliches Wachstum an: »Search inside yourself«. Den Anstoß dazu gab Chade-Meng Tan, ein Google-Ingenieur, der diesen Acht-Wochen-Kurs zusammen mit renommierten Wissenschaftlern wie Jon Kabat-Zinn und Daniel Goleman entwickelte. »Search inside yourself« bietet ein Achtsamkeitstraining, um emotionale Intelligenz zu erlernen, mit dem Ziel, zufriedener, gelassener, kreativer und schließlich auch erfolgreicher zu werden. Es umfasst Übungen und Meditationen, um die Konzentration zu verbessern, die Selbstwahrnehmung zu erhöhen und nützliche mentale Gewohnheiten zu entwickeln. Bei Google ist dieses Trainingsprogramm äußerst beliebt und nachgefragt. Chade-Meng Tan macht es nun erstmals öffentlich zugänglich. Mit Leichtigkeit und Witz, und dabei stets wissenschaftlich fundiert (er ist ja Ingenieur!) zeigt er einen etwas anderen, jedoch sehr vielversprechenden Weg zu Kreativität und Lebensglück. Und wenn das bei Google funktioniert – warum nicht auch bei uns?
Unmerklich drängt sich intelligente Software immer tiefer in Aufgaben, die früher menschlichen Spitzenkräften vorbehalten waren. Künstliche Intelligenz ist das "Next Big Thing". Täglich übertragen wir intelligenten Programmen immer mehr Verantwortung für Stadtplanung und Energieversorgung, für die Sicherung von Nahrungsversorgung und Naturressourcen. Was aber passiert, wenn wir ein intelligentes Wesen kreieren, das dem Menschen weit überlegen ist? Bei der Umsetzung vorprogrammierter Ziele könnte eine Computer-Intelligenz den Menschen als Störfaktor sehen – und dementsprechend handeln ...Heute wird unser Leben von künstlicher Intelligenz erleichtert. In wenigen Jahren wird sie weite Teile unseres Lebens kontrollieren. Und die Macht haben, uns zu vernichten. Die Chancen für die Menschheit stehen ziemlich schlecht ... Zwei Top-Journalisten gehen diesem spannenden Thema auf den Grund.
Eine leidenschaftliche Antithese zum üblichen Kulturpessimismus und ein engagierter Widerspruch zu dem weitverbreiteten Gefühl, dass die Moderne dem Untergang geweiht ist. Hass, Populismus und Unvernunft regieren die Welt, Wissenschaftsfeindlichkeit macht sich breit, Wahrheit gibt es nicht mehr: Wer die Schlagzeilen von heute liest, könnte so denken. Doch Bestseller-Autor Steven Pinker zeigt, dass das grundfalsch ist. Er hat die Entwicklung der vergangenen Jahrhunderte gründlich untersucht und beweist in seiner fulminanten Studie, dass unser Leben stetig viel besser geworden ist. Heute leben wir länger, gesünder, sicherer, glücklicher, friedlicher und wohlhabender denn je, und nicht nur in der westlichen Welt. Der Grund: die Aufklärung und ihr Wertesystem. Denn Aufklärung und Wissenschaft bieten nach wie vor die Basis, um mit Vernunft und im Konsens alle Probleme anzugehen. Anstelle von Gerüchten zählen Fakten, anstatt überlieferten Mythen zu glauben baut man auf Diskussion und Argumente. Anschaulich und brillant macht Pinker eines klar: Vernunft, Wissenschaft, Humanismus und Fortschritt sind weiterhin unverzichtbar für unser Wohlergehen. Ohne sie wird die Welt auf keinen Fall zu einem besseren Ort für uns alle. »Mein absolutes Lieblingsbuch aller Zeiten.« Bill Gates
Der Wettlauf um das Gehirn hat begonnen. Sowohl die EU als auch die USA haben gewaltige Forschungsprojekte ins Leben gerufen um das Geheimnis des menschlichen Denkens zu entschlüsseln. 2023 soll es dann soweit sein: Das menschliche Gehirn kann vollständig simuliert werden. In "Das Geheimnis des menschlichen Denkens" gewährt Googles Chefingenieur Ray Kurzweil einen spannenden Einblick in das Reverse Engineering des Gehirns. Er legt dar, wie mithilfe der Mustererkennungstheorie des Geistes der ungeheuren Komplexität des Gehirns beizukommen ist und wirft einen ebenso präzisen wie überraschenden Blick auf die am Horizont sich bereits abzeichnende Zukunft. Ist das menschliche Gehirn erst einmal simuliert, wird künstliche Intelligenz die Fähigkeiten des Menschen schon bald übertreffen. Ein Ereignis, das Kurzweil aufgrund der bereits in "Menschheit 2.0" entworfenen exponentiellen Wachstumskurve der Informationstechnologien bereits für das Jahr 2029 prognostiziert. Aber was dann? Kurzweil ist zuversichtlich, dass die Vorteile künstlicher Intelligenz mögliche Bedrohungsszenarien überwiegen und sie uns entscheidend dabei hilft, uns weiterzuentwickeln und die Herausforderungen der Zukunft zu meistern.
Die Arbeit hat sich im letzten Jahrzehnt weiter verändert. Bereits in 50 Jahren werden weniger als 10 Prozent der Bevölkerung ausreichen, um alle Güter und Dienstleistungen bereitzustellen. Die Konsequenzen für die sozialen Sicherungssysteme sind dramatisch, soziale Konlikte scheinen unvermeidlich. Dass "es nicht mehr genug Arbeit für alle geben wird" erkannte Jeremy Rifkin bereits in seinem Weltbesteller Das Ende der Arbeit - und seine Thesen sind heute aktueller denn je. In der Neuausgabe des in 16 Sprachen übersetzten Bestsellers entwickelt Rifkin seine radikalen Vorschläge weiter und zeigt mit gewohntem wirtschaftlichen und politischen Sachverstand, wie wir verhindern können, dass uns die Arbeit ausgeht. "Rifkins Buch wird uns noch lange beschäftigen." Süddeutsche Zeitung
Computer sind mittlerweile so intelligent geworden, dass die nächste industrielle Revolution unmittelbar bevorsteht. Wer profitiert, wer verliert? Antworten auf diese Fragen bietet das neue Buch der Technologie-Profis Erik Brynjolfsson und Andrew McAfee. Seit Jahren arbeiten wir mit Computern - und Computer für uns. Mittlerweile sind die Maschinen so intelligent geworden, dass sie zu Leistungen fähig sind, die vor Kurzem noch undenkbar waren: Sie fahren Auto, sie schreiben eigene Texte - und sie besiegen Großmeister im Schach. Dieser Entwicklungssprung ist nur der Anfang. In ihrem neuen Buch zeigen zwei renommierte Professoren, welch atemberaubende Entwicklungen uns noch bevorstehen: Die zweite industrielle Revolution kommt! Welche Auswirkungen wird das haben? Welche Chancen winken, welche Risiken drohen? Was geschieht dabei mit den Menschen, was mit der Umwelt? Und was werden Gesellschaft und Politik tun, um die Auswirkungen dieser "neuen digitalen Intelligenz" für alle bestmöglich zu gestalten? Dieses Buch nimmt Sie mit auf eine Reise in eine Zukunft, die schon längst begonnen hat.
Alice sitzt gelangweilt vor dem Fernseher; da fällt ihr Blick auf "Alice im Wunderland", das sie kürzlich gelesen hat. Sie sehnt sich danach, vergleichbare Abenteuer zu erleben, stürzt und fällt in Ohnmacht. In ihrem Traum fällt sie durch den Bildschirm hindurch, wo sie - verkleinert - auf die Elektronen trifft, die als Strahl den Bildschirm zum Leuchten bringen. Das ist erst der Anfang der Geschichte, in der Alice nach und nach die Besonderheiten der Quantenwelt kennenlernt. Sie begegnet Menschen wie Niels Bohr, die sie unter ihre Fittiche nehmen, und steht mit Elektronen und Quarks auf du und du. In dieser neuen Form der Geschichte von Alice beschreibt Robert Gilmore - selbst angesehener Physiker - kenntnisreich und amüsant, welche Besonderheiten uns die Welt der Elektronen und Quarks bietet. Schließlich wird Alice (und damit den Lesern) klargemacht, daß nach 70 Jahren der Forschung auf diesem Gebiet ungelöste Fragen an die Grundlagen der Quantentheorie übriggeblieben sind, die vielleicht nie gelöst werden können. Rezension erschienen in: junge wissenschaft Ausgabe / Band 12Jg., Heft 45, S. 60f Feb. 97 (...) ist es dem Autor in hervorragender Weise gelungen, eine didaktisch äußerst wertvolle Darstellung der Quantenmechanik zu präsentieren(...) (...)erreicht damit einen wesentlich größerenLeserkreis(...) (...)sehr abgerundetes Bild der Quantenphysik(...) (...)in sehr geschickter Weise(...) (...)in sehr prägnanter Form, jedoch in fachlicher Hinsicht völlig korrekt(...) (...)Als besonders gelungen darf man die Übersetzung aus dem englischen Original bezeichnen(...) (...)Sehr lobenswert erwähnt werden muß wohl auch die vom deutschen Übersetzer vorgenommene Aktualisierung beim inzwischen gelungenen Nachweis des top-Quark am Fermilab(...) (...)Der rezensent ist davon überzeugt, daß auch der versierte Physiker dieses Buch mit großem Genuß lesen muß(...)
Maschinelles Lernen heißt, Computer so zu programmieren, dass ein bestimmtes Leistungskriterium anhand von Beispieldaten und Erfahrungswerten aus der Vergangenheit optimiert wird. Das vorliegende Buch diskutiert diverse Methoden, die ihre Grundlagen in verschiedenen Themenfeldern haben: Statistik, Mustererkennung, neuronale Netze, Künstliche Intelligenz, Signalverarbeitung, Steuerung und Data Mining. In der Vergangenheit verfolgten Forscher verschiedene Wege mit unterschiedlichen Schwerpunkten. Das Anliegen dieses Buches ist es, all diese unterschiedlichen Ansätze zu kombinieren, um eine allumfassende Behandlung der Probleme und ihrer vorgeschlagenen Lösungen zu geben.
Sicherheitsethik ist ein neues Feld. Der vorliegende Band ist der erste, der sich mit diesen Fragen systematisch befasst. Die Notwendigkeit einer Sicherheitsethik entstand aus der Tatsache, dass ‚Sicherheit’ in den unterschiedlichsten gesellschaftlichen Bereichen zu einem Leitmotiv geworden ist. Dieses Leitmotiv nimmt im persönlichen wie auch dem gesellschaftlichen Leben mittlerweile die Form eines grundlegenden Werts an. Welche Folgen und Implikationen unterschiedliche Verständnisse von Sicherheit haben; wie das Zusammenspiel von Kontexten und Sicherheitsbegriffen gestaltet ist, wie Formen der politischen, gesellschaftlichen, persönlichen und technologischen Herstellung von Sicherheit zu verstehen und zu bewerten sind, welche Menschen in welcher Weise von welcher Form von Sicherheit profitieren, eingeschränkt oder sogar beschädigt werden – dies sind nur einige wenige Fragen im Kontext einer Sicherheitsethik.

Best Books