A History of Riots is the result of a conference held by the London Socialist Historians Group in early 2012, designed to look again at the historical aspects of riots in the wake of the August 2011 riots in the UK. Many historians had thought that riots were a method of protest and revolt which had given way to more organised forms of expression, from trade unions to political parties, during the course of the nineteenth century. Events have proven this idea to be incorrect. Riots still take place around the world on a regular basis. The contributors to A History of Riots probe various aspects of riots in order to examine the historical issues and concerns that motivate them and dictate their course and to better understand why they take place in the current day. Sean Creighton looks at the Trafalgar Square riots in London in 1887, referred to as Bloody Sunday . Ian Birchall analyses how riots have been represented in fiction, while Neil Davidson reviews riotous activity around the Scottish Act of Union in 1707. Keith Flett looks at what is sometimes held to be the peak of British riot history, the Chartist period of the 1840s, while John Newsinger offers a different perspective: not a riot inspired by the crowd or the mob, as media commentators persist in naming protesters, but one driven by authority, a police riot in the US in the 1930s. There are editorial introductions and conclusions that place these specific historical studies of aspects of the history of riots in a wider methodological and theoretical framework, looking at the work of some of the foremost historians of riots, including George Rude, and more recent material by Adrian Randall, Andrew Charlesworth and others. The perspective of the book is clear. Riots are something which is an important part of history, but they also remain part of the present too. In this sense, understanding their history is an important task for historians and all those interested in how, and in what forms, protest develops. This book represents a contribution to, and promotes, a discussion of both the history of riots and how an examination of this can help provide a better understanding of riots today."
This book examines how movements from below pose challenges to the status quo. The 2010s have seen an explosion of protest movements, sometimes characterised as riots by governments and the media. But these are not new phenomena, rather reflecting thousands of years of conflict between different social classes. Beginning with struggles for democracy and control of the state in Athens and ancient Rome, this book traces the common threads of resistance through the Middle Ages in Europe and into the modern age. As classes change so does the composition of the protestors and the goals of their movements; the one common factor being how groups can mobilise to resist unbearable oppression, thereby developing a crowd consciousness that widens their political horizons and demonstrates the possibility of overthrowing the existing order. To appreciate the roots and motivations of these so-called deviants the author argues that we need to listen to the sound of the crowd. This book will be of interest to researchers of social movements, protests and riots across sociology, history and international relations.
Newark’s volatile past is infamous. The city has become synonymous with the Black Power movement and urban crisis. Its history reveals a vibrant and contentious political culture punctuated by traditional civic pride and an understudied tradition of protest in the black community. Newark charts this important city's place in the nation, from its founding in 1666 by a dissident Puritan as a refuge from intolerance, through the days of Jim Crow and World War II civil rights activism, to the height of postwar integration and the election of its first black mayor. In this broad and balanced history of Newark, Kevin Mumford applies the concept of the public sphere to the problem of race relations, demonstrating how political ideas and print culture were instrumental in shaping African American consciousness. He draws on both public and personal archives, interpreting official documents—such as newspapers, commission testimony, and government records—alongside interviews, political flyers, meeting minutes, and rare photos. From the migration out of the South to the rise of public housing and ethnic conflict, Newark explains the impact of African Americans on the reconstruction of American cities in the twentieth century.
"... a sweeping, analytical synethsis of collective violence from the colonial experience to the present." —American Studies "Gilje has written 'the book' on rioting throughout American history." —The Historian "... a thorough, illuminating, and at times harrowing account of man's inhumanity to man." —William and Mary Quarterly "... fulfills its title's promise as an encyclopedic study... an impressive accomplishment and required reading for anyone interested in America's contentious past." —Journal of the Early Republic "Gilje has written a thought-provoking survey of the social context of American riots and popular disorders from the Colonial period to the late 20th century.... a must read for anyone interested in riots." —Choice In this wide-ranging survey of rioting in America, Paul A. Gilje argues that we cannot fully comprehend the history of the United States without an understanding of the impact of rioting. Exploring the rationale of the American mob brings to light the grievances that motivate its behavior and the historical circumstances that drive the choices it makes. Gilje's unusual lens makes for an eye-opening view of the American people and their history.
"Reading the Riot Act" is a phrase that has entered the popular lexicon, meaning the action taken by authority figures when they perceive that their "charges" are getting out of hand. The act itself is a seldom-used piece of legislation actually designed to prevent a riot from taking place. Supposedly, the mere mention of the Riot Act is enough to bring hardened miscreants bent on destruction to their collective senses. But if a riot has started, it's already too late to read the Riot Act. Every city has its distinct history of rioting-the Rocket Richard riots in Montreal, the Christie Pits riot in Toronto, the Winnipeg and Regina riots, even the Shakespeare riots in New York where rival factions rioted over which actor was the better interpreter of Shakespeare's work. 'Reading the Riot Act' is a popular history that rereads and rewrites the legacy of riots in Vancouver. The project was conceived following the city's Stanley Cup riots in 1994, when official reports and media coverage differed significantly from eyewitness accounts. Later, media reports on the APEC riots downplayed and obscured certain facets of the conflict. Seeking out sources beyond the official reports, Barnholden has compiled a record of participants and observers, allowing the "vanquished" to have their say. Barnholden shuns the simplistic "bad apple" explanation, and explores the deeper economic causes and effects of riots."This book contains some stirring narrative of conflicts that have defined the history of Vancouver." - Prairie Fire
Chronic Hindu-Muslim rioting in India has created a situation in which communal violence is both so normal and so varied in its manifestations that it would seem to defy effective analysis. In this volume, Paul R. Brass, one of the world’s preeminent experts on South Asia, reports the results of an immense scholarly undertaking: his tracking of more than half a century’s riots in the north Indian city of Aligarh, where he has conducted extraordinary research for the past thirty-eight years.
No topic has been discussed at greater length or with more vigor than the racial confrontations of the 1960s. Events of these years left behind hundreds dead; thousands injured and arrested, property damage beyond toll, and a population both outraged and conscience stricken. Researchers have offered a variety of explanations for this largely urban violence. Although many Americans reacted as if the violence was a new phenomenon, it was not. Racial Violence in the United States places the events of the 1960s into historical perspective. The book includes accounts of racial violence from different periods in American history, showing these disturbing events in their historical context and providing suggestive analyses of their social, psychological, and political causes and implications.Grimshaw includes reports and studies of racial violence from the slave insurrections of the seventeenth century to urban disturbances of the 1960s. The result is more than a descriptive record. Its contents not only demonstrate the historical nature of the problem but also provide a review of major theoretical points of view. The volume defines patterns in past and present disturbances, isolates empirical generalizations, and samples the substantial body of literature that has attempted to explain this ultimate form ofsocial conflict. It includes selections on the characteristics of rioters, on the ecology of riots, and on the role of law in urban violence, as well as theoretical interpretations developed by psychologists, sociologists, political scientists, and other observers. The resulting volume will help interested readers better understand the violence that accompanied the attempts of black Americans to gain for themselves full equality.
Sechs Tage im Jahr 1992. Polizisten misshandeln einen schwarzen Bürger und Los Angeles explodiert. Plünderungen, überall brennt es; ein Bürgerkrieg mitten im Herzen der westlichen Welt. Was passiert, wenn die Polizei eine Stadt den Armeen der Gangs überlässt? Rechnungen werden beglichen noch und noch. Davon erzählt dieser ungeheuerliche Roman. Am Anfang ein unmenschlicher Mord: Wir erleben ihn aus der Sicht des Opfers. Dann kommen andere zu Wort: skrupellose und weniger skrupellose Gangster, rassistische Polizisten, Krankenschwestern, Junkies, jugendliche Mitläufer. Und es entsteht das Bild einer Gesellschaft, in der der Stärkere den Schwächeren frisst und die sich im Ausnahmezustand gänzlich enthüllt. Ein Roman wie ein Tarantino-Film, ein Gewaltexzess, ein Experiment, ein Buch ohne Vorbild. «Eine monumentale Leistung: Gattis nimmt den Leser mit in das zerbrochene, wütende Herz von Los Angeles während der Unruhen von 1992 und blinzelt nicht einmal mit den Augen vor dem, was er da sieht.» (Dennis Lehane) «Ein symphonischer, unglaublich perfekter, unüberbietbarer Roman. Er hat mich in einem Stück verschluckt.» (David Mitchell) «Heftige, temporeiche, lebenspralle Szenen einer Stadt im Krieg. Dieser Autor weiß genau, wovon er schreibt.» (Joyce Carol Oates) «Das herzzerreißende Bild einer Stadt, die sich selbst zerstört.» (Paula Hawkins, Autorin von «Girl on the Train») «Ein wahnsinnig hochtouriger Roman: schmutzig, nervenzerfetzend, manchmal unerträglich gewaltsam, gleichzeitig aber auch erfüllt von einem tiefen Mitgefühl für seine Figuren.» (New York Times)
'He who contemplates the depths of Paris is seized with vertigo. Nothing is more fantastic. Nothing is more tragic. Nothing is more sublime.' ― Victor Hugo Think of Paris and you might picture romantic images of elegant boulevards, bohemian artists and café society. Those aren’t wrong, but the story of Paris is also a tale of riots and revolution, plagues and squalor, sieges, occupations and religious persecution. Ranging from ancient Gallic city conquered by the Romans to the 2015 terrorist attacks, Bloody History of Paris is a lively account of the political, military, social and cultural life of the capital. At times the largest city in Europe, Paris has been sacked by the Vikings, besieged by the Prussians and occupied by the Nazis; it has nurtured the artistic heights of Toulouse-Lautrec, Modigliani and Edith Piaf, but also witnessed their self-destructive lives. It has been the site of the Catholic massacre of Protestants in 1572, the execution of a king, and of thousands in religious and political conflicts. From Abelard and Héloïse to Joan of Arc, Coco Chanel to Princess Diana; from the Man in the Iron Mask to Marat, from Jacques Mesrine to Jim Morrison, the book takes a broad sweep over the more sinister moments in the city’s history. Expertly written and illustrated with 180 colour and black-&-white photographs, paintings and artworks, Bloody History of Paris tells the vibrant, unromantic tale of one of the world’s most romantic cities.
The translation of Nimura’s prize-winning book on the violent Ashio mine riot of 1907 and its effect on the labor movement in Japan in the years following.
Riot, Rebellion and Popular Politics in Early Modern England reassesses the relationship between politics, social change and popular culture in the period c. 1520-1730. It argues that early modern politics needs to be understood in broad terms, to include not only states and elites, but also disputes over the control of resources and the distribution of power. Andy Wood assesses the history of riot and rebellion in the early modern period, concentrating upon: popular involvement in religious change and political conflict, especially the Reformation and the English Revolution; relations between ruler and ruled; seditious speech; popular politics and the early modern state; custom, the law and popular politics; the impact of literacy and print; and the role of ritual, gender and local identity in popular politics.

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