Home Ground is a powerful and enduring collection of new writing from established authors, learners, students and tutors who have worked together in Glasgow. The stories and poems in this book are peppered with the landmarks, spaces and places that are emblems of our city. Most of all, they are about people; their hopes and fears, and their trials and triumphs.
When longtime author Robert Root moves to a small town in southeast Wisconsin, he gets to know his new home by walking the same terrain traveled by three Wisconsin luminaries who were deeply rooted in place—John Muir, Aldo Leopold, and August Derleth. Root walks with Muir at John Muir State Natural Area, with Leopold at the Shack, and with Derleth in Sac Prairie; closer to home, he traverses the Ice Age Trail, often guided by such figures as pioneering scientist Increase Lapham. Along the way, Root investigates the changes to the natural landscape over nearly two centuries, and he chronicles his own transition from someone on unfamiliar terrain to someone secure on his home ground.In prose that is at turns introspective and haunting, Walking Home Ground inspires us to see history’s echo all around us: the parking lot that once was forest; the city that once was glacier. "Perhaps this book is an invitation to walk home ground," Root tells us. "Perhaps, too, it’s a time capsule, a message in a bottle from someone given to looking over his shoulder even as he tries to examine the ground beneath his feet."
Home Ground and Foreign Territory is an original collection of essays on early Canadian literature in English. Aiming to be both provocative and scholarly, it encompasses a variety of (sometimes opposing) perspectives, subjects, and methods, with the aim of reassessing the field, unearthing neglected texts, and proposing new approaches to canonical authors. Renowned experts in early Canadian literary studies, including D.M.R. Bentley, Mary Jane Edwards, and Carole Gerson, join emerging scholars in a collection distinguished by its clarity of argument and breadth of reference. Together, the essays offer bold and informative contributions to the study of this dynamic literature. Home Ground and Foreign Territory reaches out far beyond the scope of early Canadian literature. Its multi-disciplinary approach innovates literal studies and appeals to literature specialists and general readership alike.
Published to great acclaim in 2006, the hardcover edition of Home Ground: Language for an American Landscape met with outstanding reviews and strong sales, going into three printings. A language-lover's dream, Home Ground revitalized a descriptive language for the American landscape by combining geography, literature, and folklore in one volume. Now in paperback, this visionary reference is available to an entire new segment of readers. Home Ground brings together 45 poets and writers to create more than 850 original definitions for words that describe our lands and waters. The writers draw from careful research and their own distinctive stylistic, personal, and regional diversity to portray in bright, precise prose the striking complexity of the landscapes we inhabit. Home Ground includes 100 black-and-white line drawings by Molly O’Halloran and an introductory essay by Barry Lopez.
Collection of short stories by a young Alaskan writer, examining the effects of pipeline construction on two families.
In poems that are as concentrated as pearls, Patricia Sykes explores various histories—her own, those of her forebears, and the wider histories of identity and place. Citing the intersection of three distinct philosophies with particular birds—the indigenous modewarre, the colonial biziura lobata, and the common Wathaurong musk duck—these poems set out on the winding paths of memory and aspiration, searching for answers to the questions What is home? and What is identity? Their context is local and universal, their voices are restless and insistent, their themes are as broad or as narrowly defined as the journey demands. Whether inquiring into the futuristic interventions of intra-uterine surgery, the soft and hard arguments of living outside of the placenta, or into the dispossessions of terrorism, these poems seek to confront and understand the complex meanings of belonging. Two of the included poems have received acclaim: "Modewarre—ways you might approach it" was highly commended in the Josephine Ulrick Poetry Prize, and "Sanctuary: Swan Lake, Phillip Island" won the Tom Collins Poetry Prize.
Despairing of her numbingly routine life, Rose McKenna abandons home, friends, and lover to join her brother Peter on his commune in Northern California only to find several disparate groups of people with little in common
This book explores why it is white ethnicity has been rendered invisible, arguing that contemporary people's conceptions of themselves are conditioned by, and derive from, the unknown and forgotten legacy of a colonial past that cannot be confined to the past.
The concept of African American home ground knits together diverse aspects of the American landscape, from elite suburbs and tower apartments to the old homeplaces of the countryside, to the tabletop array of family photos beside the bed of a housebound elder. This fascinating volume focuses on ways African Americans have invested actual and symbolic landscapes with signifigance, gained the means to acquire property, and brought new insight to the interpretation of contemporary, historical, and archaelogical sites. Keep Your Head to the Sky demonstrates how visions of home, past and present, have helped to shape African Americans' sense of place, often under extremely hostile conditions.
The MCG has hosted not only Test matches, Grand Finals and an Olympics, but evangelical crusades, concerts, conscription rallies, papal and royal visits and much more. Megan Ponsford's book of photographs foregrounds the northern side of the MCG, just before the wreckers moved in to commence a complete refurbishment.
n Home Ground Jeanne Lohmann celebrates her life with gratitude and zest, a wry sense of humor. The poems speak of the vagaries and wisdom of aging, the complex beauty of nature, memories of parents, friends and growing up. Through love and loss and change the work of these generous poems is an adventurous search for"home ground.” JeanneLohmann lives and writes inOlympia Washington. This is her tenth published poetry collection.
Like John Muir, David Pitt-Brooke stepped out for a walk one morning—a long walk of a thousand kilometres or more through the arid valleys of southern interior British Columbia. He went in search of beauty and lost grace in a landscape that has seen decades of development and upheaval. In Crossing Home Ground he reports back, providing a day-by-day account of his journey’s experiences, from the practical challenges—dealing with blisters, rain and dehydration—to sublime moments of discovery and reconnection with the natural world. Through the course of this journey, Pitt-Brooke’s encounters with the natural world generate starting points for reflections on larger issues: the delicate interconnections of a healthy landscape and, most especially, the increasingly fragile bond between human beings and their home-places. There is no escaping the impact of human beings on the natural world, not even in the most remote countryside, but he finds hope and consolation in surviving pockets of loveliness, the kindness of strangers and the transformative process of the walking itself, a personal pilgrimage across home ground. Crossing Home Ground is a book that, though rooted in one specific place and time, will evoke a universal sense of recognition in a wide variety of readers. It will appeal to hikers, natural-history enthusiasts and anyone who loves the wild countryside and is concerned about the disappearance of Canada’s natural spaces. Pitt-Brooke’s grassland odyssey is sure to become a classic of British Columbia nature writing.
Reading Don Gutteridge's collection of poetry, Home Ground, will instill a sense of wonder and presence with his well-hewn memories of Point Edward. Don's delight in crafting his poems, in making his images sing, spills over onto the page. The reader can't help but be affected on many levels. Home Ground reveals the bright tapestry that is the author's memories, his adventures as a child, his companions and family. If it is correct to say that a great poem aspires to include the mind, the body, the heart, the soul and the spirit in one surround, then one can affirm that this collection of poems, Home Ground, has indeed realized this truism. Don Gutteridge, a Canadian voice through and through, is a poet to be reckoned with. Home Ground, is considered to be one of the best of Don Gutteridge's almost 60 books. Gutteridge has a divine gift; he crafts visions with an elegant ease, splashing colors on canvas of the mind's eye. Home Ground recreates the past so vividly it argues for the concept of time standing still. Don Gutteridge is a master of his craft. He won the 1972 UWO President's Medal for the best periodical poem of that year. "Death At Quebec." His poetry collection Coppermine was short-listed for the 1973 Governor General's Literary Award. Now with this new collection of poems, Home Ground, he is destined to leave a permanent mark on the Canadian poetry scene. Don Gutteridge is arguably one of Canada's finest poets.
Sam's team are edging closer to the bottom of the league this season and team captain Jordan's bad attitude isn't helping anyone. When Sam spots Hasan playing on the refugee team, he can see that Hasan's got talent and invites him along to practice. Hasan and his friend Faisal prove to be exactly what the team need� but Jordan's not going to accept his new teammates so easily. Can Sam get the boys to pull together before it's too late?Packed with facts about football and refugee communities.
Essays deal with favorite plants, places where the author has lived and gardened, compost, cut flowers, and the seasons

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