This "How It's Done" series reveals insider hints, tips, and tricks from one of the world’s greatest comic creators in his own words. The artist behind juggernauts like Watchmen and The Green Lantern, Dave Gibbons is here to teach you scriptwriting, page layouts, lettering, cover designs, and more, and he’s doing it with scans of original artwork and rarely seen workings to illustrate his personal creative processes. How Comics Work covers both Gibbons' hand-drawn and digital design techniques in depth. An early adopter of computer design in comic creation, all his lettering is digital, and he even has his own 'hand-lettered' font. This is your chance to gain insight to Gibbons' digital work, from his computer coloring and 3D modelling with Angus McKie on Give Me Liberty, to his work on The Originals using digital greytones. You’ll learn how he layers text for editing, creates effects such as flares and neon glows, and prepares artwork for print and online.
This anthology explores tensions between the individualistic artistic ideals and the collective industrial realities of contemporary cultural production with eighteen all-new chapters presenting pioneering empirical research on the complexities and controversies of comics work. Art Spiegelman. Alan Moore. Osamu Tezuka. Neil Gaiman. Names such as these have become synonymous with the medium of comics. Meanwhile, the large numbers of people without whose collective action no comic book would ever exist in the first place are routinely overlooked. Cultures of Comics Work unveils this hidden, global industrial labor of writers, illustrators, graphic designers, letterers, editors, printers, typesetters, publicists, publishers, distributors, translators, retailers, and countless others both directly and indirectly involved in the creative production of what is commonly thought of as the comic book. Drawing upon diverse theoretical and methodological perspectives, an international and interdisciplinary cohort of cutting-edge researchers and practitioners intervenes in debates about cultural work and paves innovative directions for comics scholarship.
»Geschickt als ein leicht lesbarer Comic verkleidet, dekonstruiert Scott McClouds einfach gehaltener Band die geheime Sprache der Comics, während nebenbei Geheimnisse von Zeit, Raum, Kunst und Kosmos enthüllt werden. Der intelligenteste Comic, den ich seit langem gesehen habe. Bravo!« Art Spiegelman
This inaugural volume in the Graphic Medicine series establishes the principles of graphic medicine and begins to map the field. The volume combines scholarly essays by members of the editorial team with previously unpublished visual narratives by Ian Williams and MK Czerwiec, and it includes arresting visual work from a wide range of graphic medicine practitioners. The book’s first section, featuring essays by Scott Smith and Susan Squier, argues that as a new area of scholarship, research on graphic medicine has the potential to challenge the conventional boundaries of academic disciplines, raise questions about their foundations, and reinvigorate literary scholarship—and the notion of the literary text—for a broader audience. The second section, incorporating essays by Michael Green and Kimberly Myers, demonstrates that graphic medicine narratives can engage members of the health professions with literary and visual representations and symbolic practices that offer patients, family members, physicians, and other caregivers new ways to experience and work with the complex challenges of the medical experience. The final section, by Ian Williams and MK Czerwiec, focuses on the practice of creating graphic narratives, iconography, drawing as a social practice, and the nature of comics as visual rhetoric. A conclusion (in comics form) testifies to the diverse and growing graphic medicine community. Two valuable bibliographies guide readers to comics and scholarly works relevant to the field.
Since at least 1939, when daily-strip caveman Alley Oop time-traveled to the Trojan War, comics have been drawing (on) material from Greek and Roman myth, literature and history. At times the connection is cosmetic-as perhaps with Wonder Woman's Amazonian heritage-and at times it is almost irrelevant-as with Hercules' starfaring adventures in the 1982 Marvel miniseries. But all of these make implicit or explicit claims about the place of classics in modern literary culture. Classics and Comics is the first book to explore the engagement of classics with the epitome of modern popular literature, the comic book. This volume collects sixteen articles, all specially commissioned for this volume, that look at how classical content is deployed in comics and reconfigured for a modern audience. It opens with a detailed historical introduction surveying the role of classical material in comics since the 1930s. Subsequent chapters cover a broad range of topics, including the incorporation of modern theories of myth into the creation and interpretation of comic books, the appropriation of characters from classical literature and myth, and the reconfiguration of motif into a modern literary medium. Among the well-known comics considered in the collection are Frank Miller's 300 and Sin City, DC Comics' Wonder Woman, Jack Kirby's The Eternals, Neil Gaiman's Sandman, and examples of Japanese manga. The volume also includes an original 12-page "comics-essay," drawn and written by Eisner Award-winning Eric Shanower, creator of the graphic novel series Age of Bronze.
Our society is shaped by our media – now more than at any time in history. They play a crucial role in culture, commerce and politics alike. The Ascent of Media is the first book to look at the new digital era in the context of all that has gone before, and to build on the past to describe the media landscape of the future. Roger Parry takes us on a journey from the earliest written story – the Legend of Gilgamesh etched on clay tablets – to the Gutenberg press, and from the theatres of Athens to satellite TV and the coming semantic web. Tracing 3000 years of history, he shows how today’s media have been shaped by the interaction of politics, economics and technology. He explains why Britain has the public service BBC whilst America developed the private broadcasting networks ABC, CBS, FOX and NBC. He profiles the people and organizations that have created the media world and reveals the often surprising stories behind such ubiquitous items as the keyboard, telephone dial and tabloid. The book shows that issues of today such as a sensationalist press, piracy, monopoly, walled gardens and balancing advertising and subscription revenue have all happened before. Each upheaval in the media world – the development of moveable type printing in the 1450s; the telegraph network in the 1850s; radio broadcasting in the 1920s; and digital distribution in the 2000s – created huge fortunes, challenged authority and raised fundamental issues of copyright, privacy and censorship. Traditional media then adapt, evolve and go on to thrive in the face of competition. The convergence of the internet, mobile phones and tablet computers is now transforming our culture. Established media giants are struggling, while new firms like Google and Apple are thriving. The superabundance of media, with increasing amounts generated by consumers themselves, means that media professionals are becoming curators as much as creators of content. The Ascent of Media traces the story of media from clay tablets to tabloids to the tablet computer. It relates how we got where we are and, based on the experience of history, where we are likely to go next.
In The Secret Origins of Comics Studies, today’s leading comics scholars turn back a page to reveal the founding figures dedicated to understanding comics art. Edited by comics scholars Matthew J. Smith and Randy Duncan, this collection provides an in-depth study of the individuals and institutions that have created and shaped the field of Comics Studies over the past 75 years. From Coulton Waugh to Wolfgang Fuchs, these influential historians, educators, and theorists produced the foundational work and built the institutions that inspired the recent surge in scholarly work in this dynamic, interdisciplinary field. Sometimes scorned, often underappreciated, these visionaries established a path followed by subsequent generations of scholars in literary studies, communication, art history, the social sciences, and more. Giving not only credit where credit is due, this volume both offers an authoritative account of the history of Comics Studies and also helps move the field forward by being a valuable resource for creating graduate student reading lists and the first stop for anyone writing a comics-related literature review.
The Art of Comics is the first-ever collection of essays published in English devoted to the philosophical topics raised by comics and graphic novels. In an area of growing philosophical interest, this volume constitutes a great leap forward in the development of this fast expanding field, and makes a powerful contribution to the philosophy of art. The first-ever anthology to address the philosophical issues raised by the art of comics Provides an extensive and thorough introduction to the field, and to comics more generally Responds to the increasing philosophical interest in comic art Includes a preface by the renowned comics author Warren Ellis Many of the chapters are illustrated, and the book carries a stunning cover by the rising young comics star David Heatley
David Smith ist Bildhauer. Talentiert, aber nicht berühmt. Deshalb nimmt er auch allzu gerne das faustische Angebot an, jede Skulptur, die er sich vorstellen kann, mit seinen Händen erschaffen zu können, ganz gleich aus welchen Materialien. Auch wenn der Preis für diese Kunst sein Leben ist. Doch David hat dabei zwei Dinge nicht bedacht: Die Schwierigkeit ein Kunstwerk für die Ewigkeit zu erschaffen und ... die Liebe. Er hat nur 200 Tage, um beidem gerecht zu werden. Es gibt nur wenige moderne Comicschöpfer, die so großen Einfluss auf die künstlerische Konstruktion von Comics hatten wie der Amerikaner Scott McCloud. Nach seinen berühmten Standardwerken über Comics ("Comics richtig lesen", "Comics neu erfinden" und "Comics machen") hat er nun endlich seine erste große Graphic Novel geschrieben. Auf fast 500 Seiten nimmt er den Leser mit auf eine einzigartige Reise durch die Kunstwelt und die Seele eines Künstlers. Mit jedem Panel beweist McCloud seine große Fähigkeit, mit Bildern erzählen zu können.
This authoritative and innovative volume explores the place of Shakespeare in relation to a wide range of artistic practices and activities, past and present.
Using Comic Art to Improve Speaking, Reading and Writing uses children's interest in pictures, comics and graphic novels as a way of developing their creative writing abilities, reading skills and oracy. The book's underpinning strategy is the use of comic art images as a visual analogue to help children generate, organise and refine their ideas when writing and talking about text. In reading comic books children are engaging with highly complex and structured narrative forms. Whether they realise it or not, their emergent visual literacy promotes thinking skills and develops wider metacognitive abilities. Using Comic Art not only motivates children to read more widely, but also enables them to enjoy a richer imagined world when reading comics, text based stories and their own written work. The book sets out a range of practical techniques and activities which focus on various aspects of narrative, including: using comic art as a visual organiser for planning writing openings and endings identifying with the reader, using different genres and developing characters creating pace, drama, tension and anticipation includes 'Kapow!' techniques to kick start lessons an afterword on the learning value of comics. The activities in Using Comic Art start from this baseline of confident and competent comic-book readers, and show how skills they already possess can be transferred to a range of writing tasks. For instance, the way the panels on a comic's page are arranged can serve as a template for organising paragraphs in a written story or a piece of non-fiction writing. The visual conventions of a graphic novel – the shape of speech bubbles or the way the reader's attention is directed – can inform children in the use of written dialogue and the inclusion of vivid and relevant details. A creative and essential resource for every primary classroom, Using Comic Art is ideal for primary and secondary school teachers and TAs, as well as primary PGCE students and BEd, BA Primary Undergraduates.
Nach dem sich Scott McCloud in seinen ersten beiden Büchern »Comics richtig lesen« und »Comics neu erfinden« der Theorie und der Zukunft des Mediums Comic gewidmet hat, wendet er sich nun den praktischen Dingen zu. »Comics machen« schildert in gewohnt profunder und amüsanter Weise den Prozess des Comic-Schaffens. Hier lernt man alles über... - die Wahl des richtigen Bildausschnitts, um eine klare und stringente Geschichte zu erzählen. - die Aufteilung einer Seite, um den besten Lesefluss zu ermöglichen. - die gelungene Komposition von Texten und Bildern. - die Schaffung neuer und interessanter Figuren. - den Gebrauch von Körpersprache, Gestik und Mimik, um den Figuren Leben einzuhauchen. - die Schaffung vielfältiger und glaubhafter Welten, in denen die Leser sich verlieren können. - die richtigen Zeichenwerkzeuge. - die verschiedenen Comicstile und Genres. Dieses Buch ist ein umfassender Wegweiser für alle, die selbst Comics machen wollen. Ganz gleich ob sie für Comics, Manga oder Graphic Novels schwärmen, ob sie zeichnen, Geschichten schreiben oder beides verbinden wollen.
Web 2.0 and financial markets have a lot in common. Both are highly networked information markets driven by collective intelligence. Both have a lot of money at stake. But financial markets have been around a lot longer and are much bigger and more mature, so they might give us insight into possible futures for the Web 2.0 economy. And when you look closer, you can see that Wall Street is learning from Web 2.0, too. We've barely begun studying the implications of this analogy and the crosstalk between these two marketplaces, but we've already uncovered so much of value that we decided to share what we've learned so far in order to start a broader conversation. Other topics in the 2nd issue of Release 2.0: Channeling Crowds: Why the merger of social networking and prediction markets will launch a new category of tech startups. Open Data: From the Webcam to the Brokerage - Exhibitionism and Wall Street, it turns out, have a lot in common. Counting on Second Life - Behind the hype and argument there are real numbers to tell us who's in the virtual world and what they're doing. The Canon: We take a look at Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art, by Scott McCloud, HarperPerennial Publishers.
This collection of 13 new essays employs ethnographic methods to investigate San Diego’s Comic-Con International, the largest annual celebration of the popular arts in North America. Working from a common grounding in fan studies, these individual explorations examine a range of cultural practices at an event drawing crowds of nearly 125,000 each summer. Investigations range from the practices of fans costuming themselves to the talk of corporate marketers. The collection seeks to expand fan studies, exploring Comic-Con International more deeply than any publication before it.
Kitty is bored. She is so bored, in fact, that she even considers playing with that slobbering mutt Puppy, who lives in her house. Nah. Instead, she thinks she'll take a nap. That is, until there is a knock on the door . . . Strange Kitty is here to guide both Kitty and Kitty's fans through the world of making comics. Like to draw? Great! Here's your chance to show off your skills! Don't know how to draw? That's okay! Through guided exercises you will learn all about how comics work, including sections on panelling, sound and visual effects, word balloons and so much more! With such fun activities and a hilarious story to boot, this is bound to be a Bad Kitty favorite!
The future belongs to a different kind of person with a different kind of mind: artists, inventors, storytellers-creative and holistic "right-brain" thinkers whose abilities mark the fault line between who gets ahead and who doesn't. Drawing on research from around the world, Pink (author of To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Motivating Others) outlines the six fundamentally human abilities that are absolute essentials for professional success and personal fulfillment--and reveals how to master them. A Whole New Mind takes readers to a daring new place, and a provocative and necessary new way of thinking about a future that's already here.
Profiles seventy-five authors, writing teams, and illustrators of graphic novels, and features an introduction to the genre, discussion of manga, brief accounts of graphic novel publishers, a glossary, and photographs.
Twelve-year-olds Lila and Ecco are interested in making a comic book and one day they stumble into a workshop of comics creators where they learn how to write a script; create comic art; use pencils; design a cover; and bind the final version of a comic book.

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