This "How It's Done" series reveals insider hints, tips, and tricks from one of the world’s greatest comic creators in his own words. The artist behind juggernauts like Watchmen and The Green Lantern, Dave Gibbons is here to teach you scriptwriting, page layouts, lettering, cover designs, and more, and he’s doing it with scans of original artwork and rarely seen workings to illustrate his personal creative processes. How Comics Work covers both Gibbons' hand-drawn and digital design techniques in depth. An early adopter of computer design in comic creation, all his lettering is digital, and he even has his own 'hand-lettered' font. This is your chance to gain insight to Gibbons' digital work, from his computer coloring and 3D modelling with Angus McKie on Give Me Liberty, to his work on The Originals using digital greytones. You’ll learn how he layers text for editing, creates effects such as flares and neon glows, and prepares artwork for print and online.
"There's a million books on how comics are put together, but none from the master storyteller behind the greatest graphic novel of all time. This is Orson Welles giving you a movie tutorial. If you're serious about this business this should be sitting on your desk." Mark Millar, writer/co-creator of Kingsman: The Secret Service, Kick-Ass, Wanted, Civil War "Essential reading." Garth Ennis, co-creator of Preacher, The Boys, Crossed, Hitman and writer of Hellblazer and The Punisher "I would have to say this is the comic book equivalent to Charles Darwin's Origin of Species." Forbidden Planet International A masterclass taught by Britain's first Comics Laureate , Dave Gibbons, this is the most authoritative guide on how comics are made today. Packed full of rare and unpublished material from Gibbons' archive it reveals insider tips on how comics such as 2000 AD and Watchmen were made. Written in collaboration with award-winning writer and editor Tim Pilcher, this unique guide takes you through each stage of the comic's creation process, from scriptwriting, to moving through character and superhero design, to lettering and colouring and finally on to covers and logo design. Throughout this insightful course are real-life examples of Gibbons' art, revealing how he solved actual problems with practical solutions, and unique behind-the-scenes insights into the creative process. Learn the stages of layout and page planning through the initial designs of Give Me Liberty; discover Gibbons handy tips for lettering using never-before-seen examples from The Originals; and find out the secrets of successful writing with sample scripts from The World's Finest and The Secret Service.
Praised throughout the cartoon industry by such luminaries as Art Spiegelman, Matt Groening, and Will Eisner, this innovative comic book provides a detailed look at the history, meaning, and art of comics and cartooning.
This anthology explores tensions between the individualistic artistic ideals and the collective industrial realities of contemporary cultural production with eighteen all-new chapters presenting pioneering empirical research on the complexities and controversies of comics work. Art Spiegelman. Alan Moore. Osamu Tezuka. Neil Gaiman. Names such as these have become synonymous with the medium of comics. Meanwhile, the large numbers of people without whose collective action no comic book would ever exist in the first place are routinely overlooked. Cultures of Comics Work unveils this hidden, global industrial labor of writers, illustrators, graphic designers, letterers, editors, printers, typesetters, publicists, publishers, distributors, translators, retailers, and countless others both directly and indirectly involved in the creative production of what is commonly thought of as the comic book. Drawing upon diverse theoretical and methodological perspectives, an international and interdisciplinary cohort of cutting-edge researchers and practitioners intervenes in debates about cultural work and paves innovative directions for comics scholarship.
Suddenly, comics are everywhere: a newly matured art form, filling bookshelves with brilliant, innovative work and shaping the ideas and images of the rest of contemporary culture. In Reading Comics, critic Douglas Wolk shows us why and how. Wolk illuminates the most dazzling creators of modern comics-from Alan Moore to Alison Bechdel to Chris Ware-and explains their roots, influences, and where they fit into the pantheon of art. As accessible to the hardcore fan as to the curious newcomer, Reading Comics is the first book for people who want to know not just which comics are worth reading, but ways to think and talk and argue about them.
Scott McCloud tore down the wall between high and low culture in 1993 with Understanding Comics, a massive comic book about comics, linking the medium to such diverse fields as media theory, movie criticism, and web design. In Reinventing Comics, McCloud took this to the next level, charting twelve different revolutions in how comics are generated, read, and perceived today. Now, in Making Comics, McCloud focuses his analysis on the art form itself, exploring the creation of comics, from the broadest principles to the sharpest details (like how to accentuate a character's facial muscles in order to form the emotion of disgust rather than the emotion of surprise.) And he does all of it in his inimitable voice and through his cartoon stand–in narrator, mixing dry humor and legitimate instruction. McCloud shows his reader how to master the human condition through word and image in a brilliantly minimalistic way. Comic book devotees as well as the most uninitiated will marvel at this journey into a once–underappreciated art form.
From a brilliant and witty comic book aficionado, this “scholarly but lively narrative” (Kirkus Reviews) reveals the links between Jews and the iconic superheroes of Jerry Siegel, Joe Shuster, Stan Lee, and Jack Kirby. Many of us know that the superheroes at the heart of the American comic book industry were created by Jews. But you’d be surprised to learn how much these beloved characters were shaped by the cultural and religious traditions of their makers. Superman Is Jewish? follows the “people of the book” as they become the people of the comic book. With great wit and compelling arguments, Harry Brod situates superheroes within the course of Jewish-American history: they are aliens in a foreign land, like Superman; figures plagued by guilt for abandoning their families, like Spider-Man; and outsiders persecuted for being different, like the X-Men. Brod blends humor and sharp observation as he considers the overt and discreet Jewish characteristics of these well-known figures and explores how their creators integrated their Jewish identities and their creativity. Captivating, poignant, and packed with historical insights, this guided tour travels from the Passover Haggadah’s exciting action scenes of Moses’s superpowers through the Yiddish humor of Mad magazine to two Pulitzer Prizes awarded in one decade to Jewish comic book guys Art Spiegelman and Michael Chabon. “A witty, insightful exposé” (Publisher’s Weekly), Superman Is Jewish? is an endlessly fascinating American saga about an immigrant group that used comic books to see itself in new, empowering—and laughable—ways. You don’t even have to be Jewish to get a kick out of it.
Offers teachers a comprehensive guide to effectively using comics in any multilingual classroom.
In-depth interviews with comics art legends reveal the secrets of translating comics script to graphic storytelling for the first time. Technique, style, layouts, approach, pencilling, inking... no facet of the artist's craft is left unexplored, and this is just the beginning. Salisbury gets to grips with the lively creative genius behind the pencil and ink, presenting an unparalleled insight into the widescreen mind of the comic book artist. Revealing, instructional, shocking and humorous, Artists on Comics Art has something for comics fans, budding artists and hardened professionals alike. Features interviews with: Brian Bolland, J Scott Campbell, Steve Dillon, Dave Gibbons, Bryan Hitch, Jim Lee, Dave McKean, Frank Miller, Joe Quesada, John Romita Jr and Alex Ross.
In hard-hitting accounts of Auschwitz, Bosnia, Palestine, and Hiroshima’s Ground Zero, comics have shown a stunning capacity to bear witness to trauma. Hillary Chute explores the ways graphic narratives by diverse artists, including Jacques Callot, Francisco Goya, Keiji Nakazawa, Art Spiegelman, and Joe Sacco, document the disasters of war.
"In this graphic book/novel, readers eavesdrop on conversations about contemporary science and learn about how scientists uncover the secrets of the universe. Topics in the book range from black holes, to the multiverse, to string theory, to food science. The book is structured as a set of 9 conversations in 11 chapters. The people in the conversations include non-experts and experts in physics, both adults and children, both male and female. These characters are fictional. The locations are in cities around the world, in cafes, train stations, on the street, buses, museums, libraries. The book is, uniquely for this subject matter, a fully graphic book. A graphic novel, but NOT science fiction. The science is real, and often concerns research topics that have been highlighted in general-interest media outlets"--
Tells how success came to Milestone Comics in the 1990s. Focuses on the African American heroes in a town called Dakota. Represents an alternative model of black heroism.
Everything that you need to know about reading, making, and understanding comics can be found in a single Nancy strip by Ernie Bushmiller from August 8, 1959. Paul Karasik and Mark Newgarden’s groundbreaking work How to Read Nancy ingeniously isolates the separate building blocks of the language of comics through the deconstruction of a single strip. No other book on comics has taken such a simple yet methodical approach to laying bare how the comics medium really works. No other book of any kind has taken a single work by any artist and minutely (and entertainingly) pulled it apart like this. How to Read Nancy is a completely new approach towards deep-reading art. In addition, How to Read Nancy is a thoroughly researched history of how comics are made, from their creation at the drawing board to their ultimate destination at the bookstore. Textbook, art book, monogram, dissection, How to Read Nancy is a game changer in understanding how the “simplest” drawings grab us and never leave. Perfect for students, academics, scholars, and casual fans.
Once upon a time...a princess tried to make a comic. And with the help of a magical cartooning elf, she learned how--well enough to draw her way out of an encounter with a dangerous dragon, near-death by drowning, and into her very own adventure!--From publisher description.
A pair of attorneys and comic book enthusiasts evaluate how America's legal system would work if subjected to popular comic-book characters, powers and themes, from whether or not Superman could sue someone for revealing his secret identity to whether or not the Legion of Doom could be prosecuted under RICO. 20,000 first printing.
Filled with beautiful full-color art, dynamic storytelling, and insightful analysis, Hillary Chute’s Why Comics? reveals what makes one of the most critically acclaimed and popular art forms unique and so appealing, and how it got that way. Over the past century, fans have elevated comics from the back pages of newspapers into one of our most celebrated forms of culture, from Fun Home, the Tony Award–winning musical based on Alison Bechdel’s groundbreaking graphic memoir, to the dozens of superhero films that are annual blockbusters worldwide. What is the essence of comics’ appeal? What does this art form do that others can’t? Whether you’ve read every comic you can get your hands on or you’re just starting your journey, Why Comics? has something for you. Author Hillary Chute chronicles comics culture, explaining underground comics (also known as “comix”) and graphic novels, analyzing their evolution, and offering fascinating portraits of the creative men and women behind them. Chute reveals why these works—a blend of concise words and striking visuals—are an extraordinarily powerful form of expression that stimulates us intellectually and emotionally. Focusing on ten major themes—disaster, superheroes, sex, the suburbs, cities, punk, illness and disability, girls, war, and queerness—Chute explains how comics gets its messages across more effectively than any other form. “Why Disaster?” explores how comics are uniquely suited to convey the scale and disorientation of calamity, from Art Spiegelman’s representation of the Holocaust and 9/11 to Keiji Nakazawa’s focus on Hiroshima. “Why the Suburbs?” examines how the work of Chris Ware and Charles Burns illustrates the quiet joys and struggles of suburban existence; and “Why Punk?” delves into how comics inspire and reflect the punk movement’s DIY aesthetics—giving birth to a democratic medium increasingly embraced by some of today’s most significant artists. Featuring full-color reproductions of more than one hundred essential pages and panels, including some famous but never-before-reprinted images from comics legends, Why Comics? is an indispensable guide that offers a deep understanding of this influential art form and its masters.
Widely considered the greatest graphic novel ever written, Alan Moore's dystopian masterpiece Watchmen is now presented in a new hardcover edition with an exclusive slipcase, as a part of DC Modern Classics. In an alternate world where the mere presence of American superheroes changed history, the US won the Vietnam War, Nixon is still president, and the cold war is in full effect. Watchmen begins as a murder-mystery, but soon unfolds into a planet-altering conspiracy. As the resolution comes to a head, the unlikely group of reunited heroes--Rorschach, Nite Owl, Silk Spectre, Dr. Manhattan and Ozymandias--have to test the limits of their convictions and ask themselves where the true line is between good and evil. Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons created Watchmen and changed the course of comics' history, essentially remaking how popular culture perceived the genre. It's no coincidence that this groundbreaking volume is the first of DC Modern Classics. DC Modern Classics features the most highly regarded graphic novels from the world's foremost authority on graphic literature. These groundbreaking, genre-defining works are presented in new unique hardcover editions, each fitting into a beautifully designed exclusive slipcase, perfect for display. DC Modern Classics are a must-have for any collector, as well as any new fan just beginning to build their graphic novel library.
This anthology explores tensions between the individualistic artistic ideals and the collective industrial realities of contemporary cultural production with eighteen all-new chapters presenting pioneering empirical research on the complexities and controversies of comics work. Art Spiegelman. Alan Moore. Osamu Tezuka. Neil Gaiman. Names such as these have become synonymous with the medium of comics. Meanwhile, the large numbers of people without whose collective action no comic book would ever exist in the first place are routinely overlooked. Cultures of Comics Work unveils this hidden, global industrial labor of writers, illustrators, graphic designers, letterers, editors, printers, typesetters, publicists, publishers, distributors, translators, retailers, and countless others both directly and indirectly involved in the creative production of what is commonly thought of as the comic book. Drawing upon diverse theoretical and methodological perspectives, an international and interdisciplinary cohort of cutting-edge researchers and practitioners intervenes in debates about cultural work and paves innovative directions for comics scholarship.
A treasure and a treasury! Innovative cartoonist and renowned children's book artists from around the world have gathered to bring you the magic of fairy tales through the wonder of comics. The stories range from old favorites to new discoveries, from the profound to the silly. A treat for all ages, these picture stories unlock the enchanted door into the pleasures of books and reading! Best Children's Books 2000 (PW)

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