This is a handbook and survival manual for PhD students providing a practical, realistic understanding of the processes of doing research for a doctrate.
Historically, it has been presumed that being an experienced researcher was enough in itself to guarantee effective supervision. This has always been a dubious presumption and it has become an untenable one in the light of global developments in the doctorate itself and in the candidate population which have transformed demands upon expectations of supervisors. This handbook will assist new and experienced supervisors to respond to these changes. Divided into six parts the book looks at the following issues: changing contexts of doctoral supervision recruiting, selecting and working with doctoral candidates supporting the research project supporting candidates of all nationalities and academic backgrounds supporting completion of projects and examination evaluation and dissemination of practice. A Handbook for Doctoral Supervisors focuses on the practical needs of supervisors, draws examples from a wide range of countries and uses self-interrogation as a means of encouraging readers to reflect upon their practice, making it an essential read for anyone involved in doctoral supervision.
Authoring a PhD is a complex process. It involves having creative ideas, working out how to organize them, writing up from plans, upgrading the text, and finishing it speedily and to a good standard. It also includes being examined and getting published. Patrick Dunleavy has written Authoring a PhD based on his supervision experience with over 30 students. It provides solid advice to help your PhD students cope with both the intellectual issues and practical difficulties of organizing their work effectively. It is an indispensable and time saving aid for doctoral students in the humanities, social sciences, education, business studies, law, health, arts and visual arts, and related disciplines, and will also be a great help to supervisors.
'It also incorporates a wealth of information that most supervisors and examiners only acquire through years of experience... this book deserves to be widely read and, if it is, it should contribute to an improvement in the quality of both research degree examining and the student's performance at the viva.' Professor Diana Woodward, University Director of Research, Napier University, Edinburgh and retiring UKCGE Executive Committee Member 'importantly the book deals with perspectives of all three concerned parties, i.e., the candidate, examiner and supervisor. It is . . . a very useful guide to appreciate and prepare for the different stages of the doctoral examination process.' Higher Education Quarterly What is the viva and how can students prepare for it? What should supervisors consider when selecting PhD examiners? How should examiners assess a doctoral thesis and conduct the viva? The doctoral examination process has been shrouded in mystery and has been a source of anxiety and concern for students, supervisors and examiners alike. But now help is at hand. This book sheds new light on the process, providing constructive ways of understanding the doctoral examination, preparing for it and undertaking it. This book stands alone in the field due to the extensive research undertaken by the authors. Over a four year period, surveys and interviews were undertaken with candidates and academics from a wide range of disciplines throughout Britain. Outcomes and ideas from the research have been united to provide the most comprehensive information available. Real life accounts and case studies are combined with useful advice, tasks and checklists to create an illuminating handbook. This user-friendly book is a vital resource for anyone involved in the doctoral process. No doctoral candidate, examiner or supervisor should be without it.
This title, from Gordon Rugg and Marian Petre, discusses the unwritten rules of the academic world, the things people forget to tell you about doing a doctorate.
Outlines the concepts and strategies that will greatly facilitate the successful completion of postgraduate studies and offers help and advice on research methods, data analysis techniques, writing skills and student-supervisor relationships. The manual is an invaluable guide to postgraduate studies. Essential reading for PhD and other students.
Research in Information Systems helps supervisors and their students get the most out of the PhD experience. It can be used as a basis of courses for supervisors and their research students. This book covers: . the supervisor - student relationship . practical, social and academic issues . different models for PhD programs, including US, UK, Latin and Scandinavian models. Many vignettes of personal experiences and reflections provide context for the material. The book is written by experts - leading international academics in the field of information systems. They all have had wide experience of research supervision over many years in many countries. * The only handbook available specifically for Information Systems, and written for both research supervisors and their students * Content agreed and approved by an international panel of experts, ensuring worldwide relevance * Includes real life anecdotes to educate, entertain, and contextualise
The second edition of this best-selling book is aslively and accessible as the first edition. Advice, support and both active and reflective tasks take the students through the stages of research as well as encouraging them to consider social and cultural issues, such as working with their supervisor and other researchers.
This co-edited book provides doctoral candidates with a practical, cross-discipline handbook for successfully navigating the doctoral process – from initial program selection to the final dissertation defense and preparing for the faculty interview. Invited chapters from established higher education experts cover topics ranging from university and program selection, preparing for comprehensive exams and dissertation research, self-care and self-management strategies, and recommendations for maintaining personal and professional support systems. Each chapter includes strategies for success and practical tips, including how to create a study guide for the comprehensive examination, how to create a professional support group, how to talk to your family about the doctoral process, how to select and work with a chair and committee, how to identify an appropriate research design, how to navigate the IRB process, and how to master the research and writing process.
A Survival Kit for Doctoral Students and Their Supervisors offers a hands-on guide to both students and supervisors on the doctoral journey, helping make the process as enjoyable as it is productive. Drawing on research from peer learning groups, contributed narratives, and their own programs, authors Lene Tanggaard and Charlotte Wegener emphasize the value of the doctoral partnership and the ways in which shared knowledge can facilitate a rewarding journey for students and their advisors. Grounded in theoretical and empirical material, the book helps participants navigate the doctoral process with personal stories and examples from a variety of researchers. A discussion of common challenges and the inclusion of practical tips further enhance the book’s diverse range of helpful resources.
A compact book offering students specific, succinct guidance to the core process and major hurdles involved in undertaking a PhD. As well as offering practical advice, such as how to shape initial ideas, the book also encourages students to find and value their own pathways and approaches within academia.
What criteria are used to assess the scholarly merit of a thesis? What is the level of conceptualization that is expected in doctoral theses? How can you prepare to defend your thesis? What is the most effective route to achieving your doctorate? The starting point to achieving your doctorate is to appreciate how your thesis will be examined. The criteria that examiners use, the questions they ask in vivas and their reports provide templates against which theses are judged. So, why not start from this endpoint as you plan, undertake, write and defend your research? This book focuses specifically on how you, as a doctoral candidate, can raise your level of thinking about your chosen topic. Doing so will improve the quality of your research and ultimately contribute to knowledge. It also explores the nature of conceptualization which is sought by examiners in theses. As a candidate, the book provides those essential characteristics of doctorateness that examiners expect to find in your thesis. The book will also appeal to supervisors, examiners and those who conduct workshops for doctoral candidates and supervisors. This practical book includes extracts from theses, examiner reports and cameo accounts from doctoral examiners, supervisors and candidates. It also contains numerous visual models that explain relationships and processes for you to apply and use in your doctoral journey. Based upon contemporary practice, Stepping Stones to Achieving your Doctorate is an essential tool for doctoral candidates, supervisors and examiners.
If the aim of a PhD is to develop the skills of a professional academic researcher, how should you go about it? Using the principles of skill development as a foundation, this book provides a unique approach to the most common challenges of PhD research, including: - Getting to know the literature in your field - Developing your research ideas - Becoming a better academic writer - Coping with the stress and unpredictability of research - Publications and presentations - Writing, submitting and defending your thesis
"Mastering Your PhD: Survival and Success in the Doctoral Years and Beyond" helps guide PhD students through their graduate student years. Filled with practical advice on getting started, communicating with your supervisor, staying the course, and planning for the future, this book is a handy guide for graduate students who need that extra bit of help getting started and making it through. While mainly directed at PhD students in the sciences, the book's scope is broad enough to encompass the obstacles and hurdles that almost all PhD students face during their doctoral training. Who should read this book? Students of the physical and life sciences, computer science, math, and medicine who are thinking about entering a PhD program; doctoral students at the beginning of their research; and any graduate student who is feeling frustrated and stuck. It's never too early -- or too late! This second edition contains a variety of new material, including additional chapters on how to communicate better with your supervisor, dealing with difficult people, how to find a mentor, and new chapters on your next career step, once you have your coveted doctoral degree in hand.
Helping Doctoral Students Write offers a proven approach to effective doctoral writing. By treating research as writing and writing as research, the authors offer pedagogical strategies for doctoral supervisors that will assist the production of well-argued and lively dissertations. It is clear that many doctoral candidates find research writing complicated and difficult, but the advice they receive often glosses over the complexities of writing and/or locates the problem in the writer. Kamler and Thomson provide a highly effective framework for scholarly work that is located in personal, institutional and cultural contexts. The pedagogical approach developed in the book is based on the notion of writing as a social practice. This approach allows supervisors to think of doctoral writers as novices who need to learn new ways with words as they enter the discursive practices of scholarly communities. This involves learning sophisticated writing practices with specific sets of conventions and textual characteristics. The authors offer supervisors practical advice on helping with commonly encountered writing tasks such as the proposal, the journal abstract, the literature review and constructing the dissertation argument. The first edition of this book has helped many academics and thousands of research students produce better written material. Now fully updated the second edition includes: Examples from a broader range of academic disciplines A new chapter on writing from the thesis for peer reviewed journals More advice on reading and note taking, performance and conferences, Further information on developing a personal academic writing style, and Advice on the use of social media (blogs, tweets and wikis) to create trans-disciplinary and trans-national networks and conversations. Their discussion of the complexities of forming a scholarly identity is illustrated throughout by stories and writings of actual doctoral students. In conclusion, they present a persuasive and proven argument that universities must move away from simply auditing supervision to supporting the development of scholarly research communities. Any supervisor keen to help their students develop as academics will find the ideas and practical solutions presented in this book fascinating and insightful reading.
If you are a doctoral or non-doctoral student about to begin your internship in school psychology, you may have several questions about the process and what it will involve, and you may even be facing some anxiety about it. If you are a site or university supervisor preparing for the beginning of the internship year, you may be looking for ways to improve the internship experience for your students or for yourself and your fellow supervisors. Newman has used his many years of experience working with interns and field supervisors to create this guide to the school psychology internship process to address these common concerns. He provides a comprehensive overview of the school psychology internship process from start to finish, describing actions that can be taken to promote a high quality, dynamic internship experience. Emphasis is placed on the idea that the internship year is a dynamic and formative experience, not a static event, and that interns and supervisors both must be active planners, coordinators, and shapers of the experience. Each part of the book explores a different phase of the internship, from the first days through job applications and interviews. Helpful and pragmatic tools are included throughout, such as evaluation tools, best practice guidelines, and sample forms. Online resources are also available to complement the book and include reproducible material from the book, videos students can use to practice their interviewing skills, and links to helpful resources.
This is a practical and positive guide to doing a PhD by publication, which enables current and prospective candidates to better understand the processes involved, avoid the potential pitfalls and to respond appropriately to the challenges. It includes both narrative accounts and advice from people who have undertaken the route successfully.
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Writing is vitally important at every stage of the PhD research journey, and this text will help you to develop the skills you need to succeed at each step. It will show you how to develop a research topic and explore key concepts through writing, how to build a structured chapter framework, and how to write clearly, coherently and stylishly.

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