Scientists in the news speak out from opposite sides of the fence on the question of DNA testing for researching family history and ancestry. How do you interpret your own DNA test results? How do you work with or research oral history? What's the cultural component behind a trait as biological as your genes? If you're a beginning family historian, an oral history researcher, or a person with no science background fascinated with ancestry, here's how to understand and use the results of DNA tests. Scientists, media, historians, and business owners share different opinions on whether DNA testing is a useful tool in the hands of family historians. Steve Olson, author of the book, Mapping Human History in a telephone interview with me answered my question, "What do you say about using DNA as a tool for genealogy-to extend family history research?" Does Steve Olson think DNA testing as a tool is useful to genealogists? What does Bryan Sykes, author of the best-selling, The Seven Daughters of Eve have to say? Sykes's book has a very different opinion about DNA testing and genealogy/family history research. The two have opposite views. Numerous scientists comment. Sykes is associated with Oxford Ancestors, the world's first company to harness the power and precision of modern DNA-based genetics for use in genealogy. The motto on the Oxford Ancestors Web site reads: "Putting the genes in genealogy." Use these resources and easy to understand explanations for family history research.
How many DNA testing companies will show you how to interpret DNA test results for family history or direct you to instructional materials after you have had your DNA tested? Choose a company based on previous customer satisfaction, and whether the company gives you choices of how many markers you want, various ethnic and geographic databases, and surname projects based on DNA-driven genealogy. Before you select a company to test your DNA, find out how many genetic markers will be tested. For the maternal line, 400 base pairs of sequences are the minimum. For the paternal line (men only) 37 markers are great, but 25 markers also should be useful. Some companies offer a 12-marker test for surname genealogy groups at a special price. Find out how long the turnaround time is for waiting to receive your results. What is the reputation of the company? Do they have a contract with a university lab or a private lab? Who does the testing and who is the chief geneticist at their laboratory? What research articles, if any, has that scientist written or what research studies on DNA have been performed by the person in charge of the DNA testing at the laboratory? Who owns the DNA business that contracts with the lab? How involved in genealogy-related DNA projects and databases or services is the owner?
Here's how to open your own online DNA-driven genealogy reporting/interpreting service business. You wouldn't do the actual DNA testing. The laboratory you contract with does the testing and sends you reports that you interpret for your clients. As a DNA-driven genealogist, you would prepare illustrated and text-driven reports, colorful CDs, brochures, press kits, covers, Web sites, and guides to interpreting the DNA-for-ancestry-based information. You would interpret tests for deep ancestry to your clients. What verbal skills and any other preparation would you need to empower consumers with knowledge from reports you receive from your partnering DNA-testing laboratory? Would you also interpret reports from genetics counselors testing for predisposition to diseases? Or emphasize only deep ancestry? Would you need a self-taught science background, a genealogy hobby, or only marketing and communications experience? Who does the actual interpreting? How would you contract with DNA laboratories to send reports and other information related to ancestry? You may be a genealogist, a personal historian, or a life story videographer thinking of partnering with a DNA-testing laboratory. Your business would be to make complex information easy to understand and interpret in plain language DNA reports from scientists to genealogy clients and surname groups. The DNA tests could be for ancestry and/or nutritional genomics issues.
Here's how to transform your interest in popular health topics such as gene hunters, medical trends, self-help, nutrition, current issues, or pets into writing salable feature articles for popular publications. Become a health-aware feature writer, journalist, editor, indexer, abstractor, proofreader, information broker, book packager, investigative reporter, pharmaceutical copywriter, or documentary video producer. Here are the skills you'll need to transform your interest in popular science into writing health and medical feature and filler articles or columns for a wide variety of publications. For those who always wanted to write or edit medical publications, scripts, medical record histories, case histories, or books, here's a guide with all the strategies and techniques you'll need to become a medical writer, journalist, or editor. Whether you're a medical language specialist, transcriber, freelance writer, editor, indexer, or want to be, you'll learn how to write and market high-demand feature articles for popular magazines on a variety of popular science subjects from health, fitness, and nutrition to DNA, pet issues, and self-help. You'll find not only how-to techniques, but contacts for networking, associations, and where to find the research. You don't need science courses to write about popular science. What you do need is dedication to writing, journalism, or editing-freelance or staff. Feature articles and fillers are wanted on popular health-related subjects for general consumer, women's, men's, and niche magazines.
Here's how to trace Jewish DNA specific to Eastern European Ashkenazim through a history of migrations toward a merging mosaic of communities. A perfect book for beginners in interpreting your DNA test results for family history and ancestry and taking a closer look at the founding mothers of Eastern European Jewish communities as well as the fathers. Where did the women originate? What directions were the migrations in ancient, medieval, and later times? And how did this bring about the particular DNA/genetic patterns we see today in the diverse Eastern European Jewish communities now found all over the world. Look up the genealogy of Jewish genes/DNA through 3,000 years of history. Here's how to interpret your own results. You don't need a science background to match your DNA to your most recent common ancestor who lived 250 or 100 or 1,000 years ago. Scientists speak out on the founding mothers and fathers of the Ashkenazic Jewish communities.
This book is meant to empower the general consumer with knowledge about DNA testing for predisposition to diseases or for deep maternal and paternal ancestry when written records are absent. At home-genetic testing needs watchdogs, Web sites, and guidebooks to interpret test results in plain language for those with no science background. Online, you'll find genetic tests for ancestry or for familial (genetic, inherited) disease risks. What helpful suggestions do general consumers with no science background need to consider? What's new in medical marketing is genetic testing online for predisposition to diseases-such as breast cancer or blood conditions. Kits usually are sent directly to the consumer who returns a mouthwash or swab DNA sample by mail. What type of training do healthcare teams need in order to interpret the results of these tests to consumers? Once you receive the results of online genetic testing kits, how do you interpret it? If your personal physician isn't yet trained to interpret the results of online genetic tests, how can you find a healthcare professional that is trained?
Discover the answers to your family history mysteries using the most-cutting edge tool available to genealogists. This plain-English guide, newly revised and expanded, is a one-stop resource on genetic genealogy for family historians. Inside, you'll learn what DNA tests are available, with up-to-date pros and cons of the major testing companies (including AncestryDNA) and advice on choosing the right test to answer your specific questions. For those who've already taken DNA tests, this guide will demystify and explain how to interpret DNA test results, including how to understand ethnicity estimates and haplogroup designations, navigate suggested cousin matches, and use third-party tools like GEDmatch to further analyze data. Inside, you'll find: Colorful diagrams and expert definitions that explain key DNA terms and concepts, such as haplogroups and DNA inheritance patterns Detailed guides to each of the major kinds of DNA tests: autosomal-DNA (atDNA), mitochondrial-DNA (mtDNA), Y-chromosomal DNA (Y-DNA), and X-chromosomal DNA (X-DNA) Tips for selecting the DNA test that can best help solve your family mysteries, with case studies showing how each test can be useful in research Information about third-party tools you can use to more thoroughly analyze your test results once you've received them Test companion guides and research forms to help you select the most appropriate DNA test and organize your results and research once you've been tested
Personalized medicine is what this book is about-tailoring your lifestyle, food, medicines, treatments, and reproductive choices to your genetic signature. According to Dr. Andrew Y. Silverman, MD, PhD, "The desire to influence the sex of the next child is probably as old as recorded history." "Gender selection is possible because of the way in which sex is determined by our chromosomes. Dr. Ericsson devised patented methods by which X and Y sperm can be separated through filtering processes. Sperm are "layered" over a column of human serum albumin, and they swim down the gradient where they are collected in the bottom layer. "The fraction of sperm that contains the male (Y) bearing sperm is used for insemination if a boy is desired. It is effective 70-75% of the time. "The fraction of sperm that contains the female (X) bearing sperm is used for insemination if a girl is desired. It is effective 70-72% of the time." Use personalized medicine more effectively. Empower consumers by interpreting DNA testing and learning more about infant gender choice by genetics.
650 Millionen Europäer sollen von nur sieben Urmüttern abstammen? Sie meinen, das kann nicht sein? Bryan Sykes, Professor für Genetik an der Universität Oxford, hat die Mitochondrien-DNA Tausender Europäer analysiert und konnte dabei sieben Bausteine entdeckten, die sich auf sieben Töchter der Urmutter Eva zurückführen lassen. Darüber hinaus lässt sich sagen, wann unsere Vorfahren erstmals auftraten, wo und wie sie lebten und wohin sie gingen ═ somit kann jeder von uns herausfinden, von welchem der sieben Stämme er abstammt: Folgen Sie Bryan Sykes auf seiner sensationellen Reise in unsere Vergangenheit!
Finally, in the rapidly evolving field of genetic genealogy an up-to-date resource is here! A Genetic Genealogy Handbook: The Basics and Beyond provides genealogists with the knowledge and confidence to use DNA testing for family research. The book guides genealogists in understanding various tests and determining what DNA segments came from which ancestor. The book explains how DNA testing helps when written records stop and discusses how testing proves or disprove oral family history. Learn which tests help adoptees; understand why you resemble your relatives and how testing can connect you with cousins you never knew. Discover how to encourage potential cousins to test and learn guidelines for becoming a project administrator, genetic genealogy speaker or facilitator for your genealogical society’s DNA interest group. A Genetic Genealogy Handbook: The Basics and Beyond helps experienced and fledgling researchers become genetic genealogists able to use DNA testing to resolve genealogical roadblocks.
Two leading genealogists explain how the latest techniques in genetic testing can help readers research their ancestry and family history, discussing what kind of information DNA testing can provide, how to interpret the results, what is and is not possible with genetic testing, and more. Original. 15,000 first printing.
DNA testing can serve as a powerful tool that unlocks the hidden information within our bodies for family history research. This book explains how genetic genealogy works and answers the questions of genealogists and individuals seeking information on their family trees. • Presents an overview to genealogical principles and an introduction to DNA testing for nonexpert audiences • Explains how genetic genealogy can provide data from within our bodies that tells us about who we are, who our ancestors were, and what characteristics our descendants may have • Addresses key legal and ethical issues regarding DNA testing • Describes the accepted protocols of DNA collection, handling, processing, evaluation, and interpretation that make DNA information more reliable than the other kinds of genealogical information
DNA testing is now being used by thousands of genealogists around the world. DNA and Family History is the first guide to this pioneering subject, designed for family historians and surname study organizers at any stage in their research. In simple language aimed at non-scientists, Chris Pomery examines the background and the issues.
Who are we, and where do we come from? The fundamental drive to answer these questions is at the heart of Finding Your Roots, the companion book to the PBS documentary series seen by 30 million people. As Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr. shows us, the tools of cutting-edge genomics and deep genealogical research now allow us to learn more about our roots, looking further back in time than ever before. Gates's investigations take on the personal and genealogical histories of more than twenty luminaries, including United States Congressman John Lewis, actor Robert Downey Jr., CNN medical correspondent Sanjay Gupta, President of the "Becoming American Institute" Linda Chavez, and comedian Margaret Cho. Interwoven with their moving stories of immigration, assimilation, strife, and success, Gates provides practical information for amateur genealogists just beginning archival research on their own families' roots, and he details the advances in genetic research now available to the public. The result is an illuminating exploration of who we are, how we lost track of our roots, and how we can find them again.
Barack Obama’s historic presidency has re-inserted mixed race into the national conversation. While the troubled and pejorative history of racial amalgamation throughout U.S. history is a familiar story, The United States of the United Races reconsiders an understudied optimist tradition, one which has praised mixture as a means to create a new people, bring equality to all, and fulfill an American destiny. In this genealogy, Greg Carter re-envisions racial mixture as a vehicle for pride and a way for citizens to examine mixed America as a better America. Tracing the centuries-long conversation that began with Hector St. John de Crevecoeur’s Letters of an American Farmer in the 1780s through to the Mulitracial Movement of the 1990s and the debates surrounding racial categories on the U.S. Census in the twenty-first century, Greg Carter explores a broad range of documents and moments, unearthing a new narrative that locates hope in racial mixture. Carter traces the reception of the concept as it has evolved over the years, from and decade to decade and century to century, wherein even minor changes in individual attitudes have paved the way for major changes in public response. The United States of the United Races sweeps away an ugly element of U.S. history, replacing it with a new understanding of race in America.
Here are 102+ ways to use training in family history and genealogy when applied to real-world careers in education, business, or government, including creative entrepreneurial start-ups. With the future marriage of genealogy to smart cards, online databases, or similar authentication technology for family history, population registration (census), and library research, it may be easier to research family lines, not only by DNA matches through DNA testing for deep ancestry, but also with smart, electronic cards designed for electronic identity. It's also a way to track military records as another way to trace family history. Careers and research may focus on various state libraries or historical associations. History and family studies are part of an interdisciplinary liberal arts program that emphasizes research and writing. Journalism courses help round out your ability to express in plain language the results of your reading, explorations, and interpretations. Obtaining a degree or even taking one course or self-study in Family, Public, or Social History can lead to broad, interdisciplinary careers. Graduate work in library science, law, journalism, public history, or genetics counseling (with a double major in the life sciences and social work) also lead to careers in which an historical education may be used.
Uses up-to-date and highly organized methods and techniques to show readers how to find the elusive details to round out their genealogy research. Original.

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