For popular British artist Howard Hodgkin (b.1932), India has been a source of inspiration since he first visited the country in 1964. Although Hodgkin's collection of Indian art has been featured in various publications, this will be the first to explore the influence of India on his work. The first of Hodgkin’s paintings inspired by India, Indian Subject (Blue), 1965-1969, was also the first of his paintings to be painted on wood, rather than canvas. It began a long exploration of paint surface and support that has become a key characteristic of his practice. The book's illustrative journey begins with early works of the 1960s and includes paintings from throughout Hodgkin’s career including his most recent. Featuring unpublished archival material, newly commissioned essays and an interview with the artist, this unique publication sheds light on an important strand of Hodgkin's oeuvre and provides valuable insights into his work in general.
This groundbreaking work takes multimodality studies in a new direction by applying multimodal approaches to the study of poetry and poetics. The book examines poetry’s visual and formal dimensions, applying framing theory to such case studies as Aristotle’s Poetics and Robert Lowell’s "The Heavenly Rain", to demonstrate both the implied, due to the form’s unique relationship with structure, imagery, and rhythm, and explicit forms of multimodality at work, an otherwise little-explored research strand of multimodality studies. The volume explores the theoretical implications of a multimodal approach to poetry and poetics to other art forms and fields of study, making this essential reading for students and scholars working at the intersection of language and communication, including multimodality, discourse analysis, and interdisciplinary literary studies.
Lee Miller (1907-1977) moved to London in the late 1930s, just as a rich strand of Surrealist practice was burgeoning in Britain. Miller was central to its development and prolonged life after World War II, exhibiting alongside British Surrealists such as Eileen Agar and Henry Moore in often overlooked London exhibitions. This book is the first to present Lee Miller's photographs of, and collaborations with key British Surrealists alongside their artworks, to tell the story of this exciting cultural moment. Miller's photographs of noted continental Surrealists such as Max Ernst and E.L.T Mesens, taken while they were working and exhibiting in Britain, also feature alongside their works, documenting their enduring friendships with Miller and her husband, the artist Roland Penrose. Miller's interdisciplinary photographic practice acted as a conduit for the dispersal of Surrealist images out of the realm of fine art and into the worlds of fashion, commercial photography and journalism. A vital study for all students and enthusiasts of Surrealism and those enthralled by the enigmatic Lee Miller, this book reveals the social and cultural networks in which she was embedded, offering a holistic view of her work and the life of the Surrealist movement in Britain.00Exhibition: The Hepworth, Wakefield, UK (22.06.-07.10.2018).
Erst Schock durch Krieg oder Katastrophe, dann der sogenannte Wiederaufbau: Es funktioniert immer nach den gleichen Mechanismen. Wo vor dem Tsunami Fischer ihren Lebensunterhalt verdienten, stehen heute luxuriöse Hotelresorts, im Irak wurden nach dem Krieg die Staatsbetriebe und die Ölwirtschaft neu verteilt - an westliche Konzerne. Existenzen werden vernichtet, es herrscht Wild-West-Kapitalismus der reinsten Sorte. Naomi Klein, Autorin des Welt-Bestsellers ›No Logo‹, weist in ihrem beeindruckenden Buch nach, wie der Siegeszug der neoliberalen Ideologie in den letzten dreißig Jahren auf extremer Gewalt, auf Katastrophen und sogar auf Folter beruht, um die ungezügelte Marktwirtschaft rund um die Welt von Lateinamerika über Osteuropa und Russland bis nach Südafrika und in den Irak durchzusetzen.
This book investigates the millennial history of the Indian subcontinent. Through the various methods adopted, the objects and moments examined, it questions various linguistic, literary and artistic appropriations of the past, to address the conflicting comprehensions of the present and also the figuring/imagining of a possible future. The volume engages with this general cultural condition, in relation both to the subcontinent’s current “synchronic” reality and to certain aspects of the culture’s underlying diachronic determinations. It also reveals how the multiple heritages are negotiated through the subcontinent’s long-term sedimentational history. It scrutinizes both conservative interpretations of heritage and a possibly incremental enrichment, and the additional possibility of a mode of appropriation open to a dialectic of creative destruction, in which the patrimonial imperative is challenged, leaving room for processes of renewal and rejuvenation. The collection is organized around four major topics: Orientalism, addressed by way of the Tamil Epic Manimekalai, through the evocation of the Hastings Circle and views on a possible Hindu-Muslim unity sketched out by Sayyid Ahmed Khan; modernism in Indian and Burmese texts written in English; pictorial art, through a consideration of the work of some modern and contemporary Indian artists and British Asian and Indian film directors; and, finally, the current state of a body of critical thinking on gender.
Accounts of paintings produced during the Mughal dynasty (1526–1857) tend to trace a linear, “evolutionary” path and assert that, as European Renaissance prints reached and influenced Mughal artists, these artists abandoned a Persianate style in favor of a European one. Kavita Singh counters these accounts by demonstrating that Mughal painting did not follow a single arc of stylistic evolution. Instead, during the reigns of the emperors Akbar and Jahangir, Mughal painting underwent repeated cycles of adoption, rejection, and revival of both Persian and European styles. Singh’s subtle and original analysis suggests that the adoption and rejection of these styles was motivated as much by aesthetic interest as by court politics. She contends that Mughal painters were purposely selective in their use of European elements. Stylistic influences from Europe informed some aspects of the paintings, including the depiction of clothing and faces, but the symbolism, allusive practices, and overall composition remained inspired by Persian poetic and painterly conventions. Closely examining magnificent paintings from the period, Singh unravels this entangled history of politics and style and proposes new ways to understand the significance of naturalism and stylization in Mughal art.
»Ein außergewöhnlich intimes und ehrliches Buch über Liebe und Trauer« The Times Julian Barnes’ neues Buch handelt von Ballonfahrt, Fotografie, Liebe und Trauer. Davon, dass man zwei Menschen oder zwei Dinge verbindet und sie wieder auseinanderreißt. Einer der Juroren für den Man Booker Prize nannte Julian Barnes einen »beispiellosen Zauberer des Herzens«. Das vorliegende Buch bestätigt dies. Julian Barnes schreibt über die menschliche Existenz – auf der Erde und in der Luft. Wir lernen Nadar kennen, Pionier der Ballonfahrt und einer der ersten Fotografen, die Luftaufnahmen machten, sowie Colonel Fred Burnaby, der zum eigenwilligen Bewunderer der extravaganten Schauspielerin Sarah Bernhardt wird. Und wir lesen über Julian Barnes’ eigene Trauer über den Tod seiner Frau – schonungslos offen, präzise und tief berührend. Ein Buch über das Wagnis zu lieben. »Eines der besten, bewegendsten Bücher, die es gibt« Evening Standard »Es ist außergewöhnlich, auf einer Seite auszudrücken, was Leben heißt.« The Guardian »Jeder, der einen geliebten Menschen verloren hat und leidet, oder jeder, der leidet, sollte es lesen. Und noch mal lesen. Und noch mal.« Independent
Covering Western art from the ancient Greeks to the present day, this best-selling and authoritative dictionary is more wide-ranging than any comparable reference work. It contains over 2,500 clear and concise entries on styles and movements, materials and techniques, and museums and galleries. It also includes biographical entries for artists, critics, collectors, dealers, and patrons, with places and full dates of birth and death (in many instances correcting misinformation that has found its way into other sources). For this new edition, entries have been thoroughly revised and updated, and more than fifty new entries have been added, for example Tracey Emin and Jack Vettriano. Browsers and readers with an interest in a particular area will benefit from the classified list of all the entries in the book - an invaluable innovation that makes it easy to see immediately which collectors, for example, or 18th-century French artists, or printmaking terms, are included in the dictionary. Written in an engaging manner with many entries enlivened by quotations from artists and critics, this dictionary is a pleasure to browse, whilst its A-Z structure and classified list makes it perfect for quick reference. Previously entitled The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art and Artists, this major new edition is essential for students and teachers of art, design, art theory, and art history, and it is ideal for artists, visitors to art exhibitions and galleries, and anyone with an interest in art.

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