Hyperbolic Manifolds and Discrete Groups is at the crossroads of several branches of mathematics: hyperbolic geometry, discrete groups, 3-dimensional topology, geometric group theory, and complex analysis. The main focus throughout the text is on the "Big Monster," i.e., on Thurston’s hyperbolization theorem, which has not only completely changes the landscape of 3-dimensinal topology and Kleinian group theory but is one of the central results of 3-dimensional topology. The book is fairly self-contained, replete with beautiful illustrations, a rich set of examples of key concepts, numerous exercises, and an extensive bibliography and index. It should serve as an ideal graduate course/seminar text or as a comprehensive reference.
This book grew out of a graduate course on 3-manifolds and is intended for a mathematically experienced audience that is new to low-dimensional topology. The exposition begins with the definition of a manifold, explores possible additional structures on manifolds, discusses the classification of surfaces, introduces key foundational results for 3-manifolds, and provides an overview of knot theory. It then continues with more specialized topics by briefly considering triangulations of 3-manifolds, normal surface theory, and Heegaard splittings. The book finishes with a discussion of topics relevant to viewing 3-manifolds via the curve complex. With about 250 figures and more than 200 exercises, this book can serve as an excellent overview and starting point for the study of 3-manifolds.
This monograph lays down the foundations of the theory of complex Kleinian groups, a newly born area of mathematics whose origin traces back to the work of Riemann, Poincaré, Picard and many others. Kleinian groups are, classically, discrete groups of conformal automorphisms of the Riemann sphere, and these can be regarded too as being groups of holomorphic automorphisms of the complex projective line CP1. When going into higher dimensions, there is a dichotomy: Should we look at conformal automorphisms of the n-sphere?, or should we look at holomorphic automorphisms of higher dimensional complex projective spaces? These two theories are different in higher dimensions. In the first case we are talking about groups of isometries of real hyperbolic spaces, an area of mathematics with a long-standing tradition. In the second case we are talking about an area of mathematics that still is in its childhood, and this is the focus of study in this monograph. This brings together several important areas of mathematics, as for instance classical Kleinian group actions, complex hyperbolic geometry, chrystallographic groups and the uniformization problem for complex manifolds.​
The Ahlfors–Bers Colloquia commemorate the mathematical legacy of Lars Ahlfors and Lipman Bers. The core of this legacy lies in the fields of geometric function theory, Teichmüller theory, hyperbolic geometry, and partial differential equations. Today we see the influence of Ahlfors and Bers on algebraic geometry, mathematical physics, dynamics, probability, geometric group theory, number theory and topology. Recent years have seen a flowering of this legacy with an increased interest in their work. This current volume contains articles on a wide variety of subjects that are central to this legacy. These include papers in Kleinian groups, classical Riemann surface theory, Teichmüller theory, mapping class groups, geometric group theory, and statistical mechanics.
We live in a three-dimensional space; what sort of space is it? Can we build it from simple geometric objects? The answers to such questions have been found in the last 30 years, and Outer Circles describes the basic mathematics needed for those answers as well as making clear the grand design of the subject of hyperbolic manifolds as a whole. The purpose of Outer Circles is to provide an account of the contemporary theory, accessible to those with minimal formal background in topology, hyperbolic geometry, and complex analysis. The text explains what is needed, and provides the expertise to use the primary tools to arrive at a thorough understanding of the big picture. This picture is further filled out by numerous exercises and expositions at the ends of the chapters and is complemented by a profusion of high quality illustrations. There is an extensive bibliography for further study.
Over the past three decades there has been a total revolution in the classic branch of mathematics called 3-dimensional topology, namely the discovery that most solid 3-dimensional shapes are hyperbolic 3-manifolds. This book introduces and explains hyperbolic geometry and hyperbolic 3- and 2-dimensional manifolds in the first two chapters and then goes on to develop the subject. The author discusses the profound discoveries of the astonishing features of these 3-manifolds, helping the reader to understand them without going into long, detailed formal proofs. The book is heavily illustrated with pictures, mostly in color, that help explain the manifold properties described in the text. Each chapter ends with a set of exercises and explorations that both challenge the reader to prove assertions made in the text, and suggest further topics to explore that bring additional insight. There is an extensive index and bibliography.
This book presents the foundations of the theory of groups and semigroups acting isometrically on Gromov hyperbolic metric spaces. Particular emphasis is paid to the geometry of their limit sets and on behavior not found in the proper setting. The authors provide a number of examples of groups which exhibit a wide range of phenomena not to be found in the finite-dimensional theory. The book contains both introductory material to help beginners as well as new research results, and closes with a list of attractive unsolved problems.
The field of 3-manifold topology has made great strides forward since 1982 when Thurston articulated his influential list of questions. Primary among these is Perelman's proof of the Geometrization Conjecture, but other highlights include the Tameness Theorem of Agol and Calegari-Gabai, the Surface Subgroup Theorem of Kahn-Markovic, the work of Wise and others on special cube complexes, and, finally, Agol's proof of the Virtual Haken Conjecture. This book summarizes all these developments and provides an exhaustive account of the current state of the art of 3-manifold topology, especially focusing on the consequences for fundamental groups of 3-manifolds. As the first book on 3-manifold topology that incorporates the exciting progress of the last two decades, it will be an invaluable resource for researchers in the field who need a reference for these developments. It also gives a fast-paced introduction to this material. Although some familiarity with the fundamental group is recommended, little other previous knowledge is assumed, and the book is accessible to graduate students. The book closes with an extensive list of open questions which will also be of interest to graduate students and established researchers.
This monograph is a self-contained introduction to the geometry of Riemann Surfaces of constant curvature –1 and their length and eigenvalue spectra. It focuses on two subjects: the geometric theory of compact Riemann surfaces of genus greater than one, and the relationship of the Laplace operator with the geometry of such surfaces. Research workers and graduate students interested in compact Riemann surfaces will find here a number of useful tools and insights to apply to their investigations.
An accessible yet systematic account of reversibility that demonstrates its impact throughout many diverse areas of mathematics.
This monograph gives an overview of various classes of infinite-dimensional Lie groups and their applications in Hamiltonian mechanics, fluid dynamics, integrable systems, gauge theory, and complex geometry. The text includes many exercises and open questions.
This book is a printed edition of the Special Issue "Differential Geometrical Theory of Statistics" that was published in Entropy
Surgery theory, the basis for the classification theory of manifolds, is now about forty years old. There have been some extraordinary accomplishments in that time, which have led to enormously varied interactions with algebra, analysis, and geometry. Workers in many of these areas have often lamented the lack of a single source that surveys surgery theory and its applications. Indeed, no one person could write such a survey. The sixtieth birthday of C. T. C. Wall, one of the leaders of the founding generation of surgery theory, provided an opportunity to rectify the situation and produce a comprehensive book on the subject. Experts have written state-of-the-art reports that will be of broad interest to all those interested in topology, not only graduate students and mathematicians, but mathematical physicists as well. Contributors include J. Milnor, S. Novikov, W. Browder, T. Lance, E. Brown, M. Kreck, J. Klein, M. Davis, J. Davis, I. Hambleton, L. Taylor, C. Stark, E. Pedersen, W. Mio, J. Levine, K. Orr, J. Roe, J. Milgram, and C. Thomas.
Many of the important and creative developments in modern mathematics resulted from attempts to solve questions that originate in number theory. The publication of Emil Grosswald’s classic text presents an illuminating introduction to number theory. Combining the historical developments with the analytical approach, Topics from the Theory of Numbers offers the reader a diverse range of subjects to investigate.
This book is based on the full year Ph.D. qualifying course on differentiable manifolds, global calculus, differential geometry, and related topics, given by the author at Washington University several times over a twenty year period. It is addressed primarily to second year graduate students and well prepared first year students. Presupposed is a good grounding in general topology and modern algebra, especially linear algebra and the analogous theory of modules over a commutative, unitary ring. Although billed as a "first course" , the book is not intended to be an overly sketchy introduction. Mastery of this material should prepare the student for advanced topics courses and seminars in differen tial topology and geometry. There are certain basic themes of which the reader should be aware. The first concerns the role of differentiation as a process of linear approximation of non linear problems. The well understood methods of linear algebra are then applied to the resulting linear problem and, where possible, the results are reinterpreted in terms of the original nonlinear problem. The process of solving differential equations (i. e., integration) is the reverse of differentiation. It reassembles an infinite array of linear approximations, result ing from differentiation, into the original nonlinear data. This is the principal tool for the reinterpretation of the linear algebra results referred to above.
This book is an exposition of the theoretical foundations of hyperbolic manifolds. It is intended to be used both as a textbook and as a reference. Particular emphasis has been placed on readability and completeness of ar gument. The treatment of the material is for the most part elementary and self-contained. The reader is assumed to have a basic knowledge of algebra and topology at the first-year graduate level of an American university. The book is divided into three parts. The first part, consisting of Chap ters 1-7, is concerned with hyperbolic geometry and basic properties of discrete groups of isometries of hyperbolic space. The main results are the existence theorem for discrete reflection groups, the Bieberbach theorems, and Selberg's lemma. The second part, consisting of Chapters 8-12, is de voted to the theory of hyperbolic manifolds. The main results are Mostow's rigidity theorem and the determination of the structure of geometrically finite hyperbolic manifolds. The third part, consisting of Chapter 13, in tegrates the first two parts in a development of the theory of hyperbolic orbifolds. The main results are the construction of the universal orbifold covering space and Poincare's fundamental polyhedron theorem.
Focusing on Hamilton's Ricci flow, this volume begins with a detailed discussion of the required aspects of differential geometry. The discussion also includes existence and regularity theory, compactness theorems for Riemannian manifolds, and much more.

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