Essays on semiology
This issue of Art History explores new writing on the relationship of visual culture, music and performativity from late Romanticism to Modernity. It includes articles on Klimt's Beethoven frieze, Paul Klee's musical poetics, John Cage and Fluzuw, Max klinger and Romantic musical metaphysics, and the early musical subjects of Braque and Picasso.
The concept of textuality in recent decades has come to designate a fundamentally contested terrain within a number of academic disciplines. How it came to occupy this position is the subject of John Mowitt's book, a critical genealogy of the social and intellectual conditions that contributed to the emergence of the textual object. Beginning with the Tel Quel group in France in the sixties and seventies, Mowitt's study details how a certain interdisciplinary crisis prompted academics to rethink the conditions of cultural interpretation. Concentrating on three disciplinary projects—literary analysis, film studies, and musicology—Mowitt shows how textuality's emergence called into question not merely the relations among these disciplines, but also the cultural logic of disciplinary reason as such. At once an effort to define "the text" and to explore and extend the theory of textuality, this book illustrates why the notion of interdisciplinary research has recently acquired such urgency. At the same time, by emphasizing the genealogical dimension of the textual object, Mowitt raises the issues of its "antidisciplinary" character, and by extension its immediate pertinence for the current debates over multiculturalism and Eurocentrism. Innovative, historically astute and theoretically informed, this important book will be indispensable reading for all scholars in literary and cultural studies.
Literary Semiotics brings much needed revitalization to the conservatism of modern semiotic theory. Scott Simpkins' revisionist work scrutinizes the conflicting views on sign theory to identify new areas of development in semiotic thought and practice, particularly in relation to literary theory. Focusing on the idea of semiotics as a "conversation" about sign theory and practice, Simpkins principally looks at the work of Umberto Eco, while giving secondary attention to some of semiotics' most influential commentators: including Deleuze and Guattari, Lyotard, Foucault, Barthes, Kristeva, and Derrida. As an engaged interrogation of the restraints on the practice of semiotics, Literary Semiotics is a provocative study for semioticians, literary theorists, and scholars of cultural studies and a resource for students seeking a probing examination of the theory of signs.
The essays in this collection focus on one of the most influential yet confusing concepts in modern critical thinking, that of intertextuality. They present a wide-ranging, but cohesive theoretical framework within which media communication can be described and analyzed.
Roland Barthes remains one of the most influential cultural theorists of the postwar period and Image-Music-Text is his most widely taught work. Ed White provides students with a clear guide to this essential but difficult text. As students are increasingly expected to write across a range of media, Barthes' work can be understood as an early mapping of what we now call interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary study. The book's detailed section-by-section readings makes Barthes' most important writings accessible to undergraduate readers. This book is a perfect companion for teaching and learning Barthes ideas in cultural studies and literary theory.
The question of the relation between the visual and the textual in literature is at the heart of an increasing number of scholarly projects, and in turn, the investigation of evolving visual-verbal dynamics is becoming an independent discipline. This volume explores these profound literary shifts through the work of twelve talented, and in some cases, emerging scholars who study text and image relations in diverse forms and contexts. The inter-medial conjunctures investigated in this book play with and against the traditional roles of the visual and the verbal. The Future of Text and Image presents explorations of the incorporation of visual elements into works of literature, of visual writing modes, and of the textuality and literariness of images. It focuses on the special potential literature offers for the combination of these two functions. Alongside examinations of major forms and genres such as memoirs, novels, and poetry, this volume expands the discussion of text and image relations into more marginal forms, for instance, collage books, the PostSecret collections of anonymous postcards, and digital poetry. In other words, while exploring the destiny of text and image as an independent discipline, this volume simultaneously looks at the very literal future of text and image forms in an ever-changing technological reality. The essays in this book will help to define the emergent practices and politics of this growing field of study, and at the same time, reflect the tremendous significance of the visual in today’s image culture.
Transforming Type examines kinetic or moving type in a range of fields including film credits, television idents, interactive poetry and motion graphics. As the screen increasingly imitates the properties of real-life environments, typographic sequences are able to present letters that are active and reactive. These environments invite new discussions about the difference between motion and change, global and local transformation, and the relationship between word and image. In this illuminating study, Barbara Brownie explores the ways in which letterforms transform on screen, and the consequences of such transformations. Drawing on examples including Kyle Cooper's title sequence design, kinetic poetry and MPC's idents for the UK's Channel 4, she differentiates motion from other kinds of kineticism, with particular emphasis on the transformation of letterforms into other forms and objects, through construction, parallax and metamorphosis. She proposes that each of these kinetic behaviours requires us to revisit existing assumptions about the nature of alphabetic forms and the spaces in which they are found.
Faye ist Schriftstellerin und unterwegs, ihren neuen Roman vorzustellen. Für sie scheint diese Reise lebensentscheidend. Nicht nur hofft sie, endlich die ihr gebührende öffentliche Anerkennung zu finden, sie sucht vor allem Abstand zu einer privaten Katastrophe. Sie begegnet Kollegen, die sich um Kopf und Kragen reden, sie bestreitet Bühnengespräche, in denen man ihr nicht zuhört und sie gibt Interviews, ohne wirklich selbst zu Wort zu kommen. Doch je mehr sie sich auf die anderen einlässt, umso deutlicher wird Faye, was jenseits all der Geschichten und Fiktionen liegt, mit denen die Menschen sich fast obsessiv wappnen. Die Konsequenz, die Faye für sich daraus zieht, ist einleuchtend – führt sie aber geradewegs zurück in die Bodenlosigkeit ihrer persönlichen Situation. Was verbergen wir, indem wir uns zeigen? Und warum wissen wir am wenigsten über das, was uns am meisten bewegt? Rachel Cusk ist »eine originäre, eine geradezu philosophische Schriftstellerin.« (taz) und Kudos ein lebenskluger, beziehungsreicher Roman, erzählt mit schlichter Eleganz und häretischem Witz.
The Trespass of the Sign offers a clear and thorough account of the relations between deconstruction and theology. Kevin Hart argues that, contrary to popular thought on the topic, deconstruction does not have an antitheological agenda. Rather, deconstruction seeks to question the metaphysics of any theology. Hart pays particular attention to mystical theology as nonmetaphysical theology.
The Dynasty Years documents and analyses in detail 'the Dynasty phenomenon', the hotly debated success of the Hollywood-made 'Rolls Royce of a primetime soap' which heralded a profound transformation of European television. From the operatic camp of Krystle and Alexis' fight in the lilypond or the Moldavian wedding massacre to the unprecedented gay sub-plot, Dynasty represented, in the words of co-producer Esther Shapiro, "the ultimate dollhouse fantasy for middle-aged women". Using evidence from audience survey results, newspaper and magazine clippings and letters to broadcasters and drawing on semiotics, psychoanalysis, feminism and critical social theories, Jostein Gripsrud examines every aspect of Dynasty's production, reception and context. The result is a groundbreaking critical study. Jostein Gripsrud offers a theoretical but empirically grounded critique of many central positions in media studies, including notions of 'audience resistance' and the 'sovereign' audience and its freedom in meaning-making, arguing against what he perceives as the uncritical celebrations of the soap-opera genre in much contemporary media criticism.
The Narrative Reader provides a comprehensive survey of theories of narrative from Plato to Post-Structuralism. The selection of texts is bold and broad, demonstrating the extent to which narrative permeates the entire field of literature and culture. It shows the ways in which narrative crosses disciplines, continents and theoretical perspectives and is a long overdue and welcome addition to the field. Canonical texts are combined with texts which are difficult to get hold of elsewhere, and new translations and introductory material are presented. The texts cover many crucial issues and topic.
Die Bedeutung von Populären Kulturen sowie von Popkulturen kann nicht ohne einen Bezug auf Performativität und Medialität begriffen werden. Vor diesem Hintergrund geht es um die Beantwortung der Frage, inwieweit sich in Populären Kulturen sowie Popkulturen Aspekte, Prozesse, Transformationen, Manifestationen von Medialität und/oder Performativität niederschlagen, beobachten und beschreiben lassen, sie Populäre Kulturen sowie Popkulturen mit formen bzw. allererst durch Erscheinungen Populärer Kulturen sowie Popkulturen eine spezifische Bedeutung erhalten.
Historians are increasingly looking beyond the traditional, and turning to visual, oral, aural, and virtual sources to inform their work. The challenges these sources pose require new skills of interpretation and require historians to consider alternative theoretical and practical approaches. In order to help historians successfully move beyond traditional text, Sarah Barber and Corinna Peniston-Bird bring together chapters from historical specialists in the fields of fine art, photography, film, oral history, architecture, virtual sources, music, cartoons, landscape and material culture to explain why, when and how these less traditional sources can be used. Each chapter introduces the reader to the source, suggests the methodological and theoretical questions historians should keep in mind when using it, and provides case studies to illustrate best practice in analysis and interpretation. Pulling these disparate sources together, the introduction discusses the nature of historical sources and those factors which are unique to, and shared by, the sources covered throughout the book. Taking examples from around the globe, this collection of essays aims to inspire practitioners of history to expand their horizons, and incorporate a wide variety of primary sources in their work.

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