Unwilling to see Asian American women silenced beneath the noisy discourses of feminists, cultural nationalists, and Eurocentric historians, Wendy Ho turns to specific spoken stories of mothers and daughters. Against reductive tendencies of scholarship, she places her own conversations with her China-born grandmother and her U.S.-born mother and her own readings of other Asian American women writers. She finds in the writings of Maxine Hong Kingston, Amy Tan, and Fae Myenne Ng not only complex mother-daughter relationships but many-faceted relationships to fathers, family, community, and culture. Always resisting the simplistic explanations, In Her Mother's House brings Asian American women's experience as mothers and daughters to the forefront of gender and ethnicity.
In May 2009, the Sri Lankan army overwhelmed the last stronghold of the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam—better known as the Tamil Tigers—officially bringing an end to nearly three decades of civil war. Although the war has ended, the place of minorities in Sri Lanka remains uncertain, not least because the lengthy conflict drove entire populations from their homes. The figures are jarring: for example, all of the roughly 80,000 Muslims in northern Sri Lanka were expelled from the Tamil Tiger-controlled north, and nearly half of all Sri Lankan Tamils were displaced during the course of the civil war. Sharika Thiranagama's In My Mother's House provides ethnographic insight into two important groups of internally displaced people: northern Sri Lankan Tamils and Sri Lankan Muslims. Through detailed engagement with ordinary people struggling to find a home in the world, Thiranagama explores the dynamics within and between these two minority communities, describing how these relations were reshaped by violence, displacement, and authoritarianism. In doing so, she illuminates an often overlooked intraminority relationship and new social forms created through protracted war. In My Mother's House revolves around three major themes: ideas of home in the midst of profound displacement; transformations of familial experience; and the impact of the political violence—carried out by both the Tamil Tigers and the Sri Lankan state—on ordinary lives and public speech. Her rare focus on the effects and responses to LTTE political regulation and violence demonstrates that envisioning a peaceful future for post-conflict Sri Lanka requires taking stock of the new Tamil and Muslim identities forged by the civil war. These identities cannot simply be cast away with the end of the war but must be negotiated anew.
Interwoven accounts of the author's life and the life of her Russian-born mother, a leading Communist organizer in America, reveal a mother and daughter's attempts to make sense of one another's lives.
CHILDREN'S BOOKS/AGES 4-8
Black churches in America have long been recognized as the most independent, stable, and dominant institutions in black communities. In The Black Church in the African American Experience, based on a ten-year study, is the largest nongovernmental study of urban and rural churches ever undertaken and the first major field study on the subject since the 1930s. Drawing on interviews with more than 1,800 black clergy in both urban and rural settings, combined with a comprehensive historical overview of seven mainline black denominations, C. Eric Lincoln and Lawrence H. Mamiya present an analysis of the Black Church as it relates to the history of African Americans and to contemporary black culture. In examining both the internal structure of the Church and the reactions of the Church to external, societal changes, the authors provide important insights into the Church’s relationship to politics, economics, women, youth, and music. Among other topics, Lincoln and Mamiya discuss the attitude of the clergy toward women pastors, the reaction of the Church to the civil rights movement, the attempts of the Church to involve young people, the impact of the black consciousness movement and Black Liberation Theology and clergy, and trends that will define the Black Church well into the next century. This study is complete with a comprehensive bibliography of literature on the black experience in religion. Funding for the ten-year survey was made possible by the Lilly Endowment and the Ford Foundation.
There was this one time when I was going into the basement to finish my laundry when I saw Popcorn jump on the bed. Quick turned his back, and his friend, the little weasel, just sat there acting like he was watching TV. I asked what was going on and of course they said nothing, so I went outside only to learn that they were in the basement mixing up their drugs. They told me that Popcorn was paid to hold the stuff and if anyone came down stairs she should get rid of it. Why would she do this here; why would Quick have it here at all? He could have rented an apartment and had his shop set up there, but instead he decided to do his business from the house we grew up in; the house the neighborhood grew up in, IN MY MOTHER’S HOUSE.
A small, greenery-shrouded home in Los Angeles serves as backdrop to this stunning drama of a mother and daughter who grapple with their volatile relationship - and with life-threatening health crises in an adversarial system.
„Am 20. April 1999 betraten Dylan Klebold und Eric Harris ausgerüstet mit Gewehren und Sprengstoff die Columbine Highschool. Dort töteten sie zwölf Schüler und einen Lehrer, verletzten vierundzwanzig weitere Menschen und nahmen sich dann selbst das Leben. Es war der schlimmste Schul-Amoklauf der Geschichte. Dylan Klebold war mein Sohn.“ 16 Jahre nach dem Amoklauf ihres Sohnes Dylan erzählt Sue Klebold von ihrem Ringen mit der Frage, ob sie die Tat hätte verhindern können, wenn sie nur aufmerksamer, liebevoller gewesen wäre. Sue Klebold ist durch die Hölle gegangen, aber an der Tat ihres Sohnes nicht zerbrochen. Sie hat einen Weg gefunden weiterzuleben und hofft, anderen Eltern zu helfen, das zu verhindern, was sie selbst nicht aufhalten konnte. Von einem ist sie fest überzeugt: Elterliche Liebe allein reicht nicht aus, um Kinder und Jugendliche vor den Folgen unerkannter psychischer Erkrankungen zu schützen. Ein starkes Memoir einer Mutter, der das Unvorstellbare passiert ist. Sue Klebold spendet alle Einnahmen an Forschung und Hilfsorganisationen für Opfer und Angehörige psychisch Kranker.
Gail Straub, a leader in the human potential field, had helped thousands around the world find meaning and purpose in their lives, all the while sensing that something fundamental within her was missing. Many years after the premature death of her mother, she undertook a period of soul searching and came to believe that, like her mother and so many women of our time, she had overcorrected in the direction of the masculine, her "successful" life of outer accomplishment and committed social activism having come at the expense of a rich and satisfying inner life.Her search took her around the globe--to Africa, Bali, Russia, China, and Ireland--where she encountered the longing to retrieve sacred female wisdom among the women she met. Finding her way back to her innate female wisdom restored a sense of balance between external and internal worlds, activism and contemplation, and public and private realms and gave her a sense of equanimity that had eluded her for decades. Gail's poetic and heartfelt story is for anyone who has ever struggled to build and sustain an interior life in our driven and fast-paced society--and for mothers and daughters everywhere.
"Mother died at five fifty-eight." So begins this story of seven extraordinary children who, faced with the unknown terrors of an orphanage, decide not to report their mother's death. They bury her in the garden, telling people only that she's too sick to have visitors. Then a menacing stranger appears, claiming to be their father. He agrees to keep their secret-and from that moment the story moves relentlessly to its mesmerizing climax.
In this unique treatment of the Song of Solomon, Pastor Johnson unearths the mysteries of love, sex and marriage as the Creator intended them to be understood and enjoyed."--Tony Evans, senior pastor of Oak Cliff Bible Fellowship. (Practical Life)
In My Mother's House and Sido, Colette plays fictional variations on the themes of childhood, family, and, above all, her mother. Vividly alive, fond of cities, music, theater, and books, Sido devoted herself to her village, Saint-Saveur; to her garden, with its inhabitants and its animals; and, especially, to her children, particularly her youngest, whom she called Minet-Chéri. Unlike Gigi and Chéri, which focus largely on sexual love and its repercussions, My Mother's House and Sido center on the compelling figure of a powerful, nurturing woman in late-nineteenth-century rural France, conveying the impact she had on her community and on her daughter -- who grew up to be a great writer.
»Warum haben Sie keine Kinder?« Diese »Mutter aller Fragen« wird Rebecca Solnit hartnäckig von Journalisten gestellt, die sich mehr für ihren Bauch als für ihre Bücher interessieren. Warum gilt Mutterschaft noch immer als Schlüssel zur weiblichen Identität? Die Autorin findet die Antwort darauf in der Ideologie des Glücks und tritt dafür ein, lieber nach Sinn als nach Glück zu streben. Außerdem erklärt sie in ihren Essays, warum die Geschichte des Schweigens mit der Geschichte der Frauen untrennbar verknüpft ist, warum fünfjährige Jungen auf rosa Spielzeug lieber verzichten, und nennt 80 Bücher, die keine Frau lesen sollte. Sie schreibt über Männer, die Feministen und Männer, die Vergewaltiger sind, und setzt sich gegen jegliches Schubladendenken zur Wehr. Wenn Männer mir die Welt erklären sorgte weltweit für Furore – in ihren neuen Essays setzt Rebecca Solnit ebenso scharfsichtig wie humorvoll ihre Erkundung der heutigen Geschlechterverhältnisse fort. Ein wichtiges, Mut machendes Buch aus dezidiert feministischer Perspektive, über und für alle, die Geschlechteridentitäten infrage stellen und für eine freiere Welt eintreten.
A unique, positive collection of essays profiles a number of forgotten female Jewish leaders who played key roles in various American social and political movements, from suffrage and birth control to civil rights and fair labor practices. 10,000 first printing.
Author Meredith Fields' formerly placid suburban existence is shattering, and she's not entirely unhappy about it. She feels guilty over placing her mother, Katherine, in a nursing home. Her husband, Keith, wants a divorce. She's emotionally estranged from her children. And her next book is overdue. As she sorts through her mother's house before selling, she finds clues to Katherine's shadowy past. She begins to understand why her mother related so poorly to her children and is shaken by parallels in her relationships with her own children. When Meredith finds a journal she kept in her twenties, she is reminded of the love she once felt for Keith, and the extent of her loss settles in. A series of crises forces them to confront their relationship, but will it be enough to put Meredith on the path to mending her shattered family and life? Back in my school days, I loved English and creative writing best. The practical people in my life nudged me toward a more secure profession, nursing. But I continued to write. Newsletters, magazine articles, and private journals and stories filled the gap. I took several writing courses at local colleges and through on-line programs (such as Writers Digest University) to hone my fiction skills before diving into my first novel, Autumn Colors. Having recently completed In Her Mother's Shoes, I'm juggling writing a third book around my day job, a three hour round trip commute, and training for marathons and half marathons. I live in the Adirondacks in New York State with my husband, Dennis, and Border Terrier, Nala. We can be found frequently paddling our canoe on lakes and rivers, cross country skiing, or climbing one of the beautiful mountains surrounding us. My novels come from real life experiences - some my own, some from people close to me, and sometimes just from someone I've observed. The settings are places I know and love. I maintain an active presence on social media, blog several times per month - usually about writing-related topics - and keep my website fresh and current.For my first novel, Autumn Colors, I enjoyed meeting with book clubs and speaking for local groups. I also maintain an email mailing list to keep readers aware of changes in my website (www.dawnlajeunesse.com) and upcoming activities.
The author of this book relates a life-long passion and love for her Cornish family home, Carn Voel, in Porthcurno, the home her mother Dora chose for herself and her husband, Bertrand Russell. This story of Dora's house, now the home of her children, reveals that Dora, equally influential in her children's lives, was a leading feminist thinker, author and educationalist in her own right.
A stunning new novel--full of wit and warmth--from the bestselling author of The Mango Season. In trendy Silicon Valley, Priya has everything she needs--a loving husband, a career, and a home--but the one thing she wants most is the child she's unable to have. In a Southern Indian village, Asha doesn't have much--raising two children in a tiny hut, she and her husband can barely keep a tin roof over their heads--but she wants a better education for her gifted son. Pressured by her family, Asha reluctantly checks into the Happy Mothers House: a baby farm where she can rent her only asset--her womb--to a childless couple overseas. To the dismay of friends and family, Priya places her faith in a woman she's never met to make her dreams of motherhood come true. Together, the two women discover the best and the worst that India's rising surrogacy industry has to offer, bridging continents and cultures to bring a new life into the world--and renewed hope to each other.
In How I Discovered My Mother Was A Goddess, Beverly Charles, tells the poignant story of aging and dementia from the point of view of both the parent and child. At some times troubling and other times darkly comic, it provides a vision of a spiritual journey, one that is healing, authentic, and satisfying. In addition to offering us the story of a mother and daughter as they struggle with old age and death, Beverly moves more deeply into the psyche to understand the goddesses at work in herself and her mother during the various phases of life. We journey through the author's and her mother's relationship to each other and to eight goddesses - Artemis, Hestia, Aphrodite, Athena, Demeter, Persephone, Hera, and Mary. By taking us on this odyssey with her, she not only deepens our understanding of the feminine and the goddesses that personify it, but reveals how these goddesses manifest in everyday life. This story enhances our understanding of the divine feminine. This book is for all those who have loved ones experiencing any form of dementia - as our intellectual connection diminishes, may we become more connected in our hearts. This book is also for women and the men who love them - may we never be ashamed of the journey that brings us home to the goddess within.
Without her mothers knowledge, in the midst of post-partum depression and dealing with bi-polar disorder, a young mother travels to Utah and end up relinquishing her parental rights to an adoption agency utilizing illegal adoption practices. No limit to a Mothers love tells of one grandmothers fight to regain custody of her grandchild. Dealing with the death of her own mother as well as her daughters emotional issues, Maria Dorden courageously entered into a fight with the adoption agency and the State of Utah. Her courage, determination, and love of her children and grandchildren ultimately lead to triumph.

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