Unwilling to see Asian American women silenced beneath the noisy discourse of feminists, cultural nationalists, and Eurocentric historians, Wendy Ho turns to spoken stories of mothers and daughters. In this text, she brings Asian American women's experience to the forefront of gender and ethnicity.
Interwoven accounts of the author's life and the life of her Russian-born mother, a leading Communist organizer in America, reveal a mother and daughter's attempts to make sense of one another's lives.
There was this one time when I was going into the basement to finish my laundry when I saw Popcorn jump on the bed. Quick turned his back, and his friend, the little weasel, just sat there acting like he was watching TV. I asked what was going on and of course they said nothing, so I went outside only to learn that they were in the basement mixing up their drugs. They told me that Popcorn was paid to hold the stuff and if anyone came down stairs she should get rid of it. Why would she do this here; why would Quick have it here at all? He could have rented an apartment and had his shop set up there, but instead he decided to do his business from the house we grew up in; the house the neighborhood grew up in, IN MY MOTHER’S HOUSE.
A fascinating look at compulsive hoarding by a woman whose mother suffers from the disease. To be the child of a compulsive hoarder is to live in a permanent state of unease. Because if my mother is one of those crazy junk-house people, then what does that make me? When her divorced mother was diagnosed with cancer, New York City writer Jessie Sholl returned to her hometown of Minneapolis to help her prepare for her upcoming surgery and get her affairs in order. While a daunting task for any adult dealing with an aging parent, it’s compounded for Sholl by one lifelong, complex, and confounding truth: her mother is a compulsive hoarder. Dirty Secret is a daughter’s powerful memoir of confronting her mother’s disorder, of searching for the normalcy that was never hers as a child, and, finally, cleaning out the clutter of her mother’s home in the hopes of salvaging the true heart of their relationship—before it’s too late. Growing up, young Jessie knew her mother wasn’t like other mothers: chronically disorganized, she might forgo picking Jessie up from kindergarten to spend the afternoon thrift store shopping. Now, tracing the downward spiral in her mother’s hoarding behavior to the death of a long-time boyfriend, she bravely wades into a pathological sea of stuff: broken appliances, moldy cowboy boots, twenty identical pairs of graying bargain-bin sneakers, abandoned arts and crafts, newspapers, magazines, a dresser drawer crammed with discarded eyeglasses, shovelfuls of junk mail . . . the things that become a hoarder’s “treasures.” With candor, wit, and not a drop of sentimentality, Jessie Sholl explores the many personal and psychological ramifications of hoarding while telling an unforgettable mother-daughter tale.
Three adopted children experience the joys and challenges of being raised in a home with two mothers, who teach the children that different doesn't mean wrong.
Vividly remembering her uncle's viola lessons and other elements from their Vienna home, Elizabeth becomes increasingly obsessed in her need to understand why her mother, Jenny, refuses to discuss the family's experiences during World War II. Reprint. 15,000 first printing.
In My Mother's House and Sido, Colette plays fictional variations on the themes of childhood, family, and, above all, her mother. Vividly alive, fond of cities, music, theater, and books, Sido devoted herself to her village, Saint-Saveur; to her garden, with its inhabitants and its animals; and, especially, to her children, particularly her youngest, whom she called Minet-Chéri. Unlike Gigi and Chéri, which focus largely on sexual love and its repercussions, My Mother's House and Sido center on the compelling figure of a powerful, nurturing woman in late-nineteenth-century rural France, conveying the impact she had on her community and on her daughter -- who grew up to be a great writer.
In May 2009, the Sri Lankan army overwhelmed the last stronghold of the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam—better known as the Tamil Tigers—officially bringing an end to nearly three decades of civil war. Although the war has ended, the place of minorities in Sri Lanka remains uncertain, not least because the lengthy conflict drove entire populations from their homes. The figures are jarring: for example, all of the roughly 80,000 Muslims in northern Sri Lanka were expelled from the Tamil Tiger-controlled north, and nearly half of all Sri Lankan Tamils were displaced during the course of the civil war. Sharika Thiranagama's In My Mother's House provides ethnographic insight into two important groups of internally displaced people: northern Sri Lankan Tamils and Sri Lankan Muslims. Through detailed engagement with ordinary people struggling to find a home in the world, Thiranagama explores the dynamics within and between these two minority communities, describing how these relations were reshaped by violence, displacement, and authoritarianism. In doing so, she illuminates an often overlooked intraminority relationship and new social forms created through protracted war. In My Mother's House revolves around three major themes: ideas of home in the midst of profound displacement; transformations of familial experience; and the impact of the political violence—carried out by both the Tamil Tigers and the Sri Lankan state—on ordinary lives and public speech. Her rare focus on the effects and responses to LTTE political regulation and violence demonstrates that envisioning a peaceful future for post-conflict Sri Lanka requires taking stock of the new Tamil and Muslim identities forged by the civil war. These identities cannot simply be cast away with the end of the war but must be negotiated anew.
Acclaimed author Lauren Slater ruminates on what it means to be family. Lauren Slater’s rocky childhood left her cold to the idea of ever creating a family of her own, but a husband, two dogs, two children, and three houses later, she came around to the challenges, trials, and unexpected rewards of playing house. Boldly honest, these biographical pieces reveal Slater at her wittiest and most deeply personal. She describes her journey from fiercely independent young woman to wife and mother, all while coping with mental illness. She tells of a chemical fire that rekindled the flame in her ailing relationship with her husband; she reflects on her decision to have an abortion, and then later to have children despite suffering from severe depression; she examines sex, love, mastectomies, and how nannies can be intrusive while dogs become family. Beautifully written, often humorous, and always revealing, these stories scrutinize the complex questions surrounding family life, offering up sometimes uncomfortable truths.
"Mom, I'm gay." With three little words, gay children can change their parents' lives forever. Yet at the same times it's a chance for those parents to realize nothing, really, has changed at all; same kid, same life, same bond of enduring love. Twenty years ago, during a walk on a Mississippi beach, Ellen DeGeneres spoke those simple, powerful words to her mother. That emotional moment eventually brought mother and daughter closer than ever, but not without a struggle. Coming from a republican family with conservative values, Betty needed time and education to understand her daughter's homosexuality -- but her ultimate acceptance would set the stage for a far more public coming out, one that would change history. In Love, Ellen, Betty DeGeneres tells her story; the complicated path to acceptance and the deepening of her friendship with her daughter; the media's scrutiny of their family life; the painful and often inspiring stories she's heard on the road as the first non-gay spokesperson for the Human Rights Campaigns National Coming Out Project. With a mother's love, clear minded common sense, and hard won wisdom, Betty DeGeneres offers up her own very personal memoir to help parents understand their gay children, and to help sons and daughters who have been rejected by their families feel less alone.
As her son grows up from little boy to adult man, a mother secretly rocks him each night as he sleeps.
The mother-daughter connection is unlike any other, and while that special bond can often be filled with beauty and light, it can also take a dark turn and become abusive. A negative maternal experience is, sadly, very difficult for women to talk about. In "Juanita and the House of Mirrors: My Journey through the Mother-Daughter Phenomenon," author Joy Richardson shares her difficult upbringing and the complex and painful relationship she had with her mother as well as relaying some stories shared with her by other women detailing their own mother-daughter experience. Insightful and rigorously honest, Richardson's tales of her young life are grim accounts of abuse-both physical and mental-that convey the darkness of years spent in deep disconnection. While they may be uncomfortable, these pages also offer power, healing, hope, and even a little humor to the lives of those who may be struggling to come to terms with an unfinished maternal relationship.
Shyama, a forty-eight-year-old London divorcée, already has an unruly teenage daughter, but that doesn't stop her and her younger lover, Toby, from wanting a child together. Their relationship may look like a cliché, but despite the news from her doctor that she no longer has any viable eggs, Shyama's not ready to give up on their dream of having a baby. So they decide to find an Indian surrogate to carry their child, which is how they meet Mala, a young woman trapped in an oppressive marriage in a small Indian town from which she's desperate to escape. But as the pregnancy progresses, they discover that their simple arrangement may be far more complicated than it seems. In The House of Hidden Mothers, Meera Syal, an acclaimed British actress and accomplished novelist, takes on the timely but underexplored issue of India's booming surrogacy industry. Western couples pay a young woman to have their child and then fly home with a baby, an easy narrative that ignores the complex emotions involved in carrying a child. Syal turns this phenomenon into a compelling, thoughtful novel already hailed in the UK as "rumbustious, confrontational and ultimately heartbreaking . . . Turn[s] the standard British-Asian displacement narrative on its head" (The Guardian). Compulsively readable and with a winning voice, The House of Hidden Mothers deftly explores subjects of age, class, and the divide between East and West.
In the spring of 1983 Terry Tempest Williams learned that her mother was dying of cancer. That same season, The Great Salt Lake began to rise to record heights, threatening the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge and the herons, owls, and snowy egrets that Williams, a poet and naturalist, had come to gauge her life by. One event was nature at its most random, the other a by-product of rogue technology: Terry's mother, and Terry herself, had been exposed to the fallout of atomic bomb tests in the 1950s. As it interweaves these narratives of dying and accommodation, Refuge transforms tragedy into a document of renewal and spiritual grace, resulting in a work that has become a classic.
A woman on a mission gets sidetracked by love in this irresistible story from #1 New York Times bestselling author Nora Roberts. Gwen Lacrosse has no reason to doubt that famous novelist and infamous womanizer Luke Powers is taking advantage—romantically—of her mother. His name is mentioned in fawning terms all over her mother’s letters to Gwen, which is why she now finds herself jetting from Manhattan to her hometown on the outskirts of New Orleans. But her mother’s new boarder is not what Gwen imagined. With an uncomplicated masculinity and searing wit, Luke makes her feel like she’s losing all of her dependable common sense—and all of her inhibitions... A NORA ROBERTS CLASSIC AVAILABLE DIGITALLY FOR THE FIRST TIME
The instant #1 New York Times bestseller--now a major motion picture starring Amandla Stenberg as Maddy and Nick Robinson as Olly. Risk everything . . . for love. What if you couldn’t touch anything in the outside world? Never breathe in the fresh air, feel the sun warm your face . . . or kiss the boy next door? In Everything, Everything, Maddy is a girl who’s literally allergic to the outside world, and Olly is the boy who moves in next door . . . and becomes the greatest risk she’s ever taken. My disease is as rare as it is famous. Basically, I’m allergic to the world. I don’t leave my house, have not left my house in seventeen years. The only people I ever see are my mom and my nurse, Carla. But then one day, a moving truck arrives next door. I look out my window, and I see him. He's tall, lean and wearing all black—black T-shirt, black jeans, black sneakers, and a black knit cap that covers his hair completely. He catches me looking and stares at me. I stare right back. His name is Olly. Maybe we can’t predict the future, but we can predict some things. For example, I am certainly going to fall in love with Olly. It’s almost certainly going to be a disaster. Everything, Everything will make you laugh, cry, and feel everything in between. It's an innovative, inspiring, and heartbreakingly romantic debut novel that unfolds via vignettes, diary entries, illustrations, and more. The movie is available on digital now! everythingeverythingfilm on Instagram @everythingfilm on Twitter @everythingeverythingmovie on Facebook everythingeverythingmovie.com And don’t miss Nicola Yoon's The Sun Is Also A Star, the #1 New York Times bestseller in which two teens are brought together just when it seems like the universe is sending them in opposite directions.
A psychoanalyst draws on her own clinical practice to help women break a pattern of endless cycles of blame and forgiveness toward their mothers
Author Meredith Fields' formerly placid suburban existence is shattering, and she's not entirely unhappy about it. She feels guilty over placing her mother, Katherine, in a nursing home. Her husband, Keith, wants a divorce. She's emotionally estranged from her children. And her next book is overdue. As she sorts through her mother's house before selling, she finds clues to Katherine's shadowy past. She begins to understand why her mother related so poorly to her children and is shaken by parallels in her relationships with her own children. When Meredith finds a journal she kept in her twenties, she is reminded of the love she once felt for Keith, and the extent of her loss settles in. A series of crises forces them to confront their relationship, but will it be enough to put Meredith on the path to mending her shattered family and life? Back in my school days, I loved English and creative writing best. The practical people in my life nudged me toward a more secure profession, nursing. But I continued to write. Newsletters, magazine articles, and private journals and stories filled the gap. I took several writing courses at local colleges and through on-line programs (such as Writers Digest University) to hone my fiction skills before diving into my first novel, Autumn Colors. Having recently completed In Her Mother's Shoes, I'm juggling writing a third book around my day job, a three hour round trip commute, and training for marathons and half marathons. I live in the Adirondacks in New York State with my husband, Dennis, and Border Terrier, Nala. We can be found frequently paddling our canoe on lakes and rivers, cross country skiing, or climbing one of the beautiful mountains surrounding us. My novels come from real life experiences - some my own, some from people close to me, and sometimes just from someone I've observed. The settings are places I know and love. I maintain an active presence on social media, blog several times per month - usually about writing-related topics - and keep my website fresh and current.For my first novel, Autumn Colors, I enjoyed meeting with book clubs and speaking for local groups. I also maintain an email mailing list to keep readers aware of changes in my website (www.dawnlajeunesse.com) and upcoming activities.
Hill House adalah rumah terpencil yang ganjil nan angker. Ukiran dan lukisan di dalamnya seolah-olah mengamatimu ke mana pun kau pergi, pintu-pintu selalu tertutup sendiri, dan kau selalu merasakan dingin yang menggigit meski duduk di dekat perapian. Setiap malam, terdengar suara langkah kaki di koridor, dan ketukan-ketukan kasar di pintu, padahal ketika diperiksa, tidak ada siapa-siapa. Tidak ada orang waras yang sudi tinggal di sana… Namun rumor-rumor seram Hill House malah menarik perhatian Dr. Montague, seorang akademisi yang ingin melakukan penelitian tentang aktifitas-aktifitas supernatural. Dia pun mengundang tiga orang asisten, Eleanor, Theodora, dan Luke, untuk tinggal di Hill House selama musim panas. Awalnya gangguan-gangguan makhluk halus yang mereka alami masih bisa ditolerir, tapi ketika Eleanor mulai mendengar suara-suara tanpa wujud yang membisikkan namanya, dan coretan cat merah di dinding yang memintanya pulang, keadaan mulai di luar kendali. Dr. Montague harus bertindak cepat jika tidak ingin jatuh korban nyawa. The Haunting of Hill House dianggap sebagai salah satu kisah horor terbaik abad ke-20. Novel ini telah dua kali diadaptasi menjadi film layar lebar, yakni tahun 1963 dan 1999. Versi tahun 1999 dibintangi oleh Liam Neeson, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Owen Wilson, dan Lili Taylor.

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