Norman O. Brown was a scholar, poet and revolutionary who made a lasting impression on the sixties generation. His distinctive fusion of Marxism, psychoanalysis and classical literature inspired students across the United States and in Europe to participate in the political upheaval of that time. His books, including Love’s Body and Life Against Death, are still being used in college classrooms throughout the country. This memorial volume has two sections, the first presenting a previously unpublished autobiographical essay in which Brown details both his family and intellectual background prior to arriving in the United States at the University of Chicago. The second section contains a number of short meditations on his life and work by friends, family and colleagues. The pieces are poetic and insightful, a true testimony to the kind of thinking Brown inspired. They were presented originally during a memorial gathering at the University of California Santa Cruz, which included, among others, his colleagues there: Carl E. Schorske, Jay Cantor, Hayden White, Helene Moglen, Jim Clifford and Nathaniel Mackey.
Since the Korean Wara the forgotten wara more than a million Korean women have acted as sex workers for U.S. servicemen. More than 100,000 women married GIs and moved to the United States. Through intellectual vigor and personal recollection, Haunting the Korean Diaspora explores the repressed history of emotional and physical violence between the United States and Korea and the unexamined reverberations of sexual relationships between Korean women and American soldiers.
This rich and elegant work describes how the unsettled cultural climate provided fertile soil for the flourishing of elegy. John Rosenberg shows how the phenomenon of elegy pervaded the writing of the period, tracing it through the voices of individuals from Carlyle, Tennyson, Darwin and Ruskin, to Swinburne, Pater, Dickens and Hopkins. Finally, he turns from particular elegists to a common experience that touched them all - the displacement of the older idea of the earthly city as a New Jerusalem by the rise of a new image of the Victorian city as an industrial Inferno, a wasteland of sprawling towns and of rivers so polluted they caught on fire.
In this characteristically sexy, daring, and hyperliterate novel, Kathy Acker interweaves the stories of three characters who share the same tragic flaw: a predilection for doomed, obsessive love. Rimbaud, the delinquent symbolist prodigy, is deserted by his lover Verlaine time and time again. Airplane takes a job dancing at Fun City, the seventh tier of the sex industry, in order to support her good-for-nothing boyfriend. And Capitol feels alive only when she's having sex with her brother,Quentin. In Memoriam to Identity is at once a revelatory addition to, and an irreverent critique of, the literature of decadence and self-destruction.
Reassesses the case for single authorship via an innovative statistical analysis that reveals significant stylistic differences between Luke and Acts.
Reassessing the long-accepted division between religion and enlightenment, Ana Acosta here traces a tissue of readings and adaptations of Genesis and Scriptural language from Milton through Rousseau to Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley. Acosta's interdisciplinary approach places these writers in the broader context of eighteenth-century political theory, biblical criticism, religious studies and utopianism. Establishing the relationship between biblical criticism and republican utopias, Acosta shows that important utopian visions are better understood against the background of Genesis interpretation.
Fully revised, and including a new chapter, this is a welcome new edition of a psychoanalytic classic. The extraordinary autobiography of a woman who has had Jungian, Freudian and Kleinian analyses, My Kleinian Home depicts Nini Herman's life as an odyssey full of familial, historical and personal distress. She bravely and honestly discusses her experiences as a German Jew in the 1930s, the death of a child, and her constant search for the resolution of her childhood traumas, and brings an unusual clarity to the assumptions and experience of Kleinian psychoanalysis.
Winner of the Anna Balakian Prize 2016 Is poetry lost in translation, or is it perhaps the other way around? Is it found? Gained? Won? What happens when a poet decides to give his favorite Russian poems a new life in English? Are the new texts shadows, twins or doppelgangers of their originals-or are they something completely different? Does the poet resurrect himself from the death of the author by reinterpreting his own work in another language, or does he turn into a monster: a bilingual, bicultural centaur? Alexandra Berlina, herself a poetry translator and a 2012 Barnstone Translation Prize laureate, addresses these questions in this new study of Joseph Brodsky, whose Nobel-prize-winning work has never yet been discussed from this perspective.
Based on a case study of a particular countryside and town in southern England—namely, the county of Wiltshire and the city of Salisbury—this record seeks to explore the changing nature of English society during the period from 1380 to 1520. It examines the influence of landscape and population on the agriculture of Wiltshire, the regional patterns of arable and pastoral farming, and the growing contrast between the large-scale mixed farming of the chalklands and the family farms of the claylands. Discussing how economic growth generated problems of its own, this study is the first to fully investigate Wiltshire’s agriculture history during the late Middle Ages, a period recognized as one of considerable change.
In 1861 at the age of eighteen, Edward Woolsey Bacon, a Yale student and son of well-known abolitionist minister Leonard Bacon, left his home in New Haven, Connecticut, to fight for the United States. Over the next four years Bacon served in both the Union navy and army, which gave him a sweeping view of the Civil War. His postings included being a captain’s clerk on the USS Iroquois, a hospital clerk in his hometown, a captain in the 29th Connecticut Infantry (Colored), and a major in the 117th U.S. Colored Infantry, and he described these experiences in vibrant letters to his friends and family. Historian George S. Burkhardt has compiled these letters, as well as Bacon’s diary in the impressive Double Duty in the Civil War: The Letters of Sailor and Soldier Edward W. Bacon. Bacon tells of hunting Confederate commerce raiders on the high seas, enduring the tedium of blockade duty, and taking part in riverine warfare on the Mississippi. He recalls sweating in South Carolina as an infantry officer during drill and picket duty, suffering constant danger in the battlefield trenches of Virginia, marching victoriously on fallen Richmond, and tolerating the boredom of occupation duty in Texas. His highly entertaining letters shed new light on naval affairs and reveal a close-knit family life. The narrative of his duty with black troops is especially valuable, since few first-hand accounts from white officers of the U.S. Colored Troops exist. Furthermore, his beliefs about race, slavery, and the Union cause were unconventional for the time and stand in contrast to those held by many of his contemporaries. Double Duty in the Civil War is filled with lively descriptions of the men Bacon met and the events he experienced. With Burkhardt’s careful editing and useful annotations, Bacon’s letters and diary excerpts give rare insight into areas of the Civil War that have been neglected because of a lack of available sources. Given the scarcity of eyewitness testimonies to navy life and life in African American regiments, this book is a rarity indeed.
Papers of a conference held in Munich in 2004 in memory of Hans J. Morgenthau.
Professor Lal has been remarkably successful in combining scholarship with autobiography in Mr Tulsi’s Store. In the essays which cover the author’s childhood and education up to university, diligent scholarship combines with evocative autobiographical details to reveal a philosophical pattern that encompasses the experience of the descendants of all Indian indentured workers everywhere. Professor Frank Birbalsingh, York University, Canada.

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