Norman O. Brown was a scholar, poet and revolutionary who made a lasting impression on the sixties generation. His distinctive fusion of Marxism, psychoanalysis and classical literature inspired students across the United States and in Europe to participate in the political upheaval of that time. His books, including Love’s Body and Life Against Death, are still being used in college classrooms throughout the country. This memorial volume has two sections, the first presenting a previously unpublished autobiographical essay in which Brown details both his family and intellectual background prior to arriving in the United States at the University of Chicago. The second section contains a number of short meditations on his life and work by friends, family and colleagues. The pieces are poetic and insightful, a true testimony to the kind of thinking Brown inspired. They were presented originally during a memorial gathering at the University of California Santa Cruz, which included, among others, his colleagues there: Carl E. Schorske, Jay Cantor, Hayden White, Helene Moglen, Jim Clifford and Nathaniel Mackey.
Celebrating the Arthur Miller centennial year, an eye-catching new Penguin Plays edition of the work that established him as a leading voice in the American theater In 1947, Arthur Miller exploded onto Broadway with his first major work, All My Sons, winning both the New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award for Best New Play and the Tony for Best Author. The play introduced themes that would preoccupy Miller throughout his career: the relationships between fathers and sons and the conflict between business and personal ethics. This striking new edition adds All My Sons to the elegant Penguin Plays series—now in beautifully redesigned covers. Joe Keller and Steve Deever, partners in a machine shop during World War II, turned out defective airplane parts, causing the deaths of many men. Deever was sent to prison while Keller escaped punishment and went back to business, making himself very wealthy in the ensuing years. A love affair between Keller’s son, Chris, and Ann Deever, Steve’s daughter; the bitterness of George Deever, who returns from the war to find his father in prison and his father’s partner free; and the reaction of Chris Keller to his father’s guilt escalate toward a climax of electrifying intensity. From the Trade Paperback edition.
This rich and elegant work describes how the unsettled cultural climate provided fertile soil for the flourishing of elegy. John Rosenberg shows how the phenomenon of elegy pervaded the writing of the period, tracing it through the voices of individuals from Carlyle, Tennyson, Darwin and Ruskin, to Swinburne, Pater, Dickens and Hopkins. Finally, he turns from particular elegists to a common experience that touched them all - the displacement of the older idea of the earthly city as a New Jerusalem by the rise of a new image of the Victorian city as an industrial Inferno, a wasteland of sprawling towns and of rivers so polluted they caught on fire.
In this characteristically sexy, daring, and hyperliterate novel, Kathy Acker interweaves the stories of three characters who share the same tragic flaw: a predilection for doomed, obsessive love. Rimbaud, the delinquent symbolist prodigy, is deserted by his lover Verlaine time and time again. Airplane takes a job dancing at Fun City, the seventh tier of the sex industry, in order to support her good-for-nothing boyfriend. And Capitol feels alive only when she's having sex with her brother,Quentin. In Memoriam to Identity is at once a revelatory addition to, and an irreverent critique of, the literature of decadence and self-destruction.
A further new title in this series on East African oral literature, considering East African-Indian genres of oral literature and cultures, which developed as people from India/Asia migrated to East Africa. The authors discuss how these literatures have been a source of creativity and renewal; and how they give expression to the values, perceptions and aspirations of cultures. The book is organised into sections on the socio-cultural background and historical origins of the literatures; patterns of migration and settlement in East Africa; styles in Indian literature as preserved in East Africa, common symbols, images and figures of speech; the role of the artist in literary production; and performance of oral literature. The authors further provide and discuss narratives from many genres: e.g. myths, legends, animal tales, moral stories; tales of wisdom and wit; riddles, proverbs and songs. Many passages appear in the original languages, transcribed from primary sources - in particular Gujerati; also Sindhi, Punjabi, Cutchi, Hindi, Kondani - as well as in English translation.
Reassesses the case for single authorship via an innovative statistical analysis that reveals significant stylistic differences between Luke and Acts.

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