In this vastly important, widely-acclaimed volume, Appiah, a Ghanaian philosopher who now teaches at Harvard, explores what it means to be an African American, on the many preconceptions that have muddled discussions of face, Africa, and Afrocentrism since the end of the 19th century. A New York Times Notable Book of the Year.
For two sisters growing up surrounded by the Civil War, there is conflict both outside and inside their house.
In this true tale, Molly, now a grandmother in her seventies, tells the story of her real-life experiences in the sex trade in a series of graphic and lurid flash-backs. As the tranquil world of this mature and seemingly well-balanced woman is suddenly shattered by unexpected outbursts of bizarre and debilitating behavior, Molly’s daughter, Carin, is totally bewildered by her mother's strange antics. Carin has always had a good relationship with her mother, but knows nothing of Molly’s past. Molly’s friends are equally confused, but little by little, her story becomes clear: how Molly became enamored of the sex trade and how that lifestyle was deeply ingrained in her personality. Her journey into darkness is long and arduous. Exposed to sex far too soon because of her mother’s poor influence and bad example, Molly grew up around sex workers who groomed her for “the life.” Patrons exploited and abused her. When her father returned from his service in World War II, she hoped that he would help her off the path she had taken—only to have her dreams shattered. Instead of protecting her, he took advantage of her youth and promiscuity for his own financial gain. Molly is forced to do the unthinkable to gain control of her life. Told from the perspective of a survivor looking back and recovering from her experiences, In My Father’s House offers a unique and heartrending view of a girl growing up in the shadows of the sex trade.
Kassian thoroughly explores the deeply meaningful metaphor of God as the perfect and loving Father.
Documents the tragic story of the Layton family's--Lisa, Deborah and Larry--involvement in the Jonestown mass suicide and the airport murders
For his final new series, New York Times mega-bestselling author E. Lynn Harris introduces Bentley L. Dean, owner of the hottest modeling agency in Miami's sexy South Beach. Only the world's most beautiful models make the roster of Picture Perfect Modeling agency and they only do shoots for the most elite photographers and magazines. They are fashionista royalty—and the owners, Bentley L. Dean and his beautiful partner Alexandra, know it. But even Picture Perfect isn't immune from hard times, so when Sterling Sneed, a rich, celebrity party planner promises to pay a ludicrously high fee for some models, Bentley finds he can't refuse. Even though the job is not exactly a photo shoot, Bentley agrees to supply fifteen gorgeous models as eye candy for an "A" list party—to look good, be charming and, well, entertain the guests. They don't have to do anything they don't want to, but... His models are pros and he figures they can handle the pressure, until one drops out and Bentley asks his protégé Jah, a beautiful kid who Bentley treats as if he were his own son, to substitute. Suddenly, the stakes are much higher, particularly when Jah falls in love with the hottest African American movie star in America. Seth Sinclair is very handsome, very famous, and very married—and his closeted gay life makes him very dangerous as well. Can Bentley's fatherly guidance save Jah from making a fatal mistake?
Car accidents, illnesses, falls, and temper tantrums that's what author Valinda Johnson was facing when she decided to become her elderly father's caregiver. In My Father's House Again shares an honest portrait of the situation facing so many baby boomers today. Valinda wondered if her dad should be in a nursing home, but he really wasn't ready. At ninety-four, he was able to dance and drive, but there was little else that interested him. But would he agree to come to live with her and her husband, Robert? After weighing all of the options, she and Robert came to the difficult conclusion that she must go to live with her father to care for him. It was a life change not only for her but also for her husband, who stayed behind until he was able to retire. It was only nine months, but it seemed like a lifetime. When she relocated 700 miles from everything that was familiar to her, she had no idea how difficult it would be to manage without Robert. Her dad had no intention of making anything easy for her, either. If she was to help him, it would be on his terms.
A compelling novel of a man brought to reckon with his buried past. In St. Adrienne, a small black community in Louisiana, Reverend Phillip Martin—a respected minister and civil rights leader—comes face to face with the sins of his youth in the person of Robert X, a young, unkempt stranger who arrives in town for a mysterious "meeting" with the Reverend. In the confrontation between the two, the young man's secret burden explodes into the open, and Phillip Martin begins a long-neglected journey into his youth to discover how destructive his former life was, for himself and for those around him.
"From a quick-tempered singing grandmother to a performance of The Mikado in an African village: David Kinloch's exploration of his relationship with his father is both unexpected and affectionate. An extended sequence of poems moves from personal memory to reflections on the values embodied in such cultural father-figures as David Livingstone and the Irish patriot Roger Casement. Translations of poems by Paul Celan and others into vivid Scots illuminate the disturbing connections between patriarchy and twentieth-century violence. In contrast, moving and humorous 'dissections' of adult relationships evoke images of the body both scientific and spiritual."--BOOK JACKET.
A rusted wok; a rooster's feather; a battered cricket bat; World War II medals; a Vietnam Moratorium badge; a ring. Why are these things so precious to Beth? The war in Afghanistan is entering its eighth year. Beth has been living in her father's house, looking after him, waiting for him to die. And now the wretched old man is finally dead and she must clear out the contents of the house ready for sale... but Beth is a hoarder. Parting with anything at all is agony for her. For Martha, a professional clutter buster and ruthless neat freak, throwing things out is easy - some say, too easy. As the two women begin to trawl through the mountains of 'stuff' that have built up over the years, gradually the layers of both their lives are peeled back. In My Father's House is about passion, obsession and imagination. It is about families - their secrets, lies and loves. It explores the ways in which war damages people's lives and what it really means to be brave. How do we come to terms with the past, let go and move on?
'Dear Thrumpton, how I miss you tonight,' wrote George Seymour in 1944, when he was aged twenty-one. But the object of his affection was not a young woman, but a house -- ownership of which was then a distant dream. But he did eventually acquire Thrumpton, a beautiful country house in Nottinghamshire, and it was in this idyllic home that Miranda Seymour grew up. But her upbringing was far from idyllic, as life revolved around her father's capriciousness. The House took priority, and everything -- everyone -- else was secondary. Until, that is, the day late on in his life when George Seymour took to riding powerful motorbikes around the countryside clad in black leather in the company of a young male friend. Had he taken leave of his senses? Or finally found them? And how did this sea-change affect his wife and daughter? Both biography and family memoir, IN MY FATHER'S HOUSE is a riveting and ultimately shocking portrait of desire both overt and suppressed, and the devastating consequences of misplaced love.
Burton traces the evolution of Edgefield County from the antebellum period through Reconstruction and beyond. From amassed information on every household in this large rural community, he tests the many generalizations about southern black and white families of this period and finds that they were strikingly similar. Wealth, rather than race or class, was the main factor that influenced family structure, and the matriarchal family was but a myth.
We all ahve experienced personal experiencesa or encounters with people that have been hurt - even in the Church. The focus of this book is to encourage readers that your situation is not as rare as imagined. You will be challenged to obtain your healing and to help others recover. This book is designed for personal reflection and group study as each chapter ends with questions and calls to action.
Max Meyer, a Jew from New York, Ellis Warne, a doctor's son, Birch Tucker, an Arkansas farmer, and Jefferson Canfield, the son of a Black sharecropper, return from World War I with changed expectations.
The Abernathy family lives in rural Mississippi where folks farm cotton and grow vegetables and kitchens are filled with smells of sweet potato pie, muscadine preserves, and pickled grapes. Cupboards bulge with Octagon soap wrappers collected to trade for dishes, and shelves are lined with homemade cures for everything ― sulphur, molasses, quinine, calomel, and mutton suet. Life is serene and harmonious if folks follow the rules and heed natures' signals. Everyone knows, for example, that a morning shower, like an old person's dance, never lasts long, or that high birds and high smoke mean good plowing weather. Some of the most important codes, however, are unspoken, and when these laws are violated, men are obliged to abide by the code even if it means doing the unthinkable. Hobson Abernathy, Big Hob, loves his family and leads his household with firmness and uncompromising example. His wife, Lavinia, was married at sixteen and still fulfills her duties with skill and selfless devotion. She obeys her husband (one of the rules), but she's a strong woman and when the occasion demands, she offers her wisdom to bring balance back to the family. Teenie, their teenage daughter spends her time bossin' her brother, Little Hob. Little Hob says he doesn't mind 'cause the same is true for chickens. One ol' rooster is always the boss and he can peck any chicken he wants to. When Teenie isn't bossin', she's dreaming about the young man she's sparkin', Woody. And, Woody? Well, he's anxious to marry Teenie and brags a lot to prove his eligibility. “Not bad loud-mouth bragging, just tongue-strutting,” as Hobson calls it. Little Hob is about growed up; still a boy in many ways, he is proud of his advancing maturity and is not shirking the arrival of a man's responsibilities. Hobson teaches his son everything he needs to know, and if there's a man Little Hob idolizes, it would be his papa, Big Hob.
Out of print since 1994, In My Father's House is offered again in a beautiful new edition. "Here is a unique and unmistakable voice for our moment." -Paul Mariani "In My Father's House is simply one of the most powerful books of poems I have read in a long, long time. Hodgen celebrates our humanity as he looks, unblinking, at the misery of the world with intensity, integrity, and compassion." -Jim Daniels "John Hodgen's book is a remarkable achievement, with poem after poem facing the relentlessness of the world and delivering life to us with clarity and an art so deft as to seem invisible." -Vern Rutsala John Hodgen won the Bluestem Award for In My Father's House and has won a major award for each successive book, including the Balcones Prize, AWP's Donald Hall Prize, the Chad Walsh Prize in Poetry, and several others. He teaches at Assumption College in Worcester, Massachusetts.

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