In Place/Out of Place was first published in 1996. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. What is the relationship between place and behavior? In this fascinating volume, Tim Cresswell examines this question via "transgressive acts" that are judged as inappropriate not only because they are committed by marginalized groups but also because of where they occur. In Place/Out of Place seeks to illustrate the ways in which the idea of geographical deviance is used as an ideological tool to maintain an established order. Cresswell looks at graffiti in New York City, the attempts by various "hippie" groups to hold a free festival at Stonehenge during the summer solstices of 1984–86, and the Greenham Common Women's Peace Camp in Berkshire, England. In each of the cases described, the groups involved were designated as out of place both by the media and by politicians, whose descriptions included an array of images such as dirt, disease, madness, and foreignness. Cresswell argues that space and place are key factors in the definition of deviance and, conversely, that space and place are used to construct notions of order and propriety. In addition, whereas ideological concepts being expressed about what is good, just, and appropriate often are delineated geographically, the transgression of these delineations reveals the normally hidden relationships between place and ideology-in other words, the "out-of-place" serves to highlight and define the "in-place." By looking at the transgressions of the marginalized, Cresswell argues, we can gain a novel perspective on the "normal" and "taken-for-granted" expectations of everyday life. The book concludes with a consideration of the possibility of a "politics of transgression," arguing for a link between the challenging of spatial boundaries and the possibility of social transformation. Tim Cresswell is currently lecturer in geography at the University of Wales.
Van der Graaf researches the emotional ties of residents to their deprived neighbourhood. In transforming deprived areas into great places to live much attention has been given to the physical, social and economical aspects of deprivation. However, little is known about the relationship between deprivation and emotional ties: What makes residents in deprived areas feel at home in their neighbourhood? In this PhD thesis Peter van der Graaf focused on the emotional ties of residents to their neighbourhood and researched how these ties are affected by urban renewal. He also compares practices between the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, where the emotions of residents are considered more in urban renewal.
This collection of articles offers a new and compelling perspective on the interface connecting syntax, phonology, semantics and pragmatics. At the core of this volume is the hypothesis that information structure represents the common interface of these grammatical components. Information structure is investigated here from different theoretical viewpoints yielding typologically relevant information and structural generalizations. In the volume's introductory chapter, the editors identify two central approaches to information structure: the formal and the interpretive view. The remainder of the book is organized accordingly. The first part examines information structure and grammar, concentrating on generalizations across languages. The second part investigates information structure and pragmatics, concentrating on clause structure and context. Through concrete analyses of topic, focus, and related phenomena across different languages, the contributors add new and convincing evidence to the research on information structure.
In late nineteenth-century Germany, the onset of modernity transformed how people experienced place. In response to increased industrialization and urbanization, the expansion of international capitalism, and the extension of railway and other travel networks, the sense of being connected to a specific place gave way to an unsettling sense of displacement. Out of Place analyzes the works of three major representatives of German Realism-Wilhelm Raabe, Theodor Fontane, and Gottfried Keller-within this historical context. It situates the perceived loss of place evident in their texts within the contemporary discourse of housing and urban reform, but also views such discourse through the lens of twentienth-century theories of place. Informed by both phenomenological (Heidegger and Casey) as well as Marxist (Deleuze, Guattari, and Benjamin) approaches to place, John B. Lyon highlights the struggle to address issues of place and space that reappear today in debates about environmentalism, transnationalism, globalization, and regionalism.
Dr. Stowel made a big mistake: experimenting with unverified theories of time travel. The consequence was his sudden departure from Earth and his introduction to a sentient alien race. When he returns, many years later, he doesn't know how he got back, or why. Injured and suffering from severe memory loss, Stowel can only speculate that the aliens were responsible, that they are on Earth now and that they are up to no good. To the agents of the Temporal Exploration and Advancement project, Stowel's return could mean advancing their research by years. Yet with the risk of instigating an alien conflict as a result of their research, the project is at risk of being terminated instead! What is really gong on? Katherine Maya is certain there is more, locked inside the lost memories of Dr. Trenton Stowel. But how can she unlock the memories of a man who keeps disappearing into thin air?
Have you ever been the outsider? The neglected? The shamed or the forgotten? This collection views society through those on the outside. Here are stories from 13 authors about life on the fringe. This is how it feels to be out of place. Contributors: Steven Ormosi Scott Thurlow J. Ian Manczur Kathy Ormosi Alan Tyson Steve Toase Rob Spalding Adrian Reynolds Jason Beamish Shawn Scott Smith Jeff Jamieson Janos Honkonen D. Max Loy
Donna M. Goldstein presents a hard-hitting critique of urban poverty and violence and challenges much of what we think we know about the "culture of poverty" in this compelling read. Drawing on more than a decade of experience in Brazil, Goldstein provides an intimate portrait of everyday life among the women of the favelas, or urban shantytowns in Rio de Janeiro, who cope with unbearable suffering, violence and social abandonment. The book offers a clear-eyed view of socially conditioned misery while focusing on the creative responses—absurdist and black humor—that people generate amid daily conditions of humiliation, anger, and despair. Goldstein helps us to understand that such joking and laughter is part of an emotional aesthetic that defines the sense of frustration and anomie endemic to the political and economic desperation among residents of the shantytown.
First Published in 1992. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Discusses the impact of inner city redevelopment programs and policies on the homeless and shows the methods used (civil protests, squatting, and legal advocacy) by the homeless to organize a tactical resistance to restructuring efforts. Presents case studies of two different types of homeless organized resistance groups in Chicago and San Jose.
A Place Out of Time by Jon David Douglas Hidden worlds, witches, cultural conflict! Ralph Sutherland, a novelist, and his wife Elizabeth, formerly a publisher's editor- both sophisticated New Yorkers, are settling into life in the village of Pleasant View, in New York state. Ralph has burnt out as a novelist, losing his money and property through extravagance and imprudence. Elizabeth has had a miscarriage because of her careless lifestyle. Their present relationship is cool although they express love for one another. Then Ralph discovers a tiny hamlet, Paradise, concealed- since the 1700s- deep in the Adirondack woods behind their home. When a developer threatens the tranquility of Pleasant View and the very existence of the hidden isolated village, he must solve personal dilemmas and enter the political arena to fight for the survival of both communities.
"In a series of sketches, regionalist writers such as Alice Cary, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, Sarah Orne Jewett, Grace King, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Sui Sin Far, and Mary Austin critique the approach to regional subjects characteristic of local color and present narrators who serve as cultural interpreters for persons often considered "out of place" by urban readers. In their approach to these writers, Fetterley and Pryse offer contemporary readers an alternative vantage point from which to consider questions of regions and regionalism in the global economy of our own time."--Jacket.
Fitting into Place adopts a multi-dimensional interdisciplinary approach to explore shifting geographies and temporalities that re-constitute 'city publics' - and the place of the 'public sociologist'. Class, race and gender (dis)advantages are situated in relation to urban-rural contrasts, where 'future selves' are reconfigured in and through 'local' and 'global' sites: people inhabit shifting times and places, from industrial landscapes of the 'past', to a current present and (imagined) 'cosmopolitan' 'regenerated' future. The rhetorics and vocabularies of place, as affective and material, suggest a more complex 'fit' than the language of masculine 'crisis' for past-times, or 'feminised' fit into new-futures, suggests. Across the generations, women's labour is still effaced as maps of loyalty hold up families as reference points of belonging and 'fitting in'; such architecture of place complicates reified 'geographies of choice' which centre a middle-class mobile subject. Based upon funded empirical research, this book will be of interest to sociologists and geographers.
Pernille Hohnen has written a detailed ethnography of a Lithuanian market place in the mid-1990s and as such contributes significantly to the understanding of a phenomenon largely unaccounted for by anthropologists, namely shuttle trading, and a new form of transnationalism connected to thenumerous outdoor markets that were established all over Eastern and Central Europe during the 1990s, most of which still flourish. Traders go as far as China, India, Turkey, and Poland and bring back items for local consumption as well as for retail, not only within the country, but throughout theregion. The global extension of the local market is astonishing, not least on account of the personal ingenuity invested in an uncertain business where one can only learn the hard way. Furthermore, by combining a synchronic analysis of the market with an analysis of changing trading practices duringthe crucial 10-year period of the 1990s, the book sheds important light on processes of creativity and venture, as well as on the more gradual institutionalization of trading practices such as trade routes, trading routines, technology, and forms of political control.Both traders and their environment tend to evaluate the market place as somehow outside civilized society. The 'disorderly' nature of the market epitomizes contested social hierarchies and cultural categories, as well as privatized power relations in the form of racketeers which slowly gainlegitimacy. The analysis of the market place sheds light on changing discourses of ethnicity, gender and work in Lithuanian society as well as contributing to a more thorough theoretical understanding of 'transition'.
"Place" shapes human identity and community. Arguing that theologies are shaped by place so no theology can be universal, "Out of Place" assesses the ways in which theology, as a discipline and a practice, is "out of place". Departing from dominant theological discourse, the book argues that for theology to be transformative it must connect with "place" and engage with marginalised peoples and cultures. Ranging across Asian American theology to Tamils in the London diaspora, Australian Pentecostalism to HIV and AIDS sufferers, "Out of Place" will be of invaluable to scholars and students of sociology and religion interested in the intersection of theology and locality.
Is it citizenship of a state or status as a human being that confers human rights on a person? If a person is stateless, how, and in what way, do human rights still apply to them? This book addresses these questions in the context of international human rights law and the notion of the 'right to have rights'.
Ecologists can spend a lifetime researching a small patch of the earth, studying the interactions between organisms and the environment, and exploring the roles those interactions play in determining distribution, abundance, and evolutionary change. With so few ecologists and so many systems to study, generalizations are essential. But how do you extrapolate knowledge about a well-studied area and apply it elsewhere? Through a range of original essays written by eminent ecologists and naturalists, The Ecology of Place explores how place-focused research yields exportable general knowledge as well as practical local knowledge, and how society can facilitate ecological understanding by investing in field sites, place-centered databases, interdisciplinary collaborations, and field-oriented education programs that emphasize natural history. This unique patchwork of case-study narratives, philosophical musings, and historical analyses is tied together with commentaries from editors Ian Billick and Mary Price that develop and synthesize common threads. The result is a unique volume rich with all-too-rare insights into how science is actually done, as told by scientists themselves.
Given that touch and touching is so central to everyday embodied existence, why has it been largely ignored by social scientists for so long? What is the place of touch in our mixed spaces of sociality, work, domesticity, recreation, creativity or care? What conceptual resources and academic languages can we reach towards when approaching tactile activities and somatic experiences through the body? How is this tactile landscape gendered? How is touch becoming revisited and revalidated in late capitalism through animal encounters, tourism, massage, beauty treatments, professional medicine, everyday spiritualities or the aseptic touch-free spaces of automated toilets? How is touch placed and valued within scholarly fieldwork and research itself, integral as it is to the production of embodied epistemologies? How is touch involved in such aesthetic experiences as shaping objects in sand, or encountering fleshly bodies within a painting? The goal of this edited collection, Touching Space, Placing Touch is twofold: • To further advance theoretical and empirical understanding of touch in social science scholarship by focussing on the differential social and cultural meanings of touching and the places of touch. • To develop a multi-faceted and interdisciplinary explanations of touch in terms of individual and social life, personal experiences and tasks, and their related cultural contexts. The twelve essays in this volume provide a rich combination of theoretical resources, methodological approaches and empirical investigation. Each chapter takes a distinct aspect of touch within a particular spatial context, exploring this through a mixture of sustained empirical work, critical theories of embodiment, philosophical and psychoanalytic approaches to gendered touch and touching, or the relationship between visual and non-visual culture, to articulate something of the variety and variability of touching experiences. The contributors are a mixture of established and emerging researchers within a growing interdisciplinary field of scholarship, yet the volume has a strong thematic identity and therefore represents the formative collection concerning the multiple senses of touch within social science scholarship at this time.
"A thorough and absorbing tour of the sub-discipline... An essential acquisition for any scholar or teacher interested in geographical perspectives on political process." - Sallie Marston, University of Arizona "This unique book is a true encyclopedia of political geography." - Vladimir Kolossov, Institute of Geography of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Vice President of the IGU The SAGE Handbook of Political Geography provides a highly contextualised and systematic overview of the latest thinking and research in the field. Edited by key scholars, with international contributions from acknowledged authorities on the relevant research, the Handbook is divided into six sections: Scope and Development of Political Geography: the geography of knowledge, conceptualisations of power and scale. Geographies of the State: state theory, territory and central local relations, legal geographies, borders. Participation and representation: citizenship, electoral geography, media public space and social movements. Political Geographies of Difference: class, nationalism, gender, sexuality and culture. Geography Policy and Governance: regulation, welfare, urban space, and planning. Global Political Geographies: imperialism, post-colonialism, globalization, environmental politics, IR, war and migration. The SAGE Handbook of Political Geography is essential reading for upper level students and scholars with an interest in politics and space.

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