A look at saddles in England from Roman times until the 18th century the English saddle developed rapidly into the world's leading design and remains pre-eminent today.
This charming account of life in Appalachia at the turn of the century is one of the three most important books from the early twentieth century that, as Dwight Billings writes in his foreword, have "had a profound and lasting impact on how we think about Appalachia and, indeed, on the fact that we commonly believe that such a place and people can be readily identified." Originally published in 1924, it was advertised as a "racy book, full of the thrill of mountain adventure and the delicious humor of vigorously human people." James Watt Raine, professor of English literature and later head of the English and drama departments at Berea College from 1906 until his retirement in 1939, provides eyewitness accounts of mountain speech and folksinging, education, religion, community, politics, and farming. In a conscious effort to dispel the negative stereotype of the drunken, slothful, gun-toting hillbilly prone to violence, Raine presents positive examples from his own experiences among the region's native inhabitants.
Illuminating, engrossing and full of surprises, The Discovery of France is a literary exploration of a country few will recognize; from maps and migration to magic, language and landscape, it’s a book that reveals the ‘real’ past of France to tell the whole story – and history – of this remarkable nation. ‘With gloriously apposite facts and an abundance of quirky anecdotes and thumbnail sketches of people, places and customs, Robb, on brilliant form, takes us on a stunning journey through the historical landscape of France’ Independent ‘Certain books strain the patience of those close to you. How many times can you demand: “Look at this! Can you imagine? Did you know that?” without actually handing over the volume? This is such a book’ Mail on Sunday ‘An extraordinary journey of discovery that will delight even the most indolent armchair traveller’ Daily Telegraph
This is a must read book for anyone interested in the areas of racial theory and racial relations, multicultural and polarized religions, and the making of African personality and culture. In keeping with earlier volumes in the series, it emphasizes the cross-fertilization of Africa and the world. In "Binga Bank: Th e Development of the Black Metropolis" Beth Johnson gives an historic look at the opening of the Binga Bank, its founder, and how the bank helped stimulate the black metropolis in Chicago. "Black on the Block" takes a look at life in the community of North Kenwood-Oakland, California. Mark Christian describes what it is like to be a member in the African diaspora in the United States and United Kingdom. In the racial theory and racial relations area, Clarence Tally's "The æRace' Concept and Racial Structure" argues that the study of race has become dominated by the idea that race is socially constructed. Reiland Rabaka analyzes discourse on the process of awarding reparations to people of African origin. Paula A. Moore explains why people of African descent with mental health problems do not receive treatment. "Patriot Day" focuses on the emergence and growth of Islam in America and its struggle to connect with America's cultural heritage. "Edward Wilmot Blyden and the African Personality," by James Conyers, reviews Blyden's ideas and beliefs challenging the European worldview. "Cultural Helix Th eory" examines the most fundamental component of African culture, language and how it aff ects the black community. "Black in the Saddle" by Demetrius W. Pearson chronicles the professional and personal experiences of Willie Thomas, an African American cowboy.
First published in 1865, this two-volume history describes the European exploration and settlement of Australia and New Zealand.
Athens, city of the gods, birthplace of modern democracy, artistic and cultural center of the ancient world, is steeped in myth and legend. Now, in this newly reissued book publishing just in time for the 2004 Olympics being held in Athans, travel writer John Freely guides readers on a series of walks to the city's most vibrant and historic areas, from the magnificent Parthenon, center of Athens for four thousand years, to the winding streets of Plaka, the crumbling ruins of the Agora and the color and bustle of Monastiraki. We are led to the theatre of Dionysus, scene of the tragic plays of Aeschylus and Sophocles and to the spot where Phidippides ended his legendary run from Marathon. Vivid descriptions of Athens' most famous monuments and archeological sites are interwoven with mythology and anecdote; secret gems are discovered and the past resurrected with every step. This guide, more than any other available, reveals how the heart of ancient Athens still beats beneath the living, modern city.
This 1906 volume traces the history of Spitsbergen in the Svalbald archipelago over the course of more than three centuries.
This comprehensive guide to touring important sites of Dutch history also serves as an engrossing cultural and historical reference. Art and architecture, cooking, furniture and antiques, much more. Color photographs and maps.
Containing more than 600 entries, this valuable resource presents all aspects of travel writing. There are entries on places and routes (Afghanistan, Black Sea, Egypt, Gobi Desert, Hawaii, Himalayas, Italy, Northwest Passage, Samarkand, Silk Route, Timbuktu), writers (Isabella Bird, Ibn Battuta, Bruce Chatwin, Gustave Flaubert, Mary Kingsley, Walter Ralegh, Wilfrid Thesiger), methods of transport and types of journey (balloon, camel, grand tour, hunting and big game expeditions, pilgrimage, space travel and exploration), genres (buccaneer narratives, guidebooks, New World chronicles, postcards), companies and societies (East India Company, Royal Geographical Society, Society of Dilettanti), and issues and themes (censorship, exile, orientalism, and tourism). For a full list of entries and contributors, a generous selection of sample entries, and more, visit the Literature of Travel and Exploration: An Encyclopedia website.
Across history, the ideas and practices of male identity have varied much between time and place: masculinity proves to be a slippery concept, not available to all men, sometimes even applied to women. This book analyses the dynamics of 'masculinity' as both an ideology and lived experience - how men have tried, and failed, to be 'Real Men'.
This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.
In Scholars in Action, an international group of 40 authors open up new perspectives on the eighteenth-century culture of knowledge, with a particular focus on scholars and their various practices.
First published in English in 1867, this work represents the first systematic geological survey of New Zealand, an island group with great geological diversity as a result of active volcanoes and frequent earthquakes. Vividly recording the author's travels and many observations, it remains a valuable resource in Australasian natural science.
Sullivan recalls his time spent as sergeant of the legendary Texas Rangers during the years from 1889 to 1901, and his most intriguing memories that include hanging murderers, wrestling buffalo, and rounding up cattle poachers.
Presents activities to engage students, covering early humans, first civilizations, and ancient cultures throughout the world.
The papers collected in this volume address the historical archaeology of Aboriginal Australia & its application in researching the shared history of Aboriginal & settler Australians.

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