Written from the French front by a brave Red Cross nurse, these home letters were hurriedly penned amid the incessant roar of the mighty guns and surrounded by the wounded and the dying. This collection provides a fascinating glimpse into the life of a nurse at war.
My Father Frank S. Iriam signed up the same day as Germany declared war in 1914. In Valcartier they announced that a sniper group was about to be formed. Frank signed up immediately and this book describes some of his experiences as a sniper. Do to some prior military service in Halifax he had been promoted to Sargent in Kenora and he maintained that rank through out the war. Frank describes the fact that he was able to mentally beat the shell shock he was starting to suffer all on his own. He spent three years seven months in the front lines being wounded by machine gun fire during the battle of Ameins where the allies chased the Germans out of their trenches never letting them dig another. After a lengthy recovery period he got back to Kenora, his job as a Railroad Engineer and canoeing his favorite pass time.
Provides an overview of trench warfare during World War I.
The unprecedented magnitude of death during World War I forever altered how people perceived their world and how they represented those perceptions. In Postcards from the Trenches, Allyson Booth traces the complex relationship between British Great War culture and modernist writings. She shows that, through the experience of the Great War, both civilian and combatant modernist writers found that language could no longer represent experience. She goes on to identify and contextualize several of the resulting modernist tropes: she links the dissolving modernist self to soldiers' familiarity with corpses, the modernist mistrust of factuality to the apparent inaccessibility of facts regarding the "rape of Belgium," and the modernist interest in multiple viewpoints to the singularity of perspective with which generals studied battlefield maps. Though her emphasis is on literary works by Robert Graves, E.M. Forster, and Vera Brittain, among others, Booth's analysis extends to memorials, posters, and architecture of the Great War. This interdisciplinary quality of Booth's study results in a much deeper understanding of how the Great War affected cultural representations and how that culture represented the War.
Part of the million-selling MY STORY series that brings the past into the real world, giving it a truly human touch. TRENCHES is set in 1917 and is the story of Billy Stevens, a telegraph operator, stationed near Ypres. The Great War has been raging for three years when Billy finds himself taking part in the deadly Big Push. But he is shocked to discover that the bullets of his fellow soldiers aren't just aimed at the enemy. Vividly imagined and historically accurate, readers are taken on a first-hand journey of danger and peril.
A history of the First World War told through the letters exchanged by ordinary British soldiers and their families.??Letters from the Trenches reveals how people really thought and felt during the conflict and covers all social classes and groups Ð from officers to conscripts and women at home to conscientious objectors.??Voices within the book include Sergeant John Adams, 9th Royal Irish Fusiliers, who wrote in May 1917:'For the day we get our letter from home is a red Letter day in the history of the soldier out here. It is the only way we can hear what is going on. The slender thread between us and the homeland.'??Private Stanley Goodhead, who served with one of the Manchester Pals battalion, wrote home in 1916: 'I came out of the trenches last night after being in 4 days. You have no idea what 4 days in the trenches means...The whole time I was in I had only about 2 hours sleep and that was in snatches on the firing step. What dugouts there are, are flooded with mud and water up to the knees and the rats hold swimming galas in them...We are literally caked with brown mud and it is in all?our food, tea etc.'??Jacqueline Wadsworth skilfully uses these letters to tell the human story of the First World War Ð what mattered to Britain's servicemen and their feelings about the war; how the conflict changed people; and how life continued on the Home Front.
Written by Captain A. Radclyffe Dugmore of the King's Own Light Infantry, this personal memoir provides an excellent account of the Great War up to the Battle of the Somme. A wide ranging and perceptive relation of events, Radclyffe Dugmore's pedigree as a professional writer shines through. In 1914, Radclyffe Dugmore travelled to Belgium as a civilian observer where he was wounded before spending a brief time in German captivity. These experiences gained Radclyffe Dugmore a highly unusual viewpoint for the opening battles of the war, that of a civilian, and later as a participant on the?front lines of the Somme.??Originally published under the title When The Somme Ran Red in 1918, Radclyffe Dugmore's memoir has sadly been long out of print. Yet what the author modestly described as 'Being a very egotistical account of my own personal experiences and observations from the early days of the war in Belgium to the Great Battle of the Somme in July, 1916' proves to be anything but that, consisting of a fascinating and rare account, sympathetically dedicated to the memory of the officers and men of the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry who fell in the Battle of the Somme.??This new re-print of Radclyffe Dugmore's classic volume is a worthy addition to the primary source literature of the Great War, and casts new light on the experiences of the brave men who saw the terror of the Battle of the Somme first hand.
Why, despite the appalling conditions in the trenches of the Western Front, was the British army almost untouched by major mutiny during the First World War? Drawing upon an extensive range of sources, including much previously unpublished archival material, G. D. Sheffield seeks to answer this question by examining a crucial but previously neglected factor in the maintenance of the British army's morale in the First World War: the relationship between the regimental officer and the ordinary soldier.
If you're looking for guidance on building and managing a Technology Professional Services Organization, you'll find 165 great tips in this book from folks who've been there and know first hand the trials and tribulations of running a services organization. Inside this book you'll find real-life experiences and "lessons learned" that will help you create and run a first-class services organization. Whether you're with a startup with just a few Consultants or with a Fortune 500 company with a sizable services organization, the gems provided in this book will give you insight into a range of topics, from setting up your Services strategy and charter; to Services marketing and selling; to business operations, organizational design, services delivery and offshoring. Written by over 100 Professional Services industry experts, you won't find a more comprehensive book on this subject anywhere. If you'd like to contribute to our next book or just connect with your peers, join our PS community at www.psvillage.com.
Purchase one of 1st World Library's Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. Visit us online at www.1stWorldLibrary.ORG - - I have tried as an American in writing this book to give the public a complete view of the trenches and life on the Western Front as it appeared to me, and also my impression of conditions and men as I found them. It has been a pleasure to write it, and now that I have finished I am genuinely sorry that I cannot go further. On the lecture tour I find that people ask me questions, and I have tried in this book to give in detail many things about the quieter side of war that to an audience would seem too tame. I feel that the public want to know how the soldiers live when not in the trenches, for all the time out there is not spent in killing and carnage. As in the case of all men in the trenches, I heard things and stories that especially impressed me, so I have written them as hearsay, not taking to myself credit as their originator. I trust that the reader will find as much joy in the cockney character as I did and which I have tried to show the public; let me say now that no finer body of men than those Bermondsey boys of my battalion could be found.
The horrific events of 9/11 and its sequelae have reinforced what thoughtful analysts have long known: that they have a responsibilty to respond to the complex social and emotional issues arising in their communities - to function, that is, as "community psychoanalysts." Analysts in the Trenches vividly illustrates what socially engaged analysts can offer to violent and disturbed communities. Contributors bring analytic expertise to bear on the emotional sequelae to violence, including sexual and physical abuse; to multiple and traumatic losses; and to learning inhibitions. Thay also explore and devise community responses to the scapegoating of classes and groups, to homelessness, and to variations in family structures. This volume provides heartening testimony to the relevance of psychodynamic thinking in the post-9/11 world and will spur professional readers to develop their own programs of community involvement.
Grade level: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, k, p, e, i, t.
Undermining the positions of the enemy is one of the most ancient activities. For almost 3000 years even before 1914, it was a popular siege-breaking technique. During the Great War, arguably the greatest siege the world had ever seen, it presented a conflict environment that perfectly favoured the skills of the military miner. During 1915, the Western Front was established as a static line that grew into a huge network of defence-in-depth earthworks. Siege conditions demanded siege tactics and as the ground was everywhere mineable, the Western Front was a prime candidate for underground warfare.??Royal Engineer tunnelling companies were specialist units of the Corps of Royal Engineers within the British Army, formed to dig attacking tunnels under enemy lines during the First World War. The Cornish Miners were one of these specialist units recruited from the tin mines of Cornwall.??In February 1915, eight Tunnelling Companies were created and operational in Flanders from March 1915. By mid-1916, the British Army had around 25,000 trained tunnellers, mostly volunteers taken from mining communities. This is their story.
The World War I poet Siegfried Sassoon is one of the twentieth century's greatest icons and Jean Moorcroft Wilson is the leading authority on him. In Siegfried Sassoon: The Journey from the Trenches, the second volume of her best-selling, authorized biography, Wilson completes her definitive analysis of his life and works, exploring Sassoon's experiences after the Great War. For many people, Sassoon exists primarily as a First World War poet and bold fighter, who earned the nickname 'Mad Jack' in the trenches and risked Court Martial, possibly the firing squad, with his public protest against the War. Much less is known about his life after the Armistice. Wilson uncovers a series of love affairs with such larger-than-life characters as Queen Victoria's great-grandson, Prince Phillip of Hess, the flamboyant Ivor Novello and the exotic and bejeweled Hon. Stephen Tennant. This period also sees Sassoon establishing close friendships with some of the greatest literary figures of the age, Hardy, Beerbohm, E. M. Forster and T. E.Lawrence among them. Sassoon himself said that most people thought he had died in 1919. But Wilson shows that his poetry is, if anything, more powerful in the second half of his life. Based on a decade of meticulous research and interviews with many who knew Sassoon well, much of the material is published here for the first time. Siegfried Sassoon: The Journey from the Trenches completes a fascinating story that is beautifully told.
This book is a shaking read, its controversial political statement putting forward the demand that readers accept the existence of conscious splitting of personality through treachery, deception, betrayal, torture, and violence. Beginning with the introductory poem, the book is an outcry about the significance of personal freedom as well as a blazing plea for commitment to making these abuses known and helping victims achieve safety and healing. The two authors present victims' horrendous experiences in a rational, factual, and professional way, building a foundational knowledge regarding what mind control is, how it uses deceit and lies, and how through betrayal and attachment trauma the basis is laid for lifelong exploitation. The authors present the terrifying and horrible situations that children are exposed to as they are coerced into actions that go against their own beliefs and true natures. The cooperation of the two authors, client and therapist, based on mutual respect, serves as a model for every change process: solidarity, freedom, and equality
This is Esera Tuaolo's own searing story of terror and hope. A Samoan raised on a Hawaiian banana plantation, he had a natural talent, football. He went on to play for five NFL teams: the Green Bay Packers, the Minnesota Vikings, the Jacksonville Jaguars, the Carolina Panthers, and the Atlanta Falcons in the 1999 Super Bowl. But for the nine years he played professional football he lived in terror that when his face flashed upon the TV screen, someone would divulge his darkest secret. Esera Tuaolo is gay. Alone in the Trenches takes you inside the homophobic world of professional football and describes fears that almost drove him to suicide. He evokes heartbreak--how his older brother, Tua, died of AIDS--and hope when, Esera, a deeply devout Christian fell in love and started a family. "Tuaolo emerges in these pages as a complex, intellectually curious and fascinating individual defined neither by his choice of career nor by his sexual orientation." --Booklist "Tough, tender and brutally honest." --Robert Lipsyte, former New York Times sports columnist "Even I was not prepared for his amazing life story." --Billy Bean, author of Going the Other Way
Tales from the Trenches: Politics and Practice in Feminist Service Organizations examines the political visions and experiences of women who created five feminist service organizations in the 1970s. The organizations include a shelter for battered women, a rape crisis center, a rape-prevention ride service, a residential facility for female offenders, and a statewide organization for chemically dependent women. Based primarily on interviews with 57 founders, staff, volunteers, and /or board members, the book traces into the mid-1980s how women translated their understandings of radical feminist ideology into goals, social change strategies, services, and organizational structures. Tales from the Trenches explores how members dealt with the problems created by antifeminist resistance as well as the dilemmas that characterized many feminist efforts in the early years of the women's movement. The extensive use of direct quotations in the book along with women's detailed accounts provide valuable examples of feminist practice based on thoughtful applications of feminist principles to specific circumstances rather than remaining within the confines of conventional assumptions or prescriptive politics.

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