Provides an overview of trench warfare during World War I.
Written from the French front by a brave Red Cross nurse, these home letters were hurriedly penned amid the incessant roar of the mighty guns and surrounded by the wounded and the dying. This collection provides a fascinating glimpse into the life of a nurse at war.
My Father Frank S. Iriam signed up the same day as Germany declared war in 1914. In Valcartier they announced that a sniper group was about to be formed. Frank signed up immediately and this book describes some of his experiences as a sniper. Do to some prior military service in Halifax he had been promoted to Sargent in Kenora and he maintained that rank through out the war. Frank describes the fact that he was able to mentally beat the shell shock he was starting to suffer all on his own. He spent three years seven months in the front lines being wounded by machine gun fire during the battle of Ameins where the allies chased the Germans out of their trenches never letting them dig another. After a lengthy recovery period he got back to Kenora, his job as a Railroad Engineer and canoeing his favorite pass time.
A history of the First World War told through the letters exchanged by ordinary British soldiers and their families.??Letters from the Trenches reveals how people really thought and felt during the conflict and covers all social classes and groups Ð from officers to conscripts and women at home to conscientious objectors.??Voices within the book include Sergeant John Adams, 9th Royal Irish Fusiliers, who wrote in May 1917:'For the day we get our letter from home is a red Letter day in the history of the soldier out here. It is the only way we can hear what is going on. The slender thread between us and the homeland.'??Private Stanley Goodhead, who served with one of the Manchester Pals battalion, wrote home in 1916: 'I came out of the trenches last night after being in 4 days. You have no idea what 4 days in the trenches means...The whole time I was in I had only about 2 hours sleep and that was in snatches on the firing step. What dugouts there are, are flooded with mud and water up to the knees and the rats hold swimming galas in them...We are literally caked with brown mud and it is in all?our food, tea etc.'??Jacqueline Wadsworth skilfully uses these letters to tell the human story of the First World War Ð what mattered to Britain's servicemen and their feelings about the war; how the conflict changed people; and how life continued on the Home Front.
Instructional Design in the Real World: A View from the Trenches offers guidance on how the traditional instructional design system has been used and how it must be changed to work within other systems. The environments and systems that affect the ADDIE (Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, Evaluation) process and to which it must be adapted include corporations, industry, consulting organizations, health care facilities, church and charitable groups, the military, the government, educational institutions, and others. Its application must be filtered and altered by the environments and the systems where the learning or training takes place. Every chapter includes a case study showing how the application of ID strategies, learning theories, systems theory, management theories and practices and communication tools and practices are adapted and applied in various environments. The chapters also contain lessons learned, tool tips, and suggestions for the future.
This books shows the readers how archaeology can be used to reveal the position of trenches, dugouts, and other battlefield features as well as to rediscovering what life on the Western Front was really like.
"In Politics in the Trenches, Volgy shows what really happens behind the scenes of government. He contrasts perception with reality regarding the rewards and perks of office. He examines the process of experimentation in the political laboratory and shows how the news media distort it. He provides a case study of homelessness to illustrate the system's constraints. And he offers a chapter on a typical week in office that will be an eye-opener for most readers."--BOOK JACKET.
Harris, executive director of the American Jewish Committee since 1990, shares 20 years of experience with the AJC, including working to help Soviet Jewry and his views on the Middle East, other parts of the world, the Holocaust, human rights, international terrorism, making a better America, and the future of American Jewry. His words on anti-Semitism, unsolved bombings in Argentina, and interfaith relations still resonate. Annotation copyrighted by Book News Inc., Portland, OR
At the end of the Great War, the U.S. Army faced the challenge of integrating what it had learned in the failures and ultimate success of its war effort. During the interwar years the army sought to balance readiness and modernization in a period of limited resources and technological advances with profound implications for the conduct of warfare. In After the Trenches, William O. Odom traces the development of combat doctrine between the world wars through an examination of the army's primary doctrine manuals, the Field Service Regulations. The Field Service Regulations of 1923 successfully assimilated the experiences of the First World War and translated them into viable tactical practice, Odom argues in this unique study. Rapidly developing technologies generated more efficient tools of war and greatly expanded the scale, tempo, and complexity of warfare. Personnel and material shortages led to a decline in the quality of army doctrine evidenced in the 1939 regulations. Examining the development of doctrine and the roles of key personalities such as John Pershing, Hugh Drum, George Lynch, Frank Parker, and Lesley McNair, Odom concludes that the successive revisions of the manual left the army scurrying to modernize its woefully outdated doctrine on the eve of the new war. This impressively researched study of the doctrine of the interwar army fills a significant gap in our understanding of the development of the U.S. Army during the first half of the twentieth century. It will serve scholars and others interested in military history as the standard reference on the subject. Moreover, many of the challenges and conditions that existed seventy years ago resemble those faced bytoday's army. This study of the army's historical responses to a declining military budget and an ever-changing technology will broaden the perspectives of those who must deal with these important contemporary issues.
The unprecedented magnitude of death during World War I forever altered how people perceived their world and how they represented those perceptions. In Postcards from the Trenches, Allyson Booth traces the complex relationship between British Great War culture and modernist writings. She shows that, through the experience of the Great War, both civilian and combatant modernist writers found that language could no longer represent experience. She goes on to identify and contextualize several of the resulting modernist tropes: she links the dissolving modernist self to soldiers' familiarity with corpses, the modernist mistrust of factuality to the apparent inaccessibility of facts regarding the "rape of Belgium," and the modernist interest in multiple viewpoints to the singularity of perspective with which generals studied battlefield maps. Though her emphasis is on literary works by Robert Graves, E.M. Forster, and Vera Brittain, among others, Booth's analysis extends to memorials, posters, and architecture of the Great War. This interdisciplinary quality of Booth's study results in a much deeper understanding of how the Great War affected cultural representations and how that culture represented the War.
This is Esera Tuaolo's own searing story of terror and hope. A Samoan raised on a Hawaiian banana plantation, he had a natural talent, football. He went on to play for five NFL teams: the Green Bay Packers, the Minnesota Vikings, the Jacksonville Jaguars, the Carolina Panthers, and the Atlanta Falcons in the 1999 Super Bowl. But for the nine years he played professional football he lived in terror that when his face flashed upon the TV screen, someone would divulge his darkest secret. Esera Tuaolo is gay. Alone in the Trenches takes you inside the homophobic world of professional football and describes fears that almost drove him to suicide. He evokes heartbreak--how his older brother, Tua, died of AIDS--and hope when, Esera, a deeply devout Christian fell in love and started a family. "Tuaolo emerges in these pages as a complex, intellectually curious and fascinating individual defined neither by his choice of career nor by his sexual orientation." --Booklist "Tough, tender and brutally honest." --Robert Lipsyte, former New York Times sports columnist "Even I was not prepared for his amazing life story." --Billy Bean, author of Going the Other Way
Purchase one of 1st World Library's Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. Visit us online at www.1stWorldLibrary.ORG - - I have tried as an American in writing this book to give the public a complete view of the trenches and life on the Western Front as it appeared to me, and also my impression of conditions and men as I found them. It has been a pleasure to write it, and now that I have finished I am genuinely sorry that I cannot go further. On the lecture tour I find that people ask me questions, and I have tried in this book to give in detail many things about the quieter side of war that to an audience would seem too tame. I feel that the public want to know how the soldiers live when not in the trenches, for all the time out there is not spent in killing and carnage. As in the case of all men in the trenches, I heard things and stories that especially impressed me, so I have written them as hearsay, not taking to myself credit as their originator. I trust that the reader will find as much joy in the cockney character as I did and which I have tried to show the public; let me say now that no finer body of men than those Bermondsey boys of my battalion could be found.
If you're looking for guidance on building and managing a Technology Professional Services Organization, you'll find 165 great tips in this book from folks who've been there and know first hand the trials and tribulations of running a services organization. Inside this book you'll find real-life experiences and "lessons learned" that will help you create and run a first-class services organization. Whether you're with a startup with just a few Consultants or with a Fortune 500 company with a sizable services organization, the gems provided in this book will give you insight into a range of topics, from setting up your Services strategy and charter; to Services marketing and selling; to business operations, organizational design, services delivery and offshoring. Written by over 100 Professional Services industry experts, you won't find a more comprehensive book on this subject anywhere. If you'd like to contribute to our next book or just connect with your peers, join our PS community at www.psvillage.com.
In Dirty God: Jesus in the Trenches, Johnnie Moore draws on both Scripture and his extensive experience with other cultures and religions to show how the God of the Bible is unique in his willingness to be near us in all of our messiness. Moore outlines the central importance of the doctrine of grace while introducing readers to a humble and human Jesus who reaches out to us at our worst and pulls us up to our best. Grace, Moore argues, is something that is both gotten and given, and the two-part structure of the book allows readers to explore both of these dynamics. By offering hope rather than condemnation and showing the practical applications of grace in today’s world, Dirty God will appeal to both the committed Christian and the spiritual seeker looking for a more authentic faith. Challenging and engaging, Dirty God is sure to establish Johnnie Moore as an emerging voice for Millennial and Gen-X evangelicals for years to come.
Stanley Arthur Rutledge was a man of many parts: lawyer, beloved son, soldier, man of letters before his life was cut tragically short on the 16th November 1917. A member of the famed Canadian Corps, he left his home shore in 1915 and served courageously until dying in a flying accident whilst trained for the Royal Flying Corps. This volume is divided into two parts: the first contains notes, anecdotes and experiences that the Author wrote whilst in the trenches through the battles of the Western Front, including the Somme. In them he describes the daily shelling, sniper fire, deadly poison gas, going over the top and even a sentry shooting one of his own officers who didn’t hear his challenge. The second part is made up of his letters home to his parents in Canada describing his experiences in the “Hippodrome of Hell” of the war. In spite of his audience, he pulled no punches in his retellings... An excellent First World War Memoir. Author — Stanley Arthur Rutledge d. 1917 Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in Toronto, William Briggs, 1918. Original Page Count – 159 pages.
German art student Otto Schubert was 22 years old when he was drafted into the Great War. As the conflict unfolded, he painted a series of postcards that he sent to his sweetheart, Irma. During the battles of Ypres and Verdun, Schubert filled dozens of military-issued 4†? x 6†? cards with vivid images depicting the daily realities and tragedies of war. Beautifully illustrated with full-color reproductions of his exquisite postcards, as well as his wartime sketches, woodcuts, and two lithograph portfolios, Postcards from the Trenches is Schubert's war diary, love journal, and life story. His powerful artworks illuminate and document in a visual language the truths of war. Postcards from the Trenches offers the first full account of Otto Schubert, soldier-artist of the Great War, rising art star in the 1920s, prolific graphic artist and book illustrator, one of the "degenerate†? artists defamed by the Nazis, and a man shattered by the Second World War and the Cold War. Created in the midst of enormous devastation, Schubert's haunting visual missives are as powerful and relevant today as they were a century ago. His postcards are both a young man's token of love and longing and a soldier's testimony of the Great War. **Please note that this will work best on a colour device**
Grade level: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, k, p, e, i, t.
Tales from the Trenches: Politics and Practice in Feminist Service Organizations examines the political visions and experiences of women who created five feminist service organizations in the 1970s. The organizations include a shelter for battered women, a rape crisis center, a rape-prevention ride service, a residential facility for female offenders, and a statewide organization for chemically dependent women. Based primarily on interviews with 57 founders, staff, volunteers, and /or board members, the book traces into the mid-1980s how women translated their understandings of radical feminist ideology into goals, social change strategies, services, and organizational structures. Tales from the Trenches explores how members dealt with the problems created by antifeminist resistance as well as the dilemmas that characterized many feminist efforts in the early years of the women's movement. The extensive use of direct quotations in the book along with women's detailed accounts provide valuable examples of feminist practice based on thoughtful applications of feminist principles to specific circumstances rather than remaining within the confines of conventional assumptions or prescriptive politics.
The IT management profession is not for the faint of heart. Anyone who has worked in this sector is familiar with the unique (and borderline impossible) challenge of trying to keep up with technology innovation while operating on a too-small budget and facing constant criticism for problems outside of their control. "Truth From the Trenches" passes on the hard-won leadership lessons that seven-time CIO Mark Settle gained over years of working in IT management. Settle describes the key constituencies that an IT leader needs to influence, seduce, leverage, and manage to be successful. His practical recommendations will allow readers to improve their organizational impact and accelerate their career advancement. In a sector where competency stems not from formal certification but on-the-job learning, "Truth from the Trenches" is valuable and unique resource based on Settle’s deep experience working in a variety of industries. By applying Settle’s strategies, IT workers will be able to avoid common pitfalls, save themselves from wasting time and effort on hopeless initiatives, and navigate everyday IT challenges.

Best Books