In 1922, the British archaeologist Henry Carter opened King Tutankhamun’s tomb, illuminating the glories of an ancient civilization. And while the world celebrated the extraordinary revelation that gave Carter international renown and an indelible place in history, by the time of his death, the discovery had nearly destroyed him. Now, in a stunning feat of narrative nonfiction, Daniel Meyerson has written a thrilling and evocative account of this remarkable man and his times. Carter began his career inauspiciously. At the age of seventeen–unknown, untrained, untried–he was hired as a copyist of tomb art by the brash, brilliant, and boldly unkempt father of modern archaeology, W. F. Petrie. Carter struck out on his own a few years later, sensing that something amazing lay buried beneath his feet, waiting for him to uncover it. But others had the same idea: The ancient cities of Egypt were crawling with European adventurers and their wealthy sponsors, each hoping to outdo the others with glittering discoveries–even as growing nationalist resentment against foreigners plundering the country’s most treasured antiquities simmered dangerously in the background. Not until Carter met up with the risk-taking, adventure-loving occultist Lord Carnarvon did his fortunes change. There were stark differences in personality and temperament between the cantankerous Carter and his gregarious patron, but together they faced down endless ridicule from the most respected explorers of the day. Seven dusty and dispiriting years after their first meeting, their dream came to astonishing life. But there would be a price to pay for this partnership, their discovery, and the glory and fame it brought both men–and the chain of events that transpired in the wake of their success remains fascinating and shocking to this day. An enthralling story told with unprecedented verve, In the Valley of the Kings is a tale of mania and greed, of fame and lost fortune, of history and its damnations. As he did in The Linguist and the Emperor, Daniel Meyerson puts his exciting storytelling powers on full display, revealing an almost forgotten time when past and present came crashing together with the power to change–or curse–men’s lives. From the Hardcover edition.
Studies one of the mummies at the British Museum--Hornedjitef, high priest of Amun at Thebes during the Ptolemaic period--and provides information about Egyptian culture in his day and earlier.
Describes the discovery of the tomb of the Egyptian king Tutankhamun and what it revealed about everyday life in his time.
An enthralling fictional account of Howard Carter’s famous search for the tomb of King Tut and the mystery behind the tragic death and disappearance of ancient Egypt’s child ruler In ancient times, a boy king occupied the throne in a troubled desert land. His name was Tutankhamun. Both his reign and his life were shockingly brief, and his burial place was unknown—mysteries that would intrigue the inquisitive for centuries to come. An English archaeologist irresistibly drawn to Egypt and her secrets, Howard Carter arrives in the Middle East in the second decade of the twentieth century to uncover the hidden final resting place of the tragic child pharaoh. But from the outset his search is plagued by misfortune and obstruction—a corrupt and unbending Egyptian bureaucracy, a British lord and patron more interested in profit than in knowledge, and Carter’s own inability to connect with his fellow human beings. Still, he will not be deterred from his obsessive hunt for the answer to one of the most astonishing puzzles in the history of the world. In her magnificent novel Valley of the Kings, Cecelia Holland has created two worlds, brilliantly re-creating Egypt in the 1920s and in the time of Tutankhamun. A stunning tale of determination and discovery, brimming with color, mystery, and life, it confirms her standing as one of the true masters of historical fiction.
Explores the scientific, historical, and cultural facts behind the Indiana Jones movies, discussing real-life archeologists and their adventures, the uses of bullwhips, and the connection between Nazis and the occult.
"Let me try and tell the story of it all. It will not be easy, for the dramatic suddenness of the initial discovery left me in a dazed condition, and the months that have followed have been so crowded with incident that I have hardly had time to think." Among the hundreds of books written about ancient Egypt and Tutankhamen, you won't find an equal to Howard Carter's powerful book about his discovery. His great work in many ways remained unfinished. He left us, however, this remarkable document of discovery. The book is Carter's personal story of the greatest adventure of his life--one that has not been surpassed in nearly a century of archaeology. In 1904, retired American lawyer, Theodore Davis, famously declared that The Valley of the Kings in Thebes had given up all of its secrets, leaving nothing more to be discovered. He relinquished his exclusive rights to dig in The Valley. But as Howard Carter states in this volume, "The history of The Valley has never lacked the dramatic element." Some 18 years later, Carter made the richest archaeological discovery in history within yards of where Davis had dug. The world immediately became obsessed with everything Tutankhamen. From architecture, to household goods, to fashion, a early 20th-century surge in fascination with ancient Egypt took hold across the globe. Howard Carter, too, had been obsessed with finding Tut. The discovery would consume the rest of Carter's life. After becoming known to the world, Howard Carter died in relative obscurity in 1939. This is not a dry scientific treatment of the excavation or the artifacts. What he imparts with this book is a sense of excitement, wonder, and mystery set expertly into a concise context of history and Egyptology, captivating layperson and specialist alike, young or old. Intertwining notes on Egyptian gods, religion, mythology, and magic, Carter spins an alluring real-life tale, setting the context for Egyptian history and Tutankamun. For the first time this amazing work is available for Kindle. With a new Introduction and updated footnotes, you'll have more context to follow this book than Carter's original readers did. Much information that was yet to be understood or discovered in 1922 is included in the Introduction. Care has been taken to create a well-formatted book for Kindle. It includes images from the original publication. You can even take it with you on your smartphone if you have the Kindle app installed, and then refer to it while visiting the Tutankhamun exhibit in one of the cities it visits in North America. Remember to LOOK INSIDE by clicking the cover image in the upper left of this page. Buy this book today and you'll read it again and again.
The discovery of Tutankhamun's treasure-filled tomb is one of the greatest events in modern archeology. It is also a story so filled with intrigues, accusations, international imbroglios, and lasting scandals that it forever altered the way archaeological expeditions were organized and conducted. Hoving's Tutankhamun focuses on Howard Carter, the archaeologist who persisted for six years in his search in the Valley of the Kings for Tutankhamun's tomb. Other major figures in the discovery include: Carter's patron Lord Carnarvon, who died shortly after entering the tomb, thus kindling rumors of a curse; Carter's rival Pierre Lacau, a French Jesuit who headed the Antiquities Service in Cairo and did everything he could to ruin Carter and deny his claim; the Egyptian authorities determined to keep the artifacts of their national heritage in their country; and Arthur Weigall and other Egyptologists who felt slighted by Carter's refusal to admit experts anywhere near his discovery.
Develop students' critical-thinking skills through analysis of issues from different perspectives. Students make comparisons, draw analogies, and apply knowledge. Document-based assessment includes background information and key questions.
Take students beyond textbook history to explore various people and events from ancient Egypt through the 20th Century using primary sources. Students will develop critical-thinking and essay writing skills as they analyze the various documents including photographs, posters, letters, maps, and more. Multiple social studies topics are included for grades K-3, 4-8, and 9-12. A Teacher Resource CD is also included. This resource is aligned to the interdisciplinary themes from the Partnership for 21st Century Skills and supports the Common Core State Standards. 344pp.
Richard Hammond - TV presenter and self-confessed mystery addict - is on a quest to uncover the truth behind the rumours and whispers around some of the world's strangest ancient mysteries. Don't miss this instalment in the incredible series by Britain's best-loved TV personality. Explore the world's greatest mysteries - all from the comfort of your armchair!
Was Superman's arch nemesis Lex Luthor based on Aleister Crowley? Can Captain Marvel be linked to the Sun gods on antiquity? In Our Gods Wear Spandex, Christopher Knowles answers these questions and brings to light many other intriguing links between superheroes and the enchanted world of estoerica. Occult students and comic-book fans alike will discover countless fascinating connections, from little known facts such as that DC Comics editor Julius Schwartz started his career as H.P. Lovecraft's agent, to the tantalizingly extensive influence of Madame Blavatsky's Theosophy on the birth of comics, to the mystic roots of Superman. The book also traces the rise of the comic superheroes and how they relate to several cultural trends in the late 19th century, specifically the occult explosion in Western Europe and America. Knowles reveals the four basic superhero archetypes--the Messiah, the Golem, the Amazon, and the Brotherhood--and shows how the occult Bohemian underground of the early 20th century provided the inspiration for the modern comic book hero. With the popularity of occult comics writers like Invisibles creator Grant Morrison and V for Vendetta creator Alan Moore, the vast ComiCon audience is poised for someone to seriously introduce them to the esoteric mysteries. Chris Knowles is doing just that in this epic book. Chapters include Ancient of Days, Ascended Masters, God and Gangsters, Mad Scientists and Modern Sorcerers, and many more. From the ghettos of Prague to the halls of Valhalla to the Fortress of Solitude and the aisles of BEA and ComiCon, this is the first book to show the inextricable link between superheroes and the enchanted world of esoterica. * Chris Knowles is associate editor and columnist for the five-time Eisner Award-winning Comic Book Artist magazine, as well as a pop culture writer for UK magazine Classic Rock. * Knowles worked with Robert Smigel on The X Presidents graphic novel, based on the popular Saturday Night Live cartoon, and has created designs and artwork for many of the world's top superheroes and fantasy characters. * Features the art of Joe Linsner, creator of the legendary Dawn series, and more recently a collaborator with comics maestro Stan Lee.
With Using Graphic Organizers, students can practice analyzing nonfiction texts by using visual symbols to represent ideas and concepts, as well as learn to engage in information processing and higher-order thinking skills. Each lesson contains a blank organizer and a completed organizer with sample answers provided. Topics include he great Mayan mystery, Alexander the Great, earthquakes, and more. The book also provides differentiated instruction strategies and an interactive CD that allows organizers to be completed on a classroom whiteboard, computer projection device, or desktop computer. Mark Twain Media Publishing Company specializes in providing captivating, supplemental books and decorative resources to complement middle- and upper-grade classrooms. Designed by leading educators, the product line covers a range of subjects including mathematics, sciences, language arts, social studies, history, government, fine arts, and character. Mark Twain Media also provides innovative classroom solutions for bulletin boards and interactive whiteboards. Since 1977, Mark Twain Media has remained a reliable source for a wide variety of engaging classroom resources.
No archaeologist in history had ever seen an intact burial of an Egyptian pharaoh. Now Howard Carter and his team were about to open the innermost coffin of Tutankhamun. Volume II of this historical and exciting series covers the dismantling of the enormous golden shrines around Tutankhamun's sarcophagus, the opening of the sarcophagus, the mystery of the immense weight of the king's coffins, and the magical day when they became the first people to gaze on the boy king's face after more than 3,000 years. Remember to LOOK INSIDE by clicking the cover image in the upper left of this page. Buy this book today and you'll read it again and again. With his typical sensitive yet scientific prose, Carter draws you into this real-life story of adventure and hidden treasure. His collaborators have added sections on the objects and chemistry of the tomb, as well as Dr. Derry's examination of the mummy. Published for the first time for Kindle, Carter's 1927 Volume II follows the recent Kindle publication of Volume I. Both volumes have been meticulously edited with a modern Introduction and footnotes. Dive into the adventure. You'll read it again and again. For the first time, this long out-of-print volume is available as an affordable, well-formatted book for e-readers and smartphones. Be sure to LOOK INSIDE by clicking the cover above or download a sample.
Here is the definitive account of the Valley of the Kings, visited by millions of tourists and famous throughout the world as the burial place of the great New Kingdom pharaohs. Some eighty tombs were dug in the valley at the height of Egyptian power more than 3,000 years ago, their chambers stocked with incredible treasures and decorated with magnificent wall paintings. It was here, in 1922, that Howard Carter stumbled upon the virtually intact tomb of the boy-king, Tutankhamun. Recently the valley has made international headlines with the discovery of the burial chapels of Ramesses the Great's many sons; The Complete Valley of the Kings is the first book to publish an account of these remarkable findings. Reeves and Wilkinson, both acknowledged authorities on the valley, bring together the art, archaeology and history in one exciting account.
Egypt, 1922: the Valley of the Kings. After years of fruitless labour, the archaeologist Howard Carter discovers a mysterious tomb, sealed and marked with a terrible curse. But what is the nature of the tomb's deadly secret? And what is the web of strange connections spreading back through millennia, to the very heart of Egypt's fabulous past? In a glorious Arabian Nightmare of lost cities, treacherous priests and daring archaeologists, an ancient civilisation shimmers into life; colourful, magical, and unutterably strange. 'True adventure stories are all too scarce nowadays. And adventure stories that have the capacity to make the reader think and wonder are an even rarer commodity. Tom Holland's latest novel manages both with tremendous verve ... a galloping page-turner' DAILY TELEGRAPH
Another engaging book from International Reading Association and Children's Book Council "Children's Choices" award-winning author, Ken Derby During Egypt's Eighteenth Dynasty, the Valley of the Kings was used as a royal graveyard. Over the next 3000 years, all but three tombs were discovered in that hot, barren valley. By the early 1900s, most archaeologists believed the three missing royal burial sites were located somewhere else. One of those tombs belonged to Tutankhamun, Egypt's boy king. However, Howard Carter, an archeologist, and George Herbert, a classic English aristocrat, believed differently. The two met for the first time in 1909 and discovered that they had something in common: a strong desire to find the location of Tutankhamun's tomb. They formed an alliance and set their sights on this seemingly unattainable goal. With imagined dialogue, Ken Derby reveals the true-life adventure story of Howard Carter, his discovery of King Tutankhamun's tomb, his attempts to unravel the mysteries surrounding this ancient Egyptian child king, and the puzzling "curses" that seemed to follow many involved with the tomb's discovery.
The discovery of the resting place of the great Egyptian King Tutankhamun [Tut.ankh.Amen] in November 1922 by Howard Carter and the fifth Earl of Carnarvon was the greatest archaeological find the world had ever seen. Despite its plundering by thieves in antiquity, the burial of the king lay intact with its nest of coffins and funerary shrines, surrounded by a mass of burial equipment arranged in three peripheral chambers. Published in 1923, this is the first volume of Carter's trilogy, describing the years of frustration in search of the burial site, the triumph of its eventual discovery and the long, painstaking process of exploring and cataloguing its treasures. Containing over 100 images from the site itself, this volume also includes Carter's short article, 'The Tomb of the Bird,' which inadvertently spawned the legend of the great curse of Tutankhamun's tomb.
Drawing on Jungian psychology to show why Egypt has been so important in the history of Western civilisation, Michael Rice explains the majesty and enduring appeal of Egyptian civilization. Jung claimed that there exist certain psychological drives dormant in our shared unconscious: these are the archetypes. From the omnipotent god to the idea of the nation state, the formulation of most of these archetypes is owed to ancient Egypt. Michael Rice sets out to recover the sense of wonder that the Egyptians themselves felt as they contemplated the world in which they lived, and the way they expressed that wonder in the religion, art and literature. He traces the story of Egyptian civilization from its emergence in the third millennium BC to its transformation following the Macedonian conquest in 30 BC.
Presents short profiles of famous men throughout history, from King Tut to Crazy Horse to Stan Lee to Shaun White.
The world has always been fascinated with ancient Egypt. When the Romans conquered Egypt, it was really Egypt that conquered the Romans. Cleopatra captivated both Caesar and Marc Antony and soon Roman ladies were worshipping Isis and wearing vials of Nile water around their necks. What is it about ancient Egypt that breeds such obsession and imitation? Egyptomania explores the burning fascination with all things Egyptian and the events that fanned the flames--from ancient times, to Napoleon's Egyptian campaign, to the Discovery of Tutankhamen's tomb by Howard Carter in the 1920s. For forty years, Bob Brier, one of the world's foremost Egyptologists, has been amassing one of the largest collections of Egyptian memorabilia and seeking to understand the pull of ancient Egypt on our world today. In this original and groundbreaking book, with twenty-four pages of color photos from the author's collection, he explores our three-thousand-year-old fixation with recovering Egyptian culture and its meaning. He traces our enthrallment with the mummies that seem to have cheated death and the pyramids that seem as if they will last forever. Drawing on his personal collection — from Napoleon's twenty-volume Egypt encyclopedia to Howard Carter's letters written from the Valley of the Kings as he was excavating — this is an inventive and mesmerizing tour of how an ancient civilization endures in ours today.

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